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Which clippings match '1907' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 SEPTEMBER 2013

The 1907 Exposition Coloniale de Vincennes

"Souvent oubliée, l'exposition coloniale de 1907 dont l'ambition se limitait aux colonies françaises a été organisé au bois de Vincennes, en lisière de la commune de Nogent–sur–Marne. Le lieu même de cette petite exposition organisée par la Société Française de Colonisation, est resté intact, et l'on peut encore se promener à travers quelques pavillons de 1907, même si certain ont subi les outrages irrémédiables du temps et de la tempête de 1998.

Cinq villages sont reconstitués (Indochine, Madagascar, Congo, Soudan, Tunisie, Maroc) selon les grandes possession de l'empire français. Les indigénes de ces colonies avaient été amené pour parfaire l'animation. Il s'agissait de locaux, à qui on avait proposé un contrat et un salaire pour venir en France habiter ces villages sensés montrer comment l'on vit là–bas. Une fois sur place il est indéniables que ces personnes faisaient le spectacle à l'encontre de ce qu'aujourd'hui on appellerait la dignité humaine. Le visiteur pouvait voir de ses propres yeux, ses indigénes dont on parlait aux actualités cinématographiques. Rites religieux, danses, artisanat, la limite de l'exibition était sans aucun doute dépassée."

(Sylvain Ageorges)

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TAGS

190719th centuryAboriginalalien and strange • bois de Vincennes • Cambodia • Colonial Exhibition (1907) • colonial historycolonial mentalitycolonial powercultural differencecultural hegemonycultural imperialismcultural narrativesculture and customs • degrading • Democratic Republic of Congodignity • ethnographic zoos • ethnological expositions • European imperialism • exotic populations • fictional settingFranceFrench empire • French Indochina • human dignity • human zoos • Jardin dAgronomie Tropicale • Laosliving history museumMadagascar • Morocco • native peoplenatives • negro villages • Nogent-sur-Marne • non-European peoples • patronisingpavilion • primitive state • racismreconstruction • scientific racism • social Darwinism • Societe Francaise de Colonisation • Sudan • Sylvain Ageorges • theme parkTunisia • unilinealism • Vietnam

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2012

Technological advances expand the artist's expressive vocabulary

Exhibition: "Bruno Munari: My Futurist Past", Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, 39A Canonbury Square, London, N1 2AN, From 19 September 2012 to 23 December 2012.

Bruno Munari was a "founding member of the Movimento Arte Concreta (M.A.C.) in Milan, which was established towards the end of the 1940s. This acted as a catalyst for new developments in Italian abstraction, and aspired to bring about a 'synthesis of arts' in which traditional painting would be complemented by new tools of communication, demonstrating the possibility of a convergence of art and technology, creativity and functionality. Reflecting his belief that technological advances expanded the artist's expressive vocabulary, by 1950 Munari had begun to experiment with creating works by means of projecting light through compositions made from a wide range of materials such as coloured and transparent plastic, organic elements and Polaroid filters, producing beautiful and intriguing images of vast dimensions."

(Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, 2012)

Fig.1 Bruno Munari, Aeroplanes and Archers, 1932, mixed media, 34.8 x 24.8cms Courtesy Massimo & