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12 DECEMBER 2013

Digital Bolex: 16mm Filmmaking Goes Digital

"Most film students now use DSLRs. But for those who want a digital tool to produce more film–like images, Bolex – one of the classic 16mm camera makers – recently started shipping a digital 16mm–equivalent video camera that's fully compatible with the most desirable vintage C–mount lenses.

The new Bolex camera, dubbed the D16, doesn't just sport a retro look. Its Kodak–produced CCD sensor is very close to Super 16–sized, which is uncommon in modern cameras. Even better, that sensor shoots in RAW at 32 frames per second at a resolution of 2048x1152 pixels. Every uncompressed frame should be sharp, as opposed to the compressed footage even full–frame DSLRs produce. Plus, the Super 16–sized sensor means that the D16 can use C–mount lenses without any crop factor.

The camera is being produced under the name 'Digital Bolex,' but it's actually a joint venture between the original manufacturer, Bolex International, S.A., and Cinemeridian, Inc, a young company of digital wizards that was formed to bring this idea to fruition."

(Kif Leswing, 11 December 2013, Wired.com)

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16mm • 16mm-equivalent • 2012 • 32 fps • Blackmagic • Bolex • Bolex camera • Bolex D16 • Bolex International S.A. • C-mount lens • camera • camera maker • camera technology • CCD sensor • cinematic devices • Cinemeridian Inc • classic 16mm camera • compressed footage • D16 • digital • Digital Bolex • digital cameradigital cinema technologydigital pictures • digital tool • digital viewfinder • DSLR • film and video equipment • film camera • film school • film-like images • ilm grain • image qualityindependent cinemaindie filmmaker • joint venture • KickstarterKodak • moviemaking • old-school • pistol grip • RAW • retro look • sensor • Serious Cinema • stereo audio • Super 16mm • test footage • uncompressed frame • video camera • XLR

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2012

Glitch art: created purposefully through databending and corruption

"Data glitches are unavoidable. As technology gets more complex, it's easier and easier for a small bug to creep in and ruin your perfect data. But a growing number of artists in different fields are coming to value these glitches, and have begun attempting to insert them purposefully into their work using a technique called 'databending'.

'Glitch art' is a term that there's some debate over: Many argue that it can only apply when a glitch is unintentional –– when it occurs naturally due to an error in hardware or software that leads to the corruption of whatever it is the artist was trying to create.

But there are ways of intentionally inducing some of these glitches, a process called 'databending'. Databending draws its name from the practice of circuit bending –– a practice where childrens' toys, cheap keyboards and effects pedals are deliberately short–circuited by bending the circuit board to generate spontaneous and unpredictable sounds."

(Duncan Geere, 17 August 2010, Wired UK)

Fig.1 Don Relyea, "glitched out video".

Fig.2 David Szauder, "supra glitch".

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aestheticisationaestheticsanalogue errorsartartefactingartefacts • bug • bugs • circuit bending • corrupting digital code • corrupting digital datacorruptioncraft as conceptdatadata glitchesdatabendingdegradationdesign formalismdigitaldigital culturedigital detritusdigital errorsdigital materialismdistortionerrorexperimentationgenerativeglitchglitch aestheticsglitch artglitch practitionersglitched out videoglitches • glitschig • inducing glitches • malfunction • perfect data • purposeful glitching • randomnessreadymade • short-circuit • supra glitch • tech-arttechniquetechnologyunintentionallyunpredictability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2012

Film Fading to Black: ARRI, Panavision and Aaton have quietly ceased production of film cameras

"While the debate has raged over whether or not film is dead, ARRI, Panavision and Aaton have quietly ceased production of film cameras within the last year to focus exclusively on design and manufacture of digital cameras. ...

'The demand for film cameras on a global basis has all but disappeared,' says ARRI VP of Cameras, Bill Russell, who notes that the company has only built film cameras on demand since 2009. 'There are still some markets––not in the U.S.––where film cameras are still sold, but those numbers are far fewer than they used to be. If you talk to the people in camera rentals, the amount of film camera utilization in the overall schedule is probably between 30 to 40 percent.'

At New York City rental house AbelCine, Director of Business Development/Strategic Relationships Moe Shore says the company rents mostly digital cameras at this point. 'Film isn't dead, but it's becoming less of a choice,' he says. 'It's a number of factors all moving in one direction, an inexorable march of digital progress that may be driven more by cell phones and consumer cameras than the motion picture industry.'

Aaton founder Jean–Pierre Beauviala notes why. 'Almost nobody is buying new film cameras. Why buy a new one when there are so many used cameras around the world?' he says. 'We wouldn't survive in the film industry if we were not designing a digital camera.'

