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25 JULY 2010

Better Place Australia: zero emissions driving

"Better Place Australia is part of a global company dedicated to zero emissions driving. We will enable the mass adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) in Australia by providing the infrastructure and services that make it easy, affordable and attractive for motorists to adopt and drive electric vehicles.

The key barriers to the mass adoption of EVs in Australia, and globally, have been 'range anxiety', the cost and risk of battery purchase and the impact of EV charging on the electricity grid.

To overcome 'range anxiety' – the fear of EV drivers that their battery will run out of power – Better Place provides a personal charge spot at home, access to a network of charge spots at work and in public, access to 'instant recharge' through battery swap stations and in–car services to help drivers know when and where to recharge.

The system of battery swapping also helps overcome the cost and risk of battery purchase. The driver's subscription to Better Place covers use of a battery and the ability to swap and go at any swap station. Rather than pay upfront, drivers pay a monthly fee which covers their battery use. Better Place manages the risk and performance of the pool of batteries by tracking their capability and use through the battery swap stations.

Better Place manages the impact of EV charging on the electricity grid by using software that coordinates the charge spots so that the charging needs of customers are met within network capacity constraints. . This helps make the electricity grid more efficient and significantly reduces the need for additional generation, transmission and distribution infrastructure."

(Better Place, 2010)

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TAGS

20082010Australiabattery • battery swap stations • battery swapping • Better Place • California • Cinema City • cleantech • consumptionDenmarkdesign intelligencedeviceefficiency • electric cars • electric vehicle network • electric vehicles • electricity • emission free • ethics • EV • Haifa • Hawaii • Holon • industrial designinfrastructureinnovationIsraelJerusalem • Kfar Sava • NissanOntarioOregonpeak oil • Pi-Glilot • range anxiety • Renault • Renault-Nissan alliance • renewable energy • Shai Agassi • solar arrays • solutionsustainabilitytechnologyTel Avivtransition • wind farms • zero emissions • zero emissions driving • zero-emission vehicles

CONTRIBUTOR

Lindsay Quennell
15 JANUARY 2010

The Austronesian speaking people have voyaged for centuries making a network of communication

"Across the Pacific and Indian oceans, the Austronesian speaking people have voyaged for centuries making a network of communication within this linguistic family to be the most extensive in the world prior to the European colonial days. Launched from the Western Pacific, in the neighborhood of the South China Sea (yet undetermined), the early Austronesian speakers reached islands of further distance apart traveling in canoes lashed and pegged together to Micronesia, the Lesser Sunda, and the Society Islands to Easter Island and Hawaii. In the westerly direction, voyagers made it to Madagascar. It set the stage for pan– Pacific/Indian Ocean long distance navigation (Sneider and Kyselka 1986).

As this tracing of oceans happened from 5500 years ago to the ethnographic present, the network process of these cultures is now only becoming to be understood as vast sophisticated complex (Bellwood 1998). For Westerners, this was observed by Captain Cook, a British explorer of the oceans and terra incognito in the 1700s his discovered that Austronesian speakers had advance information on his visits before his arrival to islands across the Pacific.

The earliest evidence of the Austronesian linguistic family points to Taiwan (yet unconfirmed as such), and the surrounding islands. Presently there are just under a dozen distinct groups in this family inhabiting the plain such as the Kavalan and Amis, the mountain areas, and the offshore isle of Lanyu where the Daowu (or Yami) live. These people have different cultures proving them with specialized means of co–existing with the natural environment."

(David Blundell, Jieh Hsiang)

[D. Blundell & J. Hsiang, 'Taiwan Austronesian Electronic Cultural Atlas of the Pacific' Proceedings of the 1999 EBTI, ECAI, SEER and PNC Joint Meeting, pp.525–540, January 1999.]

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TAGS

1999Aborigine • Amis • Austronesian cultures • Austronesian speakers • Captain Cookcultures • Daowu • diaspora • Easter Island • ethnographic • Fiji • Formosan languages • Hawaiiidentity • Indian oceans • Indigenous • Kavalan • Lanyu • Lapita peoplelinguisticsMadagascar • Malayo-Polynesian languages • Micronesia • migrationnatural environmentOceaniaPacific Rim • pan-Indian Ocean • pan-Pacific Ocean • settlementSociety Islands • South China Sea • Sunda • TaiwanTaiwanese Aborigines • Western Pacific • Yami

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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