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Which clippings match 'Digital Age' keyword pg.1 of 3
26 SEPTEMBER 2014

Rethinking Intermediality in the Digital Age

"In the past decades 'intermediality' has proved to be one of the most productive terms in the domain of humanities. Although the ideas regarding media connections may be traced back to the poetics of the Romantics or even further back in time, it was the accelerated multiplication of media themselves becoming our daily experience in the second half of the twentieth century that propelled the term to a wide attention in a great number of fields (communication and cultural studies, philosophy, theories of literature and music, art history, cinema studies, etc.) where it generated an impressive number of analyses and theoretical discussions. 'Intermediality is in' ('Intermedialität ist in'), declared one of its pioneering theorists, Joachim Paech, at the end of the 1990s. However, we may also note, that since then other theoretical approaches introduced even newer perspectives that have not only revitalized the study of media phenomena in general but have specifically targeted the emerging new problematics raised by the new electronic media. Facing the challenge of the daily experiences of the digital age, discussions of media differences or 'dialogues' highlighting the 'inter,' the 'gap,' the 'in–between,' the 'incommensurability' between media are currently being replaced by discourses of the 'enter' or 'immersion,' and the 'network logic' of a 'convergence culture' in which we have a 'free flow of content over different media platforms' (Henry Jenkins). At the same time the turn towards the corporeality of perception in all aspects of communication has also shifted the attention from the 'interaction of media' towards the 'interaction with media,' from the idea of 'media borders' towards the analysis of the blurring of perception between media and reality, of humans and machines – media being perceived more and more not as a form of representation but as an environment and as a means to 'augment' reality."

The inaugural conference of ISIS (International Society for Intermedial Studies / former NorSIS) Cluj–Napoca, October 24–26, 2013. Conference venue: Sapientia University, Calea Turzii nr. 4.

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2013 • augment reality • augmented reality • between media • Cluj-Napoca • convergence culture • corporeality of perception • digital age • discussions of media differences • emerging new problematics • form of representation • Henry Jenkinshumans and machinesimmersion • incommensurability • interaction of media • interaction with media • intermediality • International Society for Intermedial Studies • Joachim Paech • Marie-Laure Ryan • media and reality • media borders • media phenomena • media platforms • multiple delivery platforms • multiplication of media • narrative theory • network logic • new electronic media • Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvaniatransmedia storytelling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2014

Lost in Translation: The Problem with Email

"'If you think of culture as just kind of the sum total of the relationships that colleagues have with each other, the thing about email is, it does literally nothing to build those relationships and is more likely to actually damage whatever connective tissue there is in the first place,' says Bryant.

Maybe it's time to pick up the phone. Or better yet, try stopping by someone's office to have a quick chat. It's amazing how much more polite and understanding people are when they're not hiding behind a keyboard."

(Adam Bryant, The Big Think, Inc.)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 DECEMBER 2013

Connectivist Learning Theory

"A central tenet of most learning theories is that learning occurs inside a person. Even social constructivist views, which hold that learning is a socially enacted process, promotes the principality of the individual (and her/his physical presence–i.e. brain–based) in learning. These theories do not address learning that occurs outside of people (i.e. learning that is stored and manipulated by technology)... In a networked world, the very manner of information that we acquire is worth exploring. The need to evaluate the worthiness of learning something is a meta–skill that is applied before learning itself begins. When knowledge is subject to paucity, the process of assessing worthiness is assumed to be intrinsic to learning. When knowledge is abundant, the rapid evaluation of knowledge is important. The ability to synthesize and recognize connections and patterns is a valuable skill. Including technology and connection making as learning activities begins to move learning theories into a digital age. We can no longer personally experience and acquire learning that we need to act. We derive our competence from forming connections. Karen Stephenson states: 'Experience has long been considered the best teacher of knowledge. Since we cannot experience everything, other people's experiences, and hence other people, become the surrogate for knowledge. 'I store my knowledge in my friends' is an axiom for collecting knowledge through collecting people.

