Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'University Of Cambridge' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 OCTOBER 2013

The Raspberry Pi

"The Raspberry Pi is a credit–card sized computer that plugs into your TV and a keyboard. It's a capable little PC which can be used for many of the things that your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word–processing and games. It also plays high–definition video. We want to see it being used by kids all over the world to learn programming."

1

TAGS

20062008 • Alan Mycroft • beginner-friendly • Computer Laboratory (Cambridge) • computer programming • CPU • design and technology • Eben Upton • hardware design • ICT literacy • Jack Lang • learn to codelearning software • mobile device processor • Pete Lomas • pocket-sized circuit boardprogrammable deviceprogrammable mediaprogramming environment • programming experimentation • programming-oriented deviceprototyping platformRaspberry Pi • Raspberry Pi Foundation • Rob Mullins • teaching tooltechnology educationUKUniversity of Cambridge

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2013

Four women share stories from UK computing's early days

"In three clips from past interviews, Joyce Wheeler and Margaret Marrs talk about their time using EDSAC at Cambridge, and Mary Coombs tells of programming LEO, the world's first business computer. And in a fourth brand new film, Dame Stephanie Shirley shares her extraordinary tale of founding Freelance Programmers, one of the UK's first software startups."

(Lynette Webb, 5 September 2013, Google Europe Blog)

1
2
3
4

TAGS

19591962 • business computer • business womencomputer history • computing heritage • computing history • computing industry • Dina St Johnston • EDSAC • electronic computer • Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator (EDSAC) • Freelance Programmers (IT firm) • gender equalityGoogle (GOOG) • Google Europe Blog • history of computing • home office • home working • inspirational stories • Joyce Wheeler • kindertransport • Lyons Electronic Office (LEO) • Margaret Marrs • Mary Coombs • pioneering womenpioneers in computer science • Stephanie Shirley • University of Cambridge • Vaughan Programming Services (IT firm) • women and technologywomen in businesswomen in leadership positionswomen in technologywomen programmers • working from home

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2012

UK Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum

Reviewing the new Design & Technology Curriculum
Westminster Education Forum National Curriculum Seminar Series 2013
Timing: Morning, Wednesday, 13th February 2013
Venue: Central London

"As the Government concludes its National Curriculum review, this timely seminar focuses on the content of the new curriculum for Design and Technology (D&T) for each Key Stage, due to be introduced into schools from September 2014 – as well as the implementation challenges for schools. It will bring together key policymakers with school and college leaders, teaching unions, universities, employers and other stakeholders.

Delegates will assess the opportunities and challenges presented by D&T's designation as a 'foundation' subject, with a much less prescriptive Programme of Study, as well as the level of teaching time required to deliver the new Programme and whether it meets the needs of employers, colleges and universities.

Sessions also focus on wider issues in D&T including the quality of facilities available in both primary and secondary schools in England, the profile and CPD opportunities for D&T teachers and the role that industry can play in the delivery of D&T in schools."

(Westminster Education Forum, UK)

Fig.1 Chicago Middle School students participate in an invention school workshop led by James Dyson as the James Dyson Foundation begins its mission to encourage more American students to become future engineers and inventors, at the Sir Miles Davis Academy in Chicago, May 5, 2011 [http://momandmore.com/2011/05/james–dyson–foundation–just–launched.html].

1

TAGS

20132014 • Academy of Culinary Arts • Bel Reed • Bill Nicholl • CPDcurriculumcurriculum delivery • David Anderson • Department for Education • design and construction • design and technologyDesign and Technology AssociationDesign Council (UK) • DT • EBacceducation policyengineering and designEnglandEnglish Baccalaureate • foundation subject • Gina White • Government • implementation challenges • innovation and creativity • Institution of Mechanical Engineers • Isobel Pollock • IT • key stage • lateral thinking • lobbying • national curriculum • National Curriculum Seminar Series • North Baddesley Junior School • Ofsted • policy makersprimary schoolproblem-solving • programme of study • public policy • purposeful activities • Queen Elizabeths Grammar School • Richard Green • Royal Academy of Engineering • Sara Jayne Stanes • school leaders • secondary school • Susan Smith • synthetic thinkingtechnology educationUKUK GovernmentuniversitiesUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of Leeds • WEET • WEETF • WeF • Westminster Education Forum • Westminster Forum Projects • WFNF • WFP • WHF • Whitehall • WLPF • WMF

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 APRIL 2012

Citations and impact factors are old hat: the Web 2.0 generation needs metrics to match today's scholarship

"As a young academic, I am reliably informed that the landscape of scholarly communication is not what it was 20 years ago. But, despite all that has changed, it seems that we still largely rely upon the same tired and narrow measures of quality and academic impact – namely, citation counts and journal impact factors.

As someone who has used the internet in almost every aspect of their academic work to date, it's hard for me to ignore the fact that these mechanisms, in predating the web, largely ignore its effects.

By holding up these measures as incentives, we appear to have our eye firmly fixed on the hammer and not the nail, adjusting our research habits in order to maximise scores and ignoring issues such as why we publish in the first place."

(Matthew Gamble, 28 July 2011, Times Higher Education)

1

TAGS

academic blogs • academic discussion • academic impactacademic papersacademic work • alt-metrics • alt-metrics community • alt-metrics movement • altmetrics.org • assessing impactassessment of scholarshipblogCERNcitation • citation counts • citation-based measures • citation-based measures of impactdiverse metricsengaged scholars • existing measures • funding decisions • Harvard Universityimpact • impressions of impact • incentive • Internetjournal impact • journal impact factors • journal output • measurementmeasurement of impactMendeleymetricsnarrow measures • narrow measures of academic impact • narrow measures of quality • new measurement frontieronline • online reference-management service • peer review • platform for scholarly communication • practices of scholarly communication • products of scholarly communication • publication of academic papersquantitative study of scholarship • ReaderMeter • readermeter.org • real-time readership • reference manager • research habits • research impactresearch output • Rouse Ball • Samuel Arbesman • scholarly activity • scholarly activity on the web • scholarly communication • scientific discoveries • second scientific revolution • Tim Berners-Lee • timely indications of impact • Timothy Gowers • traces of scholarship • TwitterUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of North Carolina • utility of the web • Web 2.0 • web as a platform • young academics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2010

Russell Group: 20 leading UK universities

"The Russell Group represents the 20 leading UK universities which are committed to maintaining the very best research, an outstanding teaching and learning experience and unrivalled links with business and the public sector."

(Russell Group)

[In the UK the Russell Group represent the traditional and 'red brick' universities and the 'Million+ group' represents the new or 'Plate Glass' universities.There is a similar equivalence in Australia between the more traditional 'sandstone universities' and the 'new' or 'Post–1992 universities'.]

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.