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Which clippings match 'University Of Sheffield' keyword pg.1 of 1
14 MAY 2013

The University of Sheffield Arts Tower paternoster lift

"The Arts Tower's paternoster lift has 38 carriages which could make it the largest of the few surviving paternosters in the UK, and possibly the largest in the world.

A paternoster is a lift made up of a chain of open carriages, each for two people, that move in a loop up and down the building without stopping. The cars travel slowly enough so that passengers can step on or off at any floor they like.
Paternoster lift in action

When you get to the very top or the very bottom of the building, the cars move horizontally across before continuing vertically upwards or downwards and at this point, everything goes dark while you travel behind the wall (rather than in the open air as happens during the rest of the journey).

You can also get around the Arts Tower by normal elevator, and stairs of course – but there are 20 storeys to the building so it's a fit and brave person who decides to walk to the top by staircase!"

(BBC South Yorkshire, 19/09/2008)

Fig.1 James Benedict Brown "University of Sheffield Arts Tower Paternoster", Uploaded on 22 Dec 2007.
Fig.2 Richard France (16 April 2012) [http://www.flickr.com/photos/richardfrance/7103541017/].

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TAGS

1965 • BDR • Bureau of Design Research • cyclic elevator • elevator • floor layout • Flora Samuel • GMW Architects • Gollins Melvin Ward • HLM Architects • landmarklift • passenger elevator • paternoster • paternoster lift • refurbishment • School of Architecture • SheffieldtowerUKUniversity of Sheffield

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MAY 2011

Connected Histories: digital resources of early modern and 19th century Britain

"Connected Histories brings together a range of digital resources related to early modern and nineteenth century Britain with a single federated search that allows sophisticated searching of names, places and dates, as well as the ability to save, connect and share resources within a personal workspace."

(University of Hertfordshire, University of London, University of Sheffield, 2011)

Fig.1 "The photograph shows the beach at Cromer in Norfolk, which features in Emma (1816) as 'The best of all the sea–bathing places'. A small fishing village then, noted for its crabs, by 1887 the railway had arrived. The pier (which still stands) was built in 1901." Martin (Manuscripts Cataloguer), Caird Library

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TAGS

19th century2011Bodleian LibraryBritainBritish history • British Origins • Connected Histories • conservationcultural heritagecultural representationsdigital heritagedigital resourcesdigitisationearly modern periodEconomic and Social Research Council • eContent • everyday lifefamily historygenealogy • Higher Education Digitisation Service • history • HRI Online Publications • Humanities Research Institute • ICT • Irish Origins • JISC • John Johnson Collection • John Strype • Leverhulme Trust • London Lives • manuscriptmapsmuseologynational cultural heritage online • National Wills Index • nineteenth century • Origins.net • personal workspace • plates • preservation • printed ephemera • ProQuest • Scots Origins • searchsearch toolshare resources • Stuart London • taxonomyUKUniversity of HertfordshireUniversity of LondonUniversity of NottinghamUniversity of Sheffield

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2010

Russell Group: 20 leading UK universities

"The Russell Group represents the 20 leading UK universities which are committed to maintaining the very best research, an outstanding teaching and learning experience and unrivalled links with business and the public sector."

(Russell Group)

[In the UK the Russell Group represent the traditional and 'red brick' universities and the 'Million+ group' represents the new or 'Plate Glass' universities.There is a similar equivalence in Australia between the more traditional 'sandstone universities' and the 'new' or 'Post–1992 universities'.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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