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Which clippings match 'Talent' keyword pg.1 of 2
28 DECEMBER 2013

Design genius or author as editor: filtering and synthesising?

"In 'What is an author?' [4], Michel Foucault says we are 'accustomed to presenting the author as a genius.' We see the author as the 'genial creator' of work in which he gives us, 'with infinite wealth and generosity,' an inexhaustible world of meanings. (Being 'creative' always has a positive ring, whatever is produced!) Foucault says that the author does not 'precede' the work: ideas and meanings are already there and the author's role is to 'choose,' to filter and synthesise to create output. (Foucault also emphasises 'limiting' and 'excluding'). The author's role is to limit the proliferation of meanings and present a personal view of the world. Yet the 'genius author' is represented as a continual source of invention–the opposite of his genuine function."

(Monika Parrinder, 2000, Eye Magazine)

TAGS

April Greiman • art and designart market • art star • artisanartist • artist myth • artistic solutions • Atelier Populaire • auteur theoryauthor as editorauthor as geniusavant-garde artists • being creative • blur boundaries • bohemian • Brigit Fowler • Bruce Mau • canonisation • celebritycliche • constructed idea • creative geniuscreative individuals • creative intuition • cult of the author • cult of the individual • cultural elite • Cunst Art • cutting-edge innovationsDavid Carsondesign community • Design Quarterly • design star • designer as author • editing through selectionEuropean EnlightenmentEye (magazine)fine art • Fran Cottell • genial creatorgenius • genius author • genius creator • genius mythgenius of the individual • genius status • graphic authorship • graphic design • Griselda Pollock • Hard Werken • history of ideas • ID Magazine • ingenue • innate talent • inspired visionaries • intuitioninventionJohn Maeda • John Walker • legitimate discipline • liberal artslone genius • lone pioneer • madman • maverick graphic designer • Michael Howe • Michael RockMichel Foucaultmodernismmyth of the geniusNeville Brodynon-conformist • ordinary mortal • Paul RandPentagram Designpersonapersonal expressionpersonal visionpersonalityPeter SavillePierre Bourdieupioneerromantic notion of the artist • Rozsika Parker • self-aggrandisement • self-taught • semi-divine status • solitary • spiritual insight • status • talenttaste (sociology) • Terry Jones • Tomato (design agency)tortured soul • ubermeister • visionary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

Human communities depend upon a diversity of talent

"One of the real challenges is to innovate fundamentally in education. Innovation is hard because it means doing something that people don't find very easy, for the most part. It means challenging what we take for granted, things that we think are obvious. The great problem for reform or transformation is the tyranny of common sense; things that people think, 'Well, it can't be done any other way because that's the way it's done.'"

(Ken Robinson, February 2010)

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TAGS

2010 • ability • Abraham Lincoln • Al Gorebatching people • broken model • common sense • conception of abilityconformitydigitised world • disenthrall • diversity of talent • dogma • education dislocates • education innovationeducation reform • education revolution • education system • Eric Clapton • fast food model • having original ideas that have value • human communities • human development • human flourishing • human resourcesindustrial model of educationintelligence • Jamie Oliver • Jeremy BenthamKen Robinson • kindergarten • learning revolutionlinearity • live for the weekend • manufacturing model • Maud Gonne • mechanical process • Natalie Merchant • natural talents • order of things • organic process • our talents • pre-digital culture • previous centuries • quiet past • rise with the occasion • single function device • standardisation • stormy present • take for granted • talentTED TalksteenagerWilliam Butler Yeats • wristwatch • Zagat

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

The talent myth: how to maximise your creative potential

"Most of us grow up being taught that talent is an inheritance, like brown hair or blue eyes. Therefore, we presume that the surest sign of talent is early, instant, effortless success, ie, being a prodigy. In fact, a well–established body of research shows that that assumption is false. Early success turns out to be a weak predictor of long–term success.

Many top performers are overlooked early on, then grow quietly into stars. This list includes Charles Darwin (considered slow and ordinary by teachers), Walt Disney (fired from an early job because he 'lacked imagination'), Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, Paul Gauguin, Thomas Edison, Leo Tolstoy, Fred Astaire, Winston Churchill, Lucille Ball, and so on. One theory, put forth by Dr Carol Dweck of Stanford University, is that the praise and attention prodigies receive leads them to instinctively protect their 'magical' status by taking fewer risks, which eventually slows their learning.

The talent hotbeds are not built on identifying talent, but on constructing it. They are not overly impressed by precociousness and do not pretend to know who will succeed. While I was visiting the US Olympic Training Centre at Colorado Springs, I asked a roomful of 50 experienced coaches if they could accurately assess a top 15–year–old's chances of winning a medal in the Games two years from then? Only one coach raised his hand.

If you have early success, do your best to ignore the praise and keep pushing yourself to the edges of your ability, where improvement happens. If you don't have early success, don't quit. Instead, treat your early efforts as experiments, not as verdicts."

