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Which clippings match '1986' keyword pg.1 of 3
28 NOVEMBER 2014

Videographer uses drone to capture footage of Pripyat, Chernobyl

"Some tragedies never end. Ask people to name a nuclear disaster and most will probably point to Fukushima in Japan three years ago. The nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl in Ukraine was 30 years ago, but the crisis is still with us today. That's because radiation virtually never dies. After the explosion in 1986, the Soviets built a primitive sarcophagus, a tomb to cover the stricken reactor. But it wasn't meant to last very long and it hasn't. Engineers say there is still enough radioactive material in there to cause widespread contamination. For the last five years a massive project has been underway to seal the reactor permanently. But the undertaking is three quarters of a billion dollars short and the completion date has been delayed repeatedly. Thirty years later, Chernobyl's crippled reactor still has the power to kill."

(Bob Simon, 23 November 2014, CBS News)

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TAGS

19862014 • 60 Minutes • abandoned places in Eastern Europebarren land • Bob Simon • building and ruinsCanon 7DCBS NewsChernobylcontaminationdangerous placesDanny Cookedeserted places • desolate • desolate space • devastated place • devastation • DJI Phantom 2 • droneFukushima • ghost town • GoPro • Hannah Miller • liminal space • neglected land • no mans landnon-placenuclear disaster • nuclear meltdown • nuclear reactor • overgrown • physical destructionplaceless placeplacelessnesspreservationPripyatquadcopterradiation • radioactive material • ruin • ruinssarcophagustime capsuletombUkraine • urban desert • videographer • wasteland

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2012

Blue Velvet: the dark underside of America's collective fantasies

"Blue Velvet begins with the lily–white small town of America's collective fantasies and shows us its dark underside: drugs, violence, sex, and particularly sexual perversion. Our hero, Jeffrey, hiding in the dark, peers through the slats of Dorothy Vallens' closet at Dorothy getting undressed and Frank's strange sadomasochistic sex with her. Jeffrey stands for all of us American filmgoers peering (voyeuristically!) at Evil in traditional American films. Lynch clues us as to how we should read his film when he shows us a cluster of ants under the Beaumonts' pretty lawn. This is Tennyson's nature red in tooth and claw–the underside of cutesy Lumberton with its free enterprise propensity for cutting down trees."

(Norman N. Holland)

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TAGS

1986 • Alfred Tennyson • ants • Blue Velvet (1986) • collective fantasies • communitydark undersideDavid Lynch • Dennis Hopper • Dorothy Vallens • drugs • evil in films • feature filmfilm • filmgoers peering • free enterprise • hiding in the dark • Isabella Rossellini • Kyle MacLachlan • Laura Dern • lily-white • Lumberton • melodramanature • pretty lawn • repressionsadomasochistic sexsexsexual perversionsmall townsmall town Americasocietyundercurrents • underside • violencevisual spectaclevoyeurism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2012

How Apple Invented The Future (and the iPad) in 1986

"While most attribute the iPad's success to Steve Jobs' genius, its roots extend much deeper into Apple's history of creativity and innovation. That's because Apple laid out an amazingly prescient vision of the iPad in 1987. That earlier effort was a guiding beacon for Apple's culture and research for a decade during Job's exile. It helped secure the ingredients that Jobs would mold into the world's most valuable company. And, it defined the personal computing model that technology titans, including Apple, Google, Amazon, and Microsoft, are fighting to deliver and dominate today."

(Chunka Mui, 24 October 2011)

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TAGS

1986Alan KayApple Computer • Bonnie MacBird • commodity enabler • computational power • Cray Inc • Cray XMP 48 • digitised information • Doris Mitch • envisioning • far-fetched idea • future casting • general purpose personal computer • Hugh Dubberlyinnovative technologyinteractive multimedia • John Sculley • knowledge applications • Knowledge Navigator (1988) • Moores Law • multidimensional objects • Pepsi Generation • percolating • processing power • real time manipulation • Siri • smart agents • speculative design • super computer • three-dimensional geometries • video simulation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MARCH 2012

Babakiueria: the colonialisation of European Australians by Indigenous Australians

"Presenter Duranga Manika (Michelle Torres) describes her fascination with white people and their customs and explains how she spent six months living with a 'typical white family' (Tony Barry, Cecily Polson, Kelan Angel, Margeurita Haynes). She also asks members of the general public for their opinions on white people and speaks to the Minister for White Affairs (Bob Maza).

[Geoffrey] Atherden's script takes stereotypes of Australian culture and, with tongue–in–cheek humour, views them as though for the first time, as mysterious, alien and strange. Here, the barbecue is singled out. Elsewhere Manika describes the football match as ritualised violence and betting at the TAB as a religion, while a police commissioner calls the Anzac Day March a ritual where white people 'honour their warrior ancestors' but wonders why it can't be done at home.

Presenter Duranga Manika's ethnographic study of white people simplifies, patronises and mystifies her subjects. Every mundane detail of this one family's everyday life is invested with serious cultural significance. Bob Maza's Minister for White Affairs compresses a history of government treatment of Indigenous Australians into one self–satisfied, authoritative figure. It is interesting that while these characters treat 'white' culture with such fascination, they treat 'black' culture as such a given that the audience does not find out much about it."

(Kate Matthews, Australian Screen)

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TAGS

17881986Aboriginalalien and strangeANZAC • ANZAC Day • ASO • audio and visual heritageaudiovisual archiveAustraliaAustralian cultureAustralian Screen • authoritative figure • Babakiueria • barbecue • Barbecue area • BBQ • belongingblack culture • Bob Maz • Bob Maza • Cecily Polson • colonial misrecognition • colonisationcultural anthropologycultural critiquecultural perspectivecultural significanceculture and customsethicsethnographic studyethnography • Euro-Australians • European Australians • fictitious land • First Australiansflagfootball • for their own good • gambling • Geoffrey Atherden • government treatment • humourIndigenousIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous peopleinvasion • Kelan Angel • Margeurita Haynes • Michelle Torres • Minister for White Affairs • mockumentary • National Film and Sound Archivenative peopleNFSApatronisingpostcolonial • powerboat • racial inequality • racial profiling • religionritual • ritualised violence • role-reversal • satiresatiricalsettlementstereotype • TAB • tongue-in-cheek • Tony Barry • typical white family • untamed land • white culture • white people • white settlement

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2011

Guardian rehires 'Skinhead' agency

"BMP [Boase Massimi Pollitt] was the Guardian's advertising agency in the mid–80s, when it created one of the most famous British adverts of all time for the newspaper.

The 1986 commercial featured a skinhead who appeared to be wrestling a man's briefcase from his hands. But the camera then cuts and viewers see that he is in fact trying to rescue the man from falling bricks.

'We had some inspirational pitches over the last few weeks but BMP's work really stood out,' said Marc Sands, Guardian Newspapers marketing director.

'Their intuitive understanding of our brands and the demands placed upon them was impressive. We look forward to some fantastic work springing from a genuine partnership.'

BMP will create advertising for the Guardian Unlimited websites as well as for the Guardian newspaper."

(Claire Cozens, 21 December 2000)

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1980s1986advertisingadvertising agency • BMP (advertising agency) • Boase Massimi Pollitt • briefcase • Britishcamera anglefalsehood of images • Guardian Newspapers • Guardian Unlimitedperspectivepoint of viewskinheadThe GuardianThe Whole Picturetruth of perceptiontv adwhole is greater than the sum of the parts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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