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Which clippings match 'Mini-series' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 JULY 2014

The Adventure of English: the evolution of the English language

"The Adventure of English is a British television series (ITV) on the history of the English presented by Melvyn Bragg as well as a companion book, also written by Bragg. The series ran in 2003.

The series and the book are cast as an adventure story, or the biography of English as if it were a living being, covering the history of the language from its modest beginnings around 500 AD as a minor Germanic dialect to its rise as a truly established global language.

In the television series, Bragg explains the origins and spelling of many words based on the times in which they were introduced into the growing language that would eventually become modern English."

[Complete eight part series available on YouTube distributed by Maxwell's collection Pty Limited, Australia]

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TAGS

2002 • A Dictionary of the English Language • American English • American Spelling Book • Anglo-SaxonArabicaristocracyAustraliaAustralian Aborigineauthoritative historyBible • Blue Backed Speller • British televisionCaribbean • Catherine of Aragon • Celtic language • Celts • Church of England • cockney rhyming slang • colonisationcommon languagecommunication • Convicts land • dialectdictionaryDutch • educated people • English languageEsperantoFrenchFrench languageFrisian • Frisian language • Gaelic • Germanic rootsgrammarGreek • Gullah language • Hebrew • Henry V of England • Henry VIII of England • historical eventshistoryhistory of ideas • History of the English language • history of useimmigrationIndiaindustrial revolutioninvasionIsaac NewtonITVJamaicanJane Austen • John Cheke • John WycliffeJonathan Swift • Joseph McCoy • Katherine Duncan-Jones • King James I • languagelanguage developmentLatin wordlinguisticsmedieval churchMelvyn Braggmini-series • modern English • Netherlands • Noah Webster • North America • Old English • peasant • Philip Sidne • pidgin • pronunciation • Queen Elizabeth I • Robert Burns • Rural Rides • Samuel JohnsonSanskritScotland • Scottish language • scripture • spelling • Squanto • television series • The Adventure of English (2002) • theologian • Thomas Sheridan • United Statesuse of wordsvikingvocabulary • Websters Dictionary • West Africa • William Cobbett • William Jones • William Shakespeare • William the Conqueror • William Tyndale • William Wordsworth • words

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2013

The Pillars of the Earth: hand-painted stop motion animation style

"We made this animation in BrosFx Studio. It is an opening to the TV series 'THE PILLARS OF THE EARTH', an adaptation of a book by Ken Follett. The series director is Sergio Mimica Gezzan, who cooperated, among others, with Steven Spielberg. Our goal was to create an animation which would render the colourful and vivid world of medieval England. The next step was to create a distinctive style that the audience would remember. After many tests, we opted for a hand painted stop motion, which suited perfectly the spectacle."

(Michał Socha)

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TAGS

12th century2010 • Acme Filmworks • animation • BrosFX • castleChannel 4colourfuldistinctive visual stylehand-painted stop motion animationhand-painted style • illustration techniques • illustrative style • Ken Follett • medieval • medieval England • Michal Socha • mini-seriesmotion graphics • Muse Entertainment • period drama • Scott Free Production • Sergio Mimica-Gezzan • Steven Spielbergstop motion animationstop-frame animation • Tandem Communications • The Pillars of the Earth • title designtitle sequencetitle sequence designTVTV seriesvisual designvisual stylevivid imagery

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2011

Animated décollage technique used to produce 'Capitu' title sequence

"Capitu is a Brazilian TV mini–series adaptation of 19th–century novelist Machado de Assis' work, Dom Casmurro. The story centres on an ageing man looking back on his life in an attempt to discover whether his best friend is the true father of his son, who he has raised with his wife, Capitu. De Assis' novel is now considered one of Brazil's most important Modernist texts and, in order to convey its radicalism, motion graphics studio Lobo looked to the Dadaist movement as inspiration for the TV show's opening titles and interstitials. The team referenced what several avant–garde artists called 'décollage', a process where–rather than building up an image through layering–cutting and tearing instead reveals layers of buried images."

(Patrick Burgoyne, 28 April 2009)

Fig.1 'Capitu' title sequence.

Fig.2 The making of 'Capitu' title sequence.

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TAGS

19th century2008avant-gardeBrazil • Capitu • Carlos Bela • collagecut-up • cutting and tearing • Dada • decollage • design • Dom Casmurro • Globo Networks • illustrative styleinterstitialsjuxtapositionlayerlayering • Lobo • Machado de Assis • Mateus de Paula Santos • mini-series • Modernist texts • motion graphicspaper • Roger Marmo • title designtitle sequenceTVvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 DECEMBER 2009

The Illusion of Magnitude: Adapting the Epic from Film to Television

"When Giuseppe de Liguoro's Homer's Odyssey (1910) was released in the U.S. in 1912, a review in The Moving Picture World praised it for beginning 'a new epoch in the history of the motion picture as a factor in education' (1). The ambitious claim was made amid the author's desire to see moving pictures adapt Classic sources in such a way to both 'entertain and instruct the average moving picture audience' (2). This aspiration was repeated in the reviews of early U.S. television, which broadcast its own modest 'epics' in the 1950s and '60s in response to the revival of the cinematic epic. Although constrained by limited budgets and an even more limited screen size, television's version of the epic during the 1950s and '60s was applauded for bringing both spectacle and the high–cultural status of Classical works to this often–maligned medium. Focusing on contemporary reviews, this article argues that adaptations of myth were used to promote (and contest) the legitimacy of early television in the United States. (3)"

(Djoymi Baker)

1. W. Stephen Bush, "Homer's Odyssey. Three Reels. (Milano Films.)", The Moving Picture World, Vol. 11, No. 11, 16 March 1912, p. 941.

Fig.1 Francesco Bertolini, Adolfo Padovan and Giuseppe de Liguoro, 1911. 'Homer's Odyssey'

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TAGS

1911 • adaptation • Adolfo Padovan • cinema • classic • Classicalclassicsepicepic spectacularfilmfilm adaptation • Francesco Bertolini • Giuseppe de Liguoro • history • Homer • mediummini-series • Moving Picture World (magazine) • mythologicalmythologyodysseySenses of Cinema (journal)spectaclespectaculartelevisionvisual communicationvisual spectacular epic

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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