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18 MARCH 2012

Australian Aboriginal On-line Television: short-form original content

"Australian Aboriginal On–line Television aims to be one of the world's best video sites. We specialize in short–form original content – from new, emerging talents. We're committed to delivering an exceptional entertainment experience and we do so by engaging and empowering our audience every step of the way.

Everyone can Watch Videos on Australian Aboriginal On–line Television. By uploading your video people will be able to see first–hand accounts of current events, find videos about their hobbies and interests, and discover the quirky and unusual. As more people capture special moments on video, Australian Aboriginal On–line Television is empowering them to become the broadcasters of tomorrow.

Australian Aboriginal On–line Television is not only a video sharing website but also has social network features, you can make friends, and send them videos and private messages. Australian Aboriginal On–line Television also has built in rating system and comment system so that people can discuss on their interested videos, not only comment but also, people can rate Comments."

(Australian Aboriginal On–line Television)

Fig.1 "Australia's Natural Heritage", Oski Pictures Australia (http://www.oskipictures.com/).

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TAGS

17882010 • AATV • AboriginalAborigineancestorsAustraliaAustralian Aboriginal On-line TelevisionAustralian Aboriginebroadcastercomment systemcultural identity • current events • emerging talent • empowering • engaging and empowering our audienceentertainment experience • first-hand account • historyIndigenousIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous languagemediamoviesonline televisionoriginal contentquirky and unusualrating systemshort-form • short-form original content • social network • special moments • Stolen Generation • televisionTorres Strait IslanderTVvideo sharing • video site • videos

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 APRIL 2010

If there is anywhere in the post-colonial world where two cultural worlds truly live an engaged life alongside each other, it's in New Zealand

"The 1840 Treaty of Waitangi which, in usual imperial style, seized sovereignty from the Maori and laid it at the feet of Queen Victoria did so on condition that their property rights and political and cultural integrity were respected. Needless to say in the generations that followed, this pact was respected more in the breach than the observance, but New Zealand history did follow its own extraordinary course.

In their first wars against violations of Waitangi the Maori effectively won the battle with the pakeha. Decimated by imported diseases for which they had no immunity, the Maori were expected, at the turn of the 20th Century to be on their way to extinction or extreme marginalisation like native Americans or Australian aborigines. Nothing of the sort has happened.

Today they constitute – by one count – almost 20% of the population and astonishingly a special tribunal created in the 1970s has been ruling on land claims dating back to the post–Waitangi years. Maori and the descendants of intermarriages that go back deep into the 19th Century, are to be found in every leading walk of life in the country.

Of course there have been serious problems of unequal social opportunity, of street gangs. But if there is anywhere in the post–colonial world where two cultural worlds truly live an engaged life alongside each other, it's in New Zealand."

(Simon Schama, 9 April 2010, BBC News)

Fig.1 Warwick Freeman, 1992. Tiki Face

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TAGS

18401970s19th centuryAborigineAotearoa New ZealandAustralasiaAustralian AborigineCommonwealthcultural heritage • cultural integrity • diseaseextinction • gangs • historyIndigenous • intermarriage • land claims • MaorimarginalisationNative Americans • Newstralia • Pakeha • political integrity • postcolonial • Queen Victoria • settlement • social opportunity • sovereigntyTe Tiriti o Waitangitiki • tribuna

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2010

The Austronesian speaking people have voyaged for centuries making a network of communication

"Across the Pacific and Indian oceans, the Austronesian speaking people have voyaged for centuries making a network of communication within this linguistic family to be the most extensive in the world prior to the European colonial days. Launched from the Western Pacific, in the neighborhood of the South China Sea (yet undetermined), the early Austronesian speakers reached islands of further distance apart traveling in canoes lashed and pegged together to Micronesia, the Lesser Sunda, and the Society Islands to Easter Island and Hawaii. In the westerly direction, voyagers made it to Madagascar. It set the stage for pan– Pacific/Indian Ocean long distance navigation (Sneider and Kyselka 1986).

As this tracing of oceans happened from 5500 years ago to the ethnographic present, the network process of these cultures is now only becoming to be understood as vast sophisticated complex (Bellwood 1998). For Westerners, this was observed by Captain Cook, a British explorer of the oceans and terra incognito in the 1700s his discovered that Austronesian speakers had advance information on his visits before his arrival to islands across the Pacific.

The earliest evidence of the Austronesian linguistic family points to Taiwan (yet unconfirmed as such), and the surrounding islands. Presently there are just under a dozen distinct groups in this family inhabiting the plain such as the Kavalan and Amis, the mountain areas, and the offshore isle of Lanyu where the Daowu (or Yami) live. These people have different cultures proving them with specialized means of co–existing with the natural environment."

(David Blundell, Jieh Hsiang)

[D. Blundell & J. Hsiang, 'Taiwan Austronesian Electronic Cultural Atlas of the Pacific' Proceedings of the 1999 EBTI, ECAI, SEER and PNC Joint Meeting, pp.525–540, January 1999.]

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TAGS

1999Aborigine • Amis • Austronesian cultures • Austronesian speakers • Captain Cookcultures • Daowu • diaspora • Easter Island • ethnographic • Fiji • Formosan languages • Hawaiiidentity • Indian oceans • Indigenous • Kavalan • Lanyu • Lapita peoplelinguisticsMadagascar • Malayo-Polynesian languages • Micronesia • migrationnatural environmentOceaniaPacific Rim • pan-Indian Ocean • pan-Pacific Ocean • settlementSociety Islands • South China Sea • Sunda • TaiwanTaiwanese Aborigines • Western Pacific • Yami

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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