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Which clippings match 'Diller + Scofidio' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 NOVEMBER 2014

Time and effort studies of woman undressing

Time motion studies, Rene Leonhardt, W. P (1942) "The camera reveals that you are ungraceful!!", American Photography, May: 24–5.. Diller Elizabeth. 1994. Flesh: Architectural Probes by Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio. New York. Princeton Architectural Press, p.40. [http://predmet.fa.uni–lj.si/siwinds/s2/u4/su4/S2_U4_su4_p5_3.htm]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 NOVEMBER 2014

Time and effort studies comparing the efficiency of pre-prepared meals with that of meals prepared from scratch

"Pre–cooked foods, made possible by new packaging development, are a major time–saver for housewives. Notice the difference in time and effort required in the preparation of a pre–cooked, pre–packaged goulash dinner and one fixed entirely from scratch. lights attached to the cook's wrists show how many more movements she had to make in the 90 minutes it took the long way, compared with the pre–cooked way which took only 12 minute."

(Elizabeth Diller, 1999, p.386)

Elizabeth Diller (1999). Bad Press. "Gender Space Architecture: An Interdisciplinary Introduction". editors: Iain Borden, Barbara Penner and Jane Rendell, Routledge.

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TAGS

bodies in spacecirculationcooking in the kitchenDiller + ScofidiodinnerefficiencyElizabeth Dillereveryday movement • fast food preparation • Georges Teyssot • goulash • home cooked meal • housewifehuman factors in designhuman motionkitchen • labour-saving • lightsLillian Gilbreth • meal preparation • motion-trackingmovement analysismovement efficiencymovement in spacepatterns of movement • pre-cooked • pre-prepared meals • prepackaged food • prepackaged mealpreparing a mealready mealready-made mealRicardo Scofidio • spatial information • spatial mappingstudying motionThe Kitchen Practical (1929)time savingtime-motion studiestracingtrajectoryunderstanding movementwasted motion • wrist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 APRIL 2010

Blur Building: Anti high-definition and visual fidelity

"The Blur Building was built for the Swiss Expo 2002 on Lake Neuchatel. It is an architecture of atmosphere. The lightweight tensegrity structure measures 300 feet wide by 200 feet deep by 75 feet high. The primary building material is indigenous to the site, water. Water is pumped from the lake, filtered, and shot as a fine mist through 31,500 high–pressure mist nozzles. A smart weather system reads the shifting climactic conditions of temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, and processes the data in a central computer that regulates water pressure.

Upon entering the fog mass, visual and acoustic references are erased, leaving only an optical 'white–out' and the 'white–noise' of pulsing nozzles. Blur is an anti–spectacle. Contrary to immersive environments that strive for high–definition visual fidelity with ever–greater technical virtuosity, Blur is decidedly low–definition: there is nothing to see but our dependence on vision itself."

(Diller Scofidio + Renfro)

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TAGS

2002 • anti-spectacle • architecture • architecture of atmosphere • Blur Building • Diller + ScofidioDiller Scofidio + Renfrofidelityfoghigh-definitionimmersiveimmersive environments • Lake Neuchatel • Liz Dillerlow-definition • mist • natureRic Scofidio • smart weather • spectaclestructure • Swiss Expo 2002 • technical virtuosity • tensegrity • visual fidelitywater • white noise • white-out • Yverdon-les-Bains

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 JANUARY 2009

Imaginary Architecture and Spatial Immediacy

"Unbuilt and unbuildable architecture represents an imaginary world beyond the reality and experience of built architecture. Digital technologies have transformed not only the design process but increasingly blurred the frontier between the fictive and the real space. How can imaginary architecture relate to the experience of built space?"
(Ingrid Böck)

TAGS

2007architecture • Architektur • Bauhaus WeimarBauhaus-Kolloquium • Bild • built spacedesign • Digitalisierung • Diller + Scofidio • imaginary architecture • Ingrid Böck • Raum • space • spatial immediacy • unbuildable architecture • unbuilt

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2004

Diller + Scofidio: Refresh Webcam Project

Sara Tucker
Diller + Scofidio have taken office webcams as their point of departure, with the intention of examining the role of live video technologies on everyday life. A webcam is a camera that takes pictures at set intervals, that can range from 15 times per second to once per hour, then instantly transmits the images to a web server, where the image becomes simultaneously available to anyone on the web. At present, thousands of webcams exist, broadcasting live pictures of fish tanks, traffic conditions, vending machines, private bedrooms, offices...For each of the dozen sites located in the US, Europe and Australia that Diller + Scofidio selected for this project, they have constructed fictional narratives using text and fabricated images. For every site there is a grid of twelve images, one of which is live and refreshes when clicked; the other eleven have been constructed for this project with the aid of hired actors and Photoshop. None of the people from the actual location appear in the fabricated images; however, the juxtaposition of the live and the fictional establishes a provocative correspondence. The stories, which range in time from a single day to several seasons, concentrate on subtle changes in behavior as a consequence of the acknowledged presence of the camera in the office: a gradual shift in dress style, the activities of an after–hours cleaning crew, a ritual of stacking paper, one person's discreet and incessant ordering of take out food, and a potential office romance unfolding by the water cooler. There is nothing shocking or dramatic, rather, everyday conventions are slightly modified, either to perform for or to hide from the camera.

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TAGS

architectural conjecturebroadcastDiller + Scofidiofictional • interval • livenarrativeserversite • transmit • videowebcam
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