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Which clippings match 'Online Video' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 JULY 2012

Veengle: online tool for creating video compilations

"You can create video compilations and share it with friends. You can share your created videos almost anywhere (e.g. to your website, your blog, other social networking websites).

During Beta stage, Veengle will handle only youtube videos. When the full version is ready, users will be able to upload their videos directly to Veengle."

(Veengle)

[It's a great little tool - despite it's amateur interface aesthetics.]

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amalgamationappropriationauthoring toolauthorshipcompilationcontent integrationmedia amalgamationminglemixingmixtapemultimediamultimedia authoring toolonline toolonline video • parsing • re-purposesharingstitchedstitched togethertool • Veengle • video clipvideo clipsvideo collage • video compilation • video compilations • video creationvideo editingvideo mixing • video mixtape • video sequence • video sharingvideo synthesisweb applicationYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2011

Open Video Alliance: futuring participatory culture

"As internet video matures, we face a crossroads: will technology and public policy support a more participatory culture - one that encourages and enables free expression and broader cultural engagement? Will video be woven into the fabric of the open web? Or will online video become a glorified TV-on-demand service? Open Video is a movement to promote free expression and innovation in online video through open standards, open source, and sharing."

(Open Video Alliance)

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authorshipbest practices • bottom-up innovation • censorship • centralised distribution • CODECcontent distributioncopyrightcultural engagementdecentralisationdigital cultureDIYend-usersfair usefilmmakersfree expressionfree speech • iCommons • internet video • interoperabilityinteroperable technologies • Kaltura • legality • media consolidation • online videoopen codecsopen sourceopen standardsopen video • Open Video Alliance • open video ecosystem • open webownershipparticipatory culture • Participatory Culture Foundation • proprietaryproprietary technologiespublic policyregulationremix culture • remixers • scriptiblesharingsocial normstechnical innovationtechnologists • TV-on-demand • video artistsvideo creation • video creators • Yale Internet Society Project • YouTubers • YT

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 APRIL 2011

Google is shutting down Google Video

"It's not much of a surprise that Google has opted to wind things down with Google Video, considering Google owns YouTube, which according to comScore's January figures, is the number one online video content property with 144.1 million unique viewers per month. Google launched Google Video in 2005, and purchased YouTube the following year. Additionally, Google stopped accepting uploads to Google video a few years ago.

So what will happen to videos hosted on the site? Google is asking that users move their content over to YouTube.

'Later this month, hosted video content on Google Video will no longer be available for playback,' read an email sent to Google Video users. 'Google Video stopped taking uploads in May 2009 and now we're removing the remaining hosted content. We've always maintained that the strength of Google Video is its ability to let people search videos from across the Web, regardless of where those videos are hosted. And this move will enable us to focus on developing these technologies further to the benefit of searchers worldwide.'"

(Leslie Horn, 17 April 17 2011, PC Magazine)

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200520062009cessationcontentGoogle IncGoogle Video • hosted content • online video • playback • uploads • videoYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 DECEMBER 2009

Feature Film: A 'You Tube Narrative Model'?

"Will the You-Tube revolution foster a new narrative model for feature film? Perhaps it's too early to say. But then again, given the rapid proliferation of the online video portal (launched barely a year ago) it's worth thinking about. To date, most discussion on You Tube centres on its relationship with television. However, there are also signs of ‘cross-pollination' with the cinema: from the very, very small screen to the big screen.

Scriptwriting author Ken Dancyger says that new ‘narrative models' develop against a background of technological innovation, to provide 'narrative experience that re-establishes its connectivity with its audience' (127). Premonitions of a ‘You Tube Narrative Model' can be considered in relation to Dancyger's ‘MTV Model': the feature film as an assemblage of ‘set-pieces' which appropriate both the structure (2-4 minutes) and aesthetic (high production values/rapid montage) of the music video (132). He points to Natural Born Killers (Oliver Stone, 1994) as an example.

But this earlier brand of (80s-90s) postmodern excess has mutated in the new media environment – and new narrative models beckon. "

(Alex Munt, 7 June 2007, FlowTV)

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1994Australiaconvergence • cross-pollination • culturedigital cultureinnovation • Ken Dancyger • Macquarie UniversitymediumMTVmusic video • narrative model • Natural Born Killersnew mediaold mediaonline videoportalPostmoderntechnological innovationtechnologyvisual communicationvisual languagevisual literacyYouTube • YouTube narrative mode

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 NOVEMBER 1999

Active Ingredient: Make TV to Watch TV

"Merging live video with a social networking environment, MakeTV constructed a live programme of self moderated videos, 15 minutes of fame where every audience member could be a producer of content, and anyone anywhere could be the audience. Active Ingredient designed the time loop where 48 hour rotating live programme could be added to, viewed and recorded.

Active Ingredient hosted several events that used MakeTV as a new space for artists, which included the ongoing collaboration with Trampoline and the Radiator Festival, Sideshow (A Brit Art fringe event), Dislocate and Nottingham Trent University. The programme included new works developed for MakeTV by artists who had worked with Active Ingredient through Moon Radio webTV, since 2000 including: Jordan McKenzie, Sophia Lycouris, Frank Abbott, Sarah Thom and Elyce Semenac, Gareth Howell and Jeanie Finlay.

With the advent of YouTube, Skype and Live video conferencing online, everything changed and finally anyone could have access to online video. The Internet is now full of opportunities for artists making video work. MakeTV is no longer live, as Active Ingredient moved their focus and resources towards making their own work."

(Rachel Jacobs and Matt Watkins)

Note that the URL (http://www.make-tv.net) for the site is no longer active.

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2006Active Ingredient (collective)broadcastcommunity • Elyce Semenac • Frank Abbott • Gareth Howell • independent cultural initiatives • Jeanie Finlay • Jordan McKenzie • Little Big Head • livelive streaming video platformlive video • Lizzy Whirrity • make-tv.net • MakeTV • Matt Watkins • Moon Radio webTV • narrowcastingnew forms of distribution and presentationNottingham Trent Universityonline televisiononline videoproduser • Rachel Jacobs • Radiator FestivalRadiator Festival for New Technology Art • Sarah Thom • self-moderated • Sideshow (Brit Art fringe event) • Skype • Sophia Lycouris • space for artists • streaming media servicestreaming serviceTrampoline (arts organisation)TVvideo creationvideo on the webvideo publishingYouTube
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