Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Digital World' keyword pg.1 of 2
17 DECEMBER 2012

Designing the Bookshop of the Future

"What makes a good bookshop? Should second–hand be in the mix too? Is a café important? How do you incorporate digital? Foyles' clarion call at the Bookseller's FutureBook conference in London last week seeks to answer some of these questions.

The retailer has joined forces with the Bookseller to invite customers and industry experts to help design its new flagship on Charing Cross Road, which it will move into in early 2014. With discoverability of increasing importance, the timing couldn't be more apposite. Everyone is agreed that bricks and mortar bookshops are under threat, but what elements are needed to make a physical bookstore survive in an increasingly digital world? ...

'Foyles has to create something that gives people an experience,' said former London Book Fair Director Alistair Burtenshaw. 'It has to be a destination store, a shop in which people want to spend a considerable amount of time. It has to be an environment that adds value. When you make it a more personalized experience, you are happy to pay more."

(Roger Tagholm, 12 December 2012)

1

TAGS

2014 • Alistair Burtenshaw • booksellersbookshop • bookshop of the future • bricks and mortarcafeCharing Cross Roadconference • consumer destination • Covent Gardencustomersdestination imagedestination storedigital worlddiscoverabilitydwell timeeconomic recessionenvironment that adds valueexperience design • Foyles (shop) • FutureBook (conference) • high streethigh street shopsincorporate digital • Livraria Cultura • London • London Book Fair • Miriam Robinson • personalised experience • Philip Jones • physical bookstorephysical presencephysical storeretailerSao Paolo • second-hand • shift to digitalshopspatial environmentsspend time • Stanfords Travel Bookshop • The Bookseller • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2012

Plug and play: the 'new purpose' of physical consumer space

"an effective physical connection is still absolutely imperative to brand success. Rather than assuming that the physical space is being hindered by the growth of digital activity, brands and designers are beginning to embrace the newer channels where consumers are choosing to spend their time and deliver a physical environment that adds value around these. Get the basic understanding of the 'new purpose' of the physical space right and the physical manifestation of the design will boom from there.

The key is to design interiors that can respond and morph with social and cultural shifts, so that the spaces become a form of 'cultural commentary', adding value to the popular activities of today's audiences. Above all, interior design must be approached in a way that ensures that the brand communicates a relevant message through this critical channel. This can be achieved by considering and responding to three key topics: cultural relevance, social context and technology integration."

(Lucy Johnston, Design Week)

Fig. "The Anthropologist", iloveretail.com

1

TAGS

activity and consumption • added valueadded value through design • always connected • audience • brand concepts • brand success • brands • buying online • colourways • communication channel • concrete space • consumer culture • consumer experience • consumerscultural commentarycultural relevance • cultural shifts • design features • design interiors • digital activity • digital designdigital worlddwell timeeffective brand spaceexperience designgraphic designinterior design • Lucy Johnston • new purpose of the physical space • personal freedom • physical connection • physical consumer spacephysical environmentphysical manifestationphysical retail spacephysical space • plug and play • popular activities • print design • relevant messages • respond and morph • social context • social shifts • solid space • spacesspatial designsuccessful brand spacetechnology integrationvirtual world

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 NOVEMBER 2012

Hyper Island: designing learning experiences to stay creative and competitive in an increasingly digitised world

"For over 15 years Hyper Island has been designing learning experiences for students and industry professionals alike. It all started with three men, a few beers, and one vision. The year was 1994, and multimedia pioneers Lars Lundh, Jonathan Briggs, and David Erixon converged in bar in Stockholm to discuss an upcoming CD–ROM project.

Together they realized their new digital world demanded a new kind of learning: industry–based learning. They envisioned a new institution that could prepare people for the lightening–fast pace of the modern workplace. A place where students could grow, not only as professionals, but also as human beings. ...

Hyper Island is now a thriving global presence, with two main areas of focus. Student Programs immerse young talent in intensive learning experiences from digital art direction to e–Commerce to data strategy. Executive Programs boost understanding of how digital changes societies and consumer behavior –– and how organizations need to change to stay creative and competitive in an increasingly digitized world. Hyper Island is now worldwide, located in Stockholm, Karlskrona, New York, London, and soon, Singapore. And Executive Programs teams can travel around the world designing and executing learning experiences for Fortune 500 companies and start–ups alike.

As the digital world shifts and evolves, Hyper Island continues to react and expand, creating an agile, forward–looking learning environment for students and industry leaders. What began as a bold experiment on a windswept island has become a revolutionary way to learn, reflect, collaborate, and above all, innovate."

(Charlotte Sundåker)

1

TAGS

1994 • bold experiment • CD-ROM • centre for learning • challenging students • collaborateconsumer behaviourcreativity and innovation • data strategy • David Erixon • designing learning experiences • digital art direction • digital changes societies • digital worlddigitised worlde-commerceexperiential learningHyper Islandindustry leadersindustry professionals • industry-based learning • innovate • intensive learning experiences • Jonathan Briggs • Karlskrona • Lars Lundh • learning environmentLondonmultimedia • new digital world • new kind of learning • New Yorkpersonal developmentprofessional developmentreflect • revolutionary way to learn • Singapore • stay competitive • stay creative • Stockholmstudents • Stumholmen • Swedenworkplaceyoung talent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 SEPTEMBER 2012

1000heads: The Word of Mouth People

"Traditional marketing was built for another age. Today a new creative energy is required. Sociability is the media of now. Social connections happen everywhere, every minute of every day, in the real world and in the digital world. Social communication touches everybody. Brands are carried along in the stories people share, and the conversations they have, in social media, on their mobiles, and face to face. We help brands to get their stories to travel further and faster, building sustained relationships and advocacy as they go.

Our story began in a (thankfully converted) cowshed back in 2000. We saw that a new age of communication was emerging, an age of social communication. Since then we have worked with some of the world's best businesses helping them to behave in different ways; encouraging participation and collaboration with their audiences. We now have an 90–strong team of talented thinkers, doers and sometime dreamers who bring social communication to life for brands around the world."

(1000heads)

1

TAGS

1000heads • 2000advocacyaudiencebrandingbrandscollaborationconnected • conversations people have • digital worldface-to-facemarketingmarketing practices • media of now • mobilenetworknetwork society • new communication age • new creative energy • participationsociability • social communication • social connections • social media • stories people share • sustained relationships • their stories • thinkers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2011

Rien a Cacher Rien a Craindre

"As the first artists in residence at la Gaîté lyrique in Paris, UVA created Rien a Cacher / Rien a Craindre, a series of responsive light and sound installations that together seduced and unsettled visitors in a unique way.

Exploring the unexamined assumption that digital technology is moving us towards utopia, UVA created a visitor experience simultaneously celebrating and critiquing the brave new world of the digital.

Over 14.000 people saw the installation over six days from 1–6 March 2011."

(United Visual Artists)

1

TAGS

2011artist in residenceassumptionsbrave new worlddigital technologydigital world • Gaite lyrique • installationlightlight artlight installationlight sculptureParisresponsive light installationresponsive sound installation • Rien a Cacher • Rien a Craindre • sound installationspectacleUnited Visual Artists • unsettling • utopia • UVA • visitor experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.