Beauviala believes that that stereoscopic 3D has 'accelerated the demise of film.' He says, 'It's a nightmare to synchronize two film cameras.' Three years ago, Aaton introduced a new 35mm film camera, Penelope, but sold only 50 to 60 of them. As a result, Beauviala turned to creating a digital Penelope, which will be on the market by NAB 2012. 'It's a 4K camera and very, very quiet,' he tells us. 'We tried to give a digital camera the same ease of handling as the film camera.'

Panavision is also hard at work on a new digital camera, says Phil Radin, Executive VP, Worldwide Marketing, who notes that Panavision built its last 35mm Millennium XL camera in the winter of 2009, although the company continues an 'active program of upgrading and retrofitting of our 35mm camera fleet on a ongoing basis.'

'I would have to say that the pulse [of film] was weakened and it's an appropriate time,' Radin remarks. 'We are not making film cameras.' He notes that the creative industry is reveling in the choices available. 'I believe people in the industry love the idea of having all these various formats available to them,' he says. 'We have shows shooting with RED Epics, ARRI Alexas, Panavision Genesis and even the older Sony F–900 cameras. We also have shows shooting 35mm and a combination of 35mm and 65mm. It's a potpourri of imaging tools now available that have never existed before, and an exciting time for cinematographers who like the idea of having a lot of tools at their disposal to create different tools and looks.'"

(Debra Kaufman, 2011, Creative COW)

Fig.1 The Xterà by Aaton (Super16 camera with film magazine).

Fig.2 The Penelope–Delta by Aaton (digital camera with internal full resolution recorder).

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16mm200935mm • 35mm camera • 4K • 4K camera • 65mm • Aaton • AbelCine • ARRIARRI Alexascameracamera-making businesscelluloidcinemacinematographer • consumer cameras • creative industries • demise of film • devicedigitaldigital cameradigital cinematographydigital filmmakingdigital progressDSLR • ease of handling • feature filmfilmfilm camerafilm industryfilm makingfilmmaking • Jean-Pierre Beauviala • motion picture industry • obsolescencePanavision • Panavision Genesis • radical innovationRED Epic • Sony F-900 • stereoscopic • Super16 • technology innovation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2011

Digital Negative: Adobe's publicly available archival photo format

"Raw file formats are becoming extremely popular in digital photography workflows because they offer creative professionals greater creative control. However, cameras can use many different raw formats – the specifications for which are not publicly available – which means that not every raw file can be read by a variety of software applications. As a result, the use of these proprietary raw files as a long–term archival solution carries risk, and sharing these files across complex workflows is even more challenging.

The solution to this growing problem is Digital Negative (DNG), a publicly available archival format for the raw files generated by digital cameras. By addressing the lack of an open standard for the raw files created by individual camera models, DNG helps ensure that photographers will be able to access their files in the future.

Within a year of its introduction, several dozen software manufacturers such as Extensis, Canto, Apple, and iView developed support for DNG. And respected camera manufacturers such as Hasselblad, Leica, Casio, Ricoh, and Samsung have introduced cameras that provide direct DNG support."

(Adobe Systems Incorporated.)

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2004AdobeAdobe PhotoshopAdobe Systems IncApplearchival • archival format • archival solution • archiving • authentic resource • camera manufacturers • Canto • Casio • complex workflows • creative professionalsdigital • digital cameras • digital image preservationdigital negative • Digital Negative (DNG) • digital photographyDNG • Extensis • Hasselblad • intellectual propertyinteroperability • iView • Leica • metadata • open raw image format • open standardpreservationpreserving digital imagesproprietary • proprietary format • RAWraw file • Raw file format • RAW files • raw formats • reverse engineeringRicohroyalty freeSamsung • software applications • solutionspecification • standard format • standardisationtechnologyTIFFusabilityworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 APRIL 2011

The Digital Preservation Coalition: securing the preservation of digital resources in the UK

"The Digital Preservation Coalition was established in 2001 to foster joint action to address the urgent challenges of securing the preservation of digital resources in the UK and to work with others internationally to secure our global digital memory and knowledge base. Established as a not–for–profit membership organisation the coalition provides a mechanism by which members can work together to realise the opportunities of long term access."

(Digital Preservation Coalition)

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2001accessarchivingbrokercultural collecting organisationscultural heritagecultural heritage collectionsdigitaldigital artefactsdigital assetsdigital formatdigital heritage • digital memory • digital preservation • Digital Preservation Coalition • digital resources • DPC • global digital memory • knowledge basemedia artmedia pastnew medianot-for-profitobsolescenceold mediaorganisationpreservation • preservation of digital resources • preserving the pasttechnologyUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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