Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Janet Murray' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 AUGUST 2012

Evocative Research in Art History and Beyond: Imagining Possible Pasts in the Ways to Heaven Project

"This article discusses a particular project that attempted to make art–historical research evocative as well as analytical by employing rich, interactive multi–media. This reliance on evocative material extended techniques practiced by television drama–documentaries and considered their legitimacy and potential within academic art history."

[...what might "evocative research" mean?]

3). Esche–Ramshorn, Christiane and Stanislav Roudavski (2012). "Evocative Research in Art History and Beyond: Imagining Possible Pasts in the Ways to Heaven Project", Digital Creativity, 23, 1, pp. 1–21

1

2

TAGS

15th century • 16th centuryAHRC • Armenia • Armenian history • art history • Christian Orient • Christiane Esche-Ramshorn • Digital Creativity (journal) • Ethiopia • Ethiopian history • European Renaissance • evocative enquiry • evocative researchGeorge Lakoffilluminated manuscriptinteractive multimediainteractive narrativeinteractive storytellinginterpretation • Isaac Newton Trust • Janet Murray • microhistory • multifaceted • new historicism • new mediapractice-based researchrenaissancerepresentationresearch methodologyresearch methods • Stanislav Roudavski • theory building • Ways to Heaven • world history

CONTRIBUTOR

Stanislav Roudavski
30 OCTOBER 2010

Media literacies are neither intuitive nor passive

"Conventions in media serve as a kind of shorthand between creator and audience: In order to understand and enjoy novels, films, theaters, audiences must be able to 'read' the conventions of these media. Though early filmgoers did not understand that the train coming toward them in the Lumiere Brothers' L'Arrivée d'un train à La Ciotat (1895) was merely a projected moving image on a two–dimensional surface, today's cinema audiences are accustomed to the language of film. Media consumers frequently take these conventions for granted, yet, as Sturken and Cartright have pointed out; media literacies are neither intuitive nor passive. Producers invent conventions and visual languages with which viewers must actively engage in order to construct meaning (2001). Audiences must become complicit in these conventions, engaging in what Janet Murray describes as the 'active creation of belief' (1997, 110)."

(Celia Pearce, Georgia Institute of Technology)

Celia Pearce. 'Spatial Literacy: Reading (and Writing) Game Space'

1
2

TAGS

1895 • active creation of belief • another dimensionarriving trainaudienceCelia Pearcecinemacommunication • construct meaning • conventions • conventions in media • Georgia Institute of TechnologyheterotopiaJanet Murray • L Arrivee d un train en gare de La Ciotat • language of film • Lisa Cartwright • Lumiere Brothers • Marita Sturken • mediamedia literaciessilent filmspectacletraintrain arrivaltrain stationvisual communicationvisual depictionvisual languagevisual literacy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 DECEMBER 2009

Gamers and Gorehounds: The Influence of Video Games on the Contemporary Horror Film

"In translating a digital game to the big screen, these titles rely on the integration of aesthetics and narrative from their game counterparts to further enhance the viewing experience. The utilization of game narrative in the horror adaptation film is partially based on the acceptance of the video game medium as a cyberdrama, which emphasizes 'the enactment of the story in the particular fictional space of the computer.'[54] Many popular titles were not only about motor coordination and skill, but about becoming immersed in good storytelling. Author Janet Murray states, 'A story has greater emphasis on plot; a game has greater emphasis on the actions of the player. But where the player is also the protagonist or the god of the story world, then player action and plot event begin to merge.'[55] Murray describes the player's attachment to the game narrative as dramatic agency, which 'requires that we script the interactor as well as the world, so that we know how to engage the world, and so that we build up the appropriate expectations.'[56] "

(Timothy D. Alley, p.47, 2007)

54. Janet Murray, "From Game–Story to Cyberdrama." First Person. Eds. Noah Wardrip– Fruin and Pat Harrigan (Cambridge, MA: The MIT P, 2004) 4.

1

TAGS

aesthetics • Brainscan • consoleconvergenceculture • cyberdrama • David Cronenbergdigital culture • Doom • Duke Nukem 3Ddystopia • eXistenZ (1999) • first-person point of viewfirst-person shooterFPS • Freddys Dead • gamesGrand Theft Autohorrorhorror filmJanet Murray • Lawnmower Man • mediumQuakeremediationrepresentationtechnologytechnophobiaThe Matrix (1999)The Wizard of Ozvideo gamevirtual realityvisual communicationvisual designvisual languageWolfenstein 3Dzombie • zombie invasion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.