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Which clippings match 'Selective Focus' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 FEBRUARY 2015

1980s television commercial for Westpac Bank, Australia

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TAGS

1980sadadvertisement designAustraliabank • banking • cinematographycolour tintfilm editing • incomplete sentences • quick cutsselective focus • sentence fragments • shallow depth of fieldshallow focustelevision advertisement • television commercial • TVCWestpacWestpac Bank • Westpac Banking Corporation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MARCH 2012

CINEMA ESSAY: SHALLOW FOCUS, DEEP FOCUS, TRACKING SHOT, ESTABLISHING SHOT

Majestic Micro Movies: Lloyd Fonvielle, James Lester, Kendra Elliot, Joe Griffin and Jae Song.

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TAGS

a girl and a gunAndre Bazin • big depth of field • black and whitecameracinemacinematic conventionscinematic languagecinematic visual languagecinematographyclapperboardcoherent spacecompositioncontinuity editingdeep focusdepth of fielddepth of the screen spacedesign formalismDOF • establishing shot • figures in spacefilmfilm language • film take • film technique • filmlook • filmmaking • focus of attention • Manny Farber • master shot • medium is the messagemise-en-scenenarrative scenesproductionscenescreen spaceselective focusshallow depth of fieldshallow focus • shot countershot • shot reverse shottracking cameratracking shot • two shot • video essayvisual depictionvisual languagevisual literacyvisual style • wide lens

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2011

Madonna's Justify My Love: beautiful black and white shallow focus

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TAGS

1990 • Bandits Productions • beautifulbisexualbisexualityblack and whitebreakbeatcinematographycontroversialdance • drum break • explicit sexual images • female sexualityglamourhaving sexhotel • hotel hallway • Ingrid Chavez • James Brown • Jean-Baptiste Mondino • Jeanne Moreau • Justify My Love • Lenny Kravitz • Madonna • music singlesmusic video • Pascal Lebegue • Philippe Dupuis-Mendel • Propaganda Films • Public Enemy • sadomasochismselective focussex • sexually seduced • shallow depth of fieldshallow focus • singer-songwriter • Sire Records • songTony Ward • trip-hop • voyeurismwhisper

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JANUARY 2010

Avatar: selective rather than deep focus stereoscopic cinematography

James Cameron: "I think it's a myth that you want deep focus in 3–D shots. I find the opposite is true. Selective focus, created by working at low f–stops with longer lenses, evolved as a cinematic technique to direct the audience's attention to the character of greatest narrative importance at a given moment. With 3–D, the director needs to lead the audience's eye, not let it roam around the screen to areas which are not converged. So all the usual cinematic techniques of selective focus, separation lighting, composition, etc., that one would use in a 2–D film to direct the eye to the subject of interest, still apply, and are perhaps even more important. We all see the world in 3–D. The difference between really being witness to an event vs. seeing it as a stereo image is that when you're really there, your eye can adjust its convergence as it roves over subjects at different distances. Convergence is the natural toe–in that the eye does to align the left and right eye images of objects at specific planes of depth. In a filmed image, the convergence was baked in at the moment of photography, so you can't adjust it. In order to cut naturally and rapidly from one subject to another, it's necessary for the filmmaker (actually his/her camera team) to put the convergence at the place in the shot where the audience is most likely to look. This sounds complicated but in fact we do it all the time, in every shot, and have since the beginning of cinema. It's called focus. We focus where we think people are most likely to look. So I've found that just slaving the convergence function to the focus works exceedingly well, and makes good stereo a no–brainer on the set."

(David S. Cohen, 10 April 2008, Variety Magazine)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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