(Daniel Coyle, 25 August 2012, The Independent)

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TAGS

Albert EinsteinattentionCarol DweckCharles Darwin • coach • Colorado Springs • constructing talent • creative potential • early success • effortless success • Fred Astaire • inheritance • instant success • Leo Tolstoylong-term successLouis Pasteur • Lucille Ball • magical status • Olympic Games 2012 • Olympic medal • Paul Gauguin • perseverance • praise • precociousness • prodigy • risk averserisk-takingStanford Universitytalent • talent hotbed • talent myth • Thomas Edison • top performers • US Olympic Training Centre • Walt DisneyWinston Churchill

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 AUGUST 2012

PressPausePlay: does democratised culture mean better art, film, music and literature?

"The digital revolution of the last decade has unleashed creativity and talent of people in an unprecedented way, unleashing unlimited creative opportunities.

But does democratized culture mean better art, film, music and literature or is true talent instead flooded and drowned in the vast digital ocean of mass culture? Is it cultural democracy or mediocrity?

This is the question addressed by PressPausePlay, a documentary film containing interviews with some of the world's most influential creators of the digital era."

(House of Radon)

Fig.1 "PressPausePlay" (2011) [http://www.houseofradon.com/]

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TAGS

2011 • Adam Watson • amateur cultural productionamateurism • Amy Phillips • Andre de Ridder • Andre Stringer • Andrew Keen • Anne Hilde Neset • Anthony Volodkin • Apparat • artistic process • Bill Drummond • Brenda Walker • Christopher Weingarten • consumer co-creationcreativitycultural democracy • David Girhammar • David Weinberger • democratised culturedigital eradigital revolutiondocumentary • Georgia Taglietti-Sonar • Hank Shocklee • Hillary Rosen • Hot Chip (group) • House of Radon (agency) • influential creatorsinformation wants to be freeJimi Hendrix • Jonas Woost • Katie Johnson • Keith Harris • Lena Dunham • Lykke Li • mass culturemasterymastery of toolsmediocrity • Mike Cosola • Moby • Nick Sansano • Norman Hollyn • Olafur Arnalds • originality • PressPausePlay • produserremix cultureRip Mix BurnRobyn • Robyn Carlsson • Scott Belsky • Sean Parker • Seth Godin • Shen Lihiu • Takafumi Tsuchiya • talent • Ted Schilowitz • Toby Smith • unlimited creative opportunities • Xiang Xaing • Yasuhiko Fukuzono • Zach Hancock

CONTRIBUTOR

Chris Thorby
15 APRIL 2012

Ken Robinson: human ability and talent is highly diverse

"Yes you know there's this view that only special people are creative and it's not me. It's not it's not anybody I really know. It's a very isolated sort of genius you know to be really creative. And you know people doubt their own strengths and their own capacities. So I meet all kind of people who don't really get much fulfilment from the work they do. You know they just get through it and wait for the weekend. But I also meet people who love what they do. And couldn't imagine doing anything else. You know if you set and don't this anymore they wouldn't' know what you were talking about because this is who they are. You know I mean like I don't know what else I would do. They are so to speak in their element. And so the book is about that. It's about the journeys people took to discover their own talents and what difference it made in their lives. And I talk to all kinds of people. It's not just interviews. But the book is seasoned as you know with interviews with people in science in business in the arts in sports in technology all kinds of different fields and what's interesting to me is of course it's different for everybody and this is really a key point you know that human ability and talent is highly diverse. You know what turns somebody on might totally turn somebody else off. What excites some propel does not excite other people and I know when I am signing the book these days I always ask people what they do. And when they tell me I ask them if they like it. And I always think it's great when people say I love it. Because you just never [inaudible].'"

(Ken Robinson, Conversations from Penn State)

Fig.1 Conversations from Penn State Episode 207: Sir Ken Robinson, Uploaded by WPSU TV/FM/Online on 6 Nov 2010, YouTube.

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TAGS

2010 • all kinds of different fields • American schools • auditory learning • being really creative • career journeycareer narrativeconformity • Conversations from Penn State • creative capacity • creative capacity developmentcreativityeducation innovationeducation reformeducation systemgeniusgenius of the individualget a jobhuman resourcesisolated sort of geniusKen Robinson • kinaesthetic learning • kinesthetic learninglearning styleslone genius • no child left behind • only special people are creative • pathologized • Patty Satalia • PBSpedagogic codepedagogy • Penn State • PennState • Pennsylvania • psychologically abnormal • school systemsschoolingSingaporesocial construction of knowledgestandardisationstandardised testingstatistics can tell you most thingsSTEMstudenttailored curriculumtailoring curriculumtalent • talent is highly diverse • teaching to the test • three types of learners • University of Warwickvisual learning • WPSU

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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