Connectivism is the integration of principles explored by chaos, network, and complexity and self–organization theories"

(George Siemens, P2P Foundation)

TAGS

accepted knowledge • Albert Bandura • Albert-Laszlo Barabasi • Andrew Clark • Brent Davis • Chris Jones • collective knowledge • complexity of views • connection forming • connections and patterns • connectivism • conventional wisdom • Dave Cormier • David Rumelhart • David Wileydigital age • embodied cognition • Ernst von GlasersfeldEtienne Wengerevaluate and select • evaluate worthiness • evaluation skills • Gavriel Salomon • George Siemens • heedful interrelating • I store my knowledge with my friendsindividualismisolated individualJames Gibson • James McClelland • Jean Lave • Jerome Bruner • Karen Stephenson • Karl Weick • know-how • know-what • know-who • knowledge collectionknowledge commons • knowledge evaluation • knowledge synthesis • learning is socially enacted • learning theory • Lev VygotskyLudwig Wittgenstein • Mark Mason • Marshall McLuhan • Martin de Laat • Marvin Minsky • meta-analysismetacognition • Michael Spivey • Neil Postmannetwork societynetworked world • networks are everywhere • P2P Foundation • patterns of connections • patterns of knowledgepaucity • Paul Churchland • recognition rules • Ronald Barnett • Roy Pea • self-organisation theories • self-organising systemsensemaking • Seymour Papert • shared knowledge • shared learning interests • situated learning • social cognitive theory • social construction of knowledge • social learning theory • social-constructivist approach • Starr-Roxanne Hiltz • systems thinkingwicked problems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2013

Overt technological change witnesses an enduring tradition

"In 2005, visitors packed into the expansive boulevard leading up to St. Peter's Square as Pope John Paul II's body was carried into the crowd for public viewing in the days following his death. Taken nearly two years before the iPhone debuted, the photo is striking now for its appearance straight out of another era.

For anyone who has ever been to a concert, the photo at bottom, taken Tuesday night as Pope Francis made his inaugural appearance on the Vatican balcony, seems almost ordinary. The two, taken together, reflect a world changing, even as some ancient traditions stay the same."

(Carlo Dellaverson, 13 March 2013, NBC News)

Fig.1 Luca Bruno / AP, The faithful gather in 2005 near St. Peter's to witness Pope John Paul II's body being carried into the Basilica for public viewing.

Fig.2 Michael Sohn / AP, St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, on March 13, 2013.

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20052013ancient traditions • another era • ArgentinacacophonyCatholic • Catholic leader • changing behaviourschanging timeschanging worldChristian • concert • digital ageelectronic ageinaugural addressiPhone • Jorge Mario Bergoglio • mobile phone • NBC News • participative mediaphotoPopePope Francis • Pope John Paul II • ritual • St Peters Square • symbolic behaviourtradition • Vatican City • visitors

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 NOVEMBER 2012

Skillset Academi+ supporting the Welsh creative industries

"Skillset Academi+ was first piloted in Wales from 2009 to March 2011, during which time the scheme assisted over 350 industry professionals by running 54 courses. Having used this opportunity, which was funded by HEFCW, the Academy has fostered new partnerships with experts and has proven a track record of targeted training appealing to a wide cross sector of the industry. In 2012, the second phase of training will be funded by the EU's Convergence European Social Fund (ESF) through the Welsh Government. ...

The impact of digital technology, combined with the recession, has increased the speed of change within the Creative industry, transforming the way in which we operate. The focus of Skillset Academi+ is to enable Welsh companies and freelancers to re–skill through high quality and flexible training that is entirely tailored towards real industry needs in this digital age.

The concept for this training programme draws on hard evidence produced by Skillset on the impact of the recession and changes in digital technology on the Creative Media sector in Wales. Recently gathered research shows which skills are needed to help companies and freelancers weather the economic downturn and come out the other side with a competitive edge.

The content of courses offered by Skillset Academi+ has been shaped by feedback from industry practitioners on priority skills gaps and training needs."

(Skillset Academi+)

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2012 • Aberystwyth University • Cardiff Metropolitan University • changes in digital technology • competitive edge • Convergence European Social Fund • CPDcreative industriescreative media industries • creative media sector • Creative Skillsetdigital agedigital technologyeconomic downturneconomic recession • ESF • flexible training • freelancers • HEFCW • impact of the recession • industry needs • industry practitioners • industry professionals • re-skill • skills gaps • Skillset Academi+ • speed of change • Swansea Metropolitan University • targeted training • the way we operate • training • training needs • University of Wales Newport • upskill • Wales • Welsh Government

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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