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Which clippings match 'Stereophotography' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 OCTOBER 2015

Taking re-focusable photos with the Lytro Illum camera

"LYTRO ILLUM is the first high-end camera to harness the entire light field – to retain the richness and depth of a scene. Explore focus, perspective, and depth of field within a single image and render full-color, 3-D living pictures. Use the Lytro Desktop application to adjust a wide range of photographic parameters, including the scene's depth of field, and transform those pictures into immersive cinematic animations."

(Lytro, Inc.)

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TAGS

angular variation • camera • depth information • depth of fielddepth of focusdepth-sensing cameradigital cameradirectional information • focal distance • focus spread • image capture • image focus • image sensor • interactive photography • interactive re-focusable pictures • light field • light field camera • light field technology • light rays • light-field photography • live view • living pictures • Lytro Illum • megaray • megaray sensor • mise-en-scenenarrative photographyperspective viewphotography • plenoptic camera • plenoptic image • plenoptic photography • point of focus • post-processing • post-shot refocusing • re-editable • re-focusable • refocus • refocused • refocusing • relative focus • Ren Ng • stereophotography • two-dimensional representation • visual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 OCTOBER 2012

3D Lenticular: the evolution of the gif

"Brooklyn–based trio The Saline Project are best known for creating music videos for the likes of Eminem, 50cent, and The Cure. Now a new art project sees them looking to evolve the gif format to something they're calling 3D lenticular…"

(Gavin Lucas, 25 July 2012)

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3d gif • 3d gifs • 3D lenticular • 50 Centalienanimated gifanimation • Eminem • ghostGIFGIF artistsGIF format • halloween • lenticular imagery • Loch Ness Monster • monster • MVHV • spooky • stereographic • stereophotographystereoscopic • swamp monster • The Cure • The Saline Project • vampire • wolfman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2009

Debunking the myth of 1950's anaglyph 3D movies

"I am an 80 year old retired photographer who has been shooting stereo slides since 1952 with the same Stereo Realist camera. I would like to make a few comments on the current 3D controversy...

The same question applies to most reporter's erroneous belief that the 3D movies of the fifties were anaglyphic and presented through red and blue pieces of cellophane. I cannot think of one first run 3D feature film of the fifties that was presented that way. They were all presented with a two projector system through polarizing filters shown on a silverized screen so as not to depolarize the images. The glasses were also polarizing filters that separated the left and right image. And, when the projectionist did his job properly (which seldom was the case) the 3D image was superb. Cardboard red and blue cellophane filters were usually reserved for cheap 3D ads and comic books. And, it saddens my heart that there are greedy fools around now, ready to present that anaglyphic garbage to young people today who are not familiar with 3D, and suggest that this is what 3D on television is all about. This kind of greedy stupidity will set 3D back several years in the minds of those who are unfamiliar with sterescopic principles. This is what happened in the fifties. Email me and I'll tell you that story."

(Christopher R. Mohr Sr., 24 Jan 2009)

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TAGS

19523Dadanaglyph • anaglyphic • cameracellophanecomic book • David White Company • device • gimmick • innovation • polarising filters • product designspacespatialstereo photography • Stereo Realist • stereophotographystereoscopictechnologytelevisionvisual literacyvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2009

T. Enami: Early Japanese Stereoscopic Photography

"T. Enami (T probably stood for Toshi), whose real name was Nobukuni Enami (or, in Japanese name order, Enami Nobukuni) was a 'photographers photographer' who in his youthful 20s was a student and assistant to K. Ogawa , and then a professional until he died at age 70 in 1929.

His own studio, established in Yokohama in 1892 when he was 33 years old, then passed to his son, Tamotsu (not a photographer), who carried on as a commercial DPE photo processor and printer for locals and tourists, as well as a publisher of his father's photographs."

(Okinawa Soba)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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