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Which clippings match 'Cinematic Technique' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 JUNE 2016

Horror movie spliced to cat reactions for convincing effect

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TAGS

absorptionanthropomorphism • attribution of human emotions • attribution of human traits • catcinematic techniquecinematic tension • convincing effect • diegetic sounddramatic tensionempathyengrossmentfacial nuance • fearful • frightened • horror movie • human behavioural traits • human emotions • kitten • micro expressionsPsychoreaction videoscream • suspenseful action • viral videovisual depictionwatching • watching cat videos • YouTubeYouTube video

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MARCH 2014

Norman Kirk split-screen political ad for 1969 NZ general election

"This 1969 advertisement for the Labour Party emphasised the leadership qualities of Norman Kirk and sought to capitalise on a public mood for change as that turbulent decade drew to a close. It screened in full colour in cinemas and in black–and–white on television (colour TV wasn't introduced until 1973). Its striking split–screen imagery and pop–styled theme song were clearly aimed at younger voters, a potentially important audience in an election when the voting age was lowered from 21 to 20 (it would be reduced further, to 18, in 1974). It was not enough, however, to oust Keith Holyoake's National government, which had ruled for the previous nine years."

TAGS

1969advertisementAotearoa New Zealand • campaign advertising • cinematic techniqueColenso BBDO • dancing Cossacks (political TV ad) • film techniquegeneral electionintra-frame • Keith Holyoake • Labour governmentLabour Party • mood for change • National (political party) • Norman Kirk • optical printing • political advertising • Prime MinisterRobert Muldoonsplit-screenThomas Crown Affair (1968) • turbulent decade • TV commercial

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2013

Maria, Mirabella: mixed live action and animation feature film

"A combined film about the two sisters, Maria and Mirabella, on their mission to find the Forest Fairy and rescue Quacky the frog, frozen in a block of ice, Skipirich the firefly, who has lost his ability to light up and Omide, the butterfly, who can not actually fly. They travel through the magic forest and after many adventures their rescue mission turns out well."

(Animator.ru)

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TAGS

19812D animation • Adrian Stefanescu • Alexandrina Halic • animated feature film • anthropomorphic depiction • Boris Kotov • butterfly • Calugareanu Anda • cartoon characterscinematic technique • Cornel Popescu • Dan Ionescu • Eugen Doga • Eugene Agranovici • fireworm • forest • forest fairy • frog • Gilda Manolescu • girls • Grigore Vieru • iceIon Popescu-Gopo • larvae • Leonid Serebrennikov • Lev Milchin • live action and animation • magic forest • magical world • Maria • Medeea Marinescu • metamorphosis of animals • Mihai Constantinescu • Mirabella • Paula Radulescu • pupa • RomaniaRomanian • Romanian language • Romanian Radio and Television Orchestra • Russian language • sorceress • Soviet animation • Valentin Berestov • Viktor Dudko • Vladimir Kutuzov • Vocal Group 5T • woods

CONTRIBUTOR

Valeria Marti
12 OCTOBER 2011

Man With a Movie Camera: Dziga Vertov's groundbreaking film

"Dziga Vertov's Man With A Movie Camera is considered one of the most innovative and influential films of the silent era. Startlingly modern, this film utilizes a groundbreaking style of rapid editing and incorporates innumerable other cinematic effects to create a work of amazing power and energy. Film pioneer Dziga Vertov uses all the cinematic techniques available at the time – dissolves, split screen, slow motion and freeze frames."

(Moving Image Archive)

Fig.1 Dziga Vertov (1929). 'Man With A Movie Camera', VUFKU (The Ukrainian Photo and Cinema Administration).

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TAGS

1929a film without actorsanimation • backward • Chelovek s kino-apparatom • Cinematic Orchestra • cinematic techniquecity symphonyclose-up • CU • daily lifeday in the lifedocumentary film • double exposure • Dutch angle • Dziga Vertov • ECU • extreme close-up • fast motion • filmfilm directorfilm techniquefootagefreeze framegroundbreakinginfluential worksinventionjump cutMan with a Movie Camera • Mikhail Kaufman • RussianRussian filmmakerself-reflexivity • silent documentary film • silent filmslow motionsplit-screentechniquetracking shot

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JANUARY 2010

Avatar: selective rather than deep focus stereoscopic cinematography

James Cameron: "I think it's a myth that you want deep focus in 3–D shots. I find the opposite is true. Selective focus, created by working at low f–stops with longer lenses, evolved as a cinematic technique to direct the audience's attention to the character of greatest narrative importance at a given moment. With 3–D, the director needs to lead the audience's eye, not let it roam around the screen to areas which are not converged. So all the usual cinematic techniques of selective focus, separation lighting, composition, etc., that one would use in a 2–D film to direct the eye to the subject of interest, still apply, and are perhaps even more important. We all see the world in 3–D. The difference between really being witness to an event vs. seeing it as a stereo image is that when you're really there, your eye can adjust its convergence as it roves over subjects at different distances. Convergence is the natural toe–in that the eye does to align the left and right eye images of objects at specific planes of depth. In a filmed image, the convergence was baked in at the moment of photography, so you can't adjust it. In order to cut naturally and rapidly from one subject to another, it's necessary for the filmmaker (actually his/her camera team) to put the convergence at the place in the shot where the audience is most likely to look. This sounds complicated but in fact we do it all the time, in every shot, and have since the beginning of cinema. It's called focus. We focus where we think people are most likely to look. So I've found that just slaving the convergence function to the focus works exceedingly well, and makes good stereo a no–brainer on the set."

(David S. Cohen, 10 April 2008, Variety Magazine)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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