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Which clippings match 'James Cameron' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 JUNE 2015

Corman's World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel (2011)

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TAGS

2011 • Alex Stapleton • Allan Arkush • Anders Bramsen • b-moviebad taste • Bjarni Gautur • Bob Burns • Brett Ratner • Bruce Dern • Catherine Hardwicke • Clint Howard • Cormans World (2011) • Darren Lynn Bousman • David Carradine • David Crosby • Dick Miller • documentary • Eli Roth • Eric Balfour • exploitation films • Frances Doel • Francis Ford Coppola • Gale Hurd • Gary Tunnicliffe • Gene Corman • George Hickenlooper • Gregory Locklear • grindhouse • horror film genre • independent film • independent film producer • influential producer • Irvin Kershner • Izabela Frank • Jack NicholsonJames CameronJames Wan • Jeff Frey • Jim Wynorski • Joe Dante • John Sayles • Jonathan Demme • Jonathan Haze • Julie Corman • Kevin O Neill • life and career • Lloyd Kaufman • low-budget film • Marky Ramone • Martin Scorsese • Mary Woronov • Mickey Barold • Monte Hellman • Nancy Sinatra • Oliver Hecks • Pam Grier • Patrick Simpson • Paul Anderson • Paul Bartel • Penelope Spheeris • Peter Bogdanovich • Peter Fonda • Philip Owens • Polly Platt • Quentin TarantinoRichard Matheson • Robert De Niro • Roger Corman • Ron Howard • Sally Kirkland • sensationalismsexploitation • Stone Douglass • teensploitation • Timur Bekmambetov • Tom Sherak • Traci Lords • untasteful • Victor Livingston • William Shatner • writer-director-producer • young talent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JANUARY 2010

Avatar: selective rather than deep focus stereoscopic cinematography

James Cameron: "I think it's a myth that you want deep focus in 3–D shots. I find the opposite is true. Selective focus, created by working at low f–stops with longer lenses, evolved as a cinematic technique to direct the audience's attention to the character of greatest narrative importance at a given moment. With 3–D, the director needs to lead the audience's eye, not let it roam around the screen to areas which are not converged. So all the usual cinematic techniques of selective focus, separation lighting, composition, etc., that one would use in a 2–D film to direct the eye to the subject of interest, still apply, and are perhaps even more important. We all see the world in 3–D. The difference between really being witness to an event vs. seeing it as a stereo image is that when you're really there, your eye can adjust its convergence as it roves over subjects at different distances. Convergence is the natural toe–in that the eye does to align the left and right eye images of objects at specific planes of depth. In a filmed image, the convergence was baked in at the moment of photography, so you can't adjust it. In order to cut naturally and rapidly from one subject to another, it's necessary for the filmmaker (actually his/her camera team) to put the convergence at the place in the shot where the audience is most likely to look. This sounds complicated but in fact we do it all the time, in every shot, and have since the beginning of cinema. It's called focus. We focus where we think people are most likely to look. So I've found that just slaving the convergence function to the focus works exceedingly well, and makes good stereo a no–brainer on the set."

(David S. Cohen, 10 April 2008, Variety Magazine)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2009

'Avatar': James Cameron and Weta Digital

"As he sought collaborators to help him realize his ambitious vision for 'Avatar,' director James Cameron found kindred spirits at Weta Digital, the effects company co–founded by Peter Jackson.

The partnership goes back years, to when Cameron and Jackson met to talk shop after the latter's 'Lord of the Rings' wrapped. Senior visual effects supervisor Joe Letteri was also at that meeting, and told Cameron about the computer–animation techniques Weta was developing for Jackson's 'King Kong.'

'Jim was interested in what we were doing with 'Kong,' says Letteri, via phone from Weta headquarters in Wellington, New Zealand. 'He knew we were about to embark on something where we had a lead actor who was a digital creation. Plus we were getting into building these big jungles. I think Jim, in the back of his mind, that's the kind of thing he had in his head for 'Avatar.' '

Based upon an original idea that Cameron dreamed up more than a decade ago, 'Avatar,' which opens Friday [December 2009], is set 4.4 light–years away on a moon called Pandora. The moon is home to an alien species known as Na'vi, blue humanoids towering 10 feet. Colonists from Earth can only explore the hostile habitat as avatars –– remote–controlled replicants modelled after the Na'vi.

'The idea is that you're seeing this whole world through new eyes,' explains Letteri, a three–time Oscar–winner. 'It's unfolding before you, the idea that you get to this planet and you think it's this hellhole but as you gradually start to learn what it's all about, you realize that there's this amazing and beautiful but still quite harsh world out there. It seemed like it had all kinds of possibilities.'

Weta was responsible for turning Cameron's sketches of Pandora into 3–D panoramas and also transforming stars Sam Worthington and Zoe Saldana into alien figures convincing enough to carry a love story"

(Lisa Rose/The Star–Ledger, 17 December 2009, NJ.com)

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TAGS

20093DAotearoa New ZealandavatarAvatar filmCGIcomputer-animationdigital • ILM • Industrial Light & Magic • innovationJames Cameron • Joe Letteri • King Kong • Lightstorm Entertainment • Lord of the Rings • Na'vi • Pandora • Peter JacksonRealDRealD 3Dscience-fictionSFXstereoscopictechnologyvisual effectsvisualisationWellington • Weta • Weta Digital

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2009

The Digital Stereoscopic Renaissance: Moving from the Artistic Ghettos to the Centre Spotlight of Hollywood Production

"Stereo projection throughout the 1980s and 1990s has often been accomplished with large format film projectors, especially Imax. But because of the high cost and complexity of stereo projection and of 65mm film prints, stereo projection was a niche product. And 35mm stereo projection equipment is just as complicated and unappealing to the average theatre owner as is 65mm stereo.

Digital stereo projection is different. The Real D system works with very little modification to the existing Texas Instruments DLP digital projectors that are becoming increasingly common even in neighbourhood theatres. And because these digital DLP projectors already have a beautiful image similar to film prints (minus film print cost and wear and tear), the combination of Real D stereo and the TI DLP digital projector makes lots of artistic and financial sense for the Hollywood studios and exhibitors. Real D uses circular polarizers instead of the older linear glasses, so the stereo effect isn't lost if the audience member tilts their head. Problems with colour casts from the polarizing glasses have also been improved.

Not to be out done, Imax and Dolby are introducing their own digital stereoscopic projection systems for the general public. And Imax stereo analogue film projection continues to be very popular."

(Michael Karp, Student Filmmaker Magazine v.1.1)

Fig.1 Making of documentary about T2 3–D: Battle Across Time, 1996;
Fig.2 Using twin 65mm Showscan/Panavision cameras to film T2 3–D: Battle Across Time.

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199635mm3D65mmanaglyphcameracinema • cyan • digitaldigital cinemaDolbyfilmHollywoodillusionIMAXinnovationJames CameronPanavision • parallax • projector • Real D • RealDRealD 3D • RealD 3D cinema • RealD Cinema • Showscan • stereo projection • stereoscopic • T2 • T2-3D • technology • Terminator • Terminator 2 • Texas Instruments • Texas Instruments DLP • The Terminator

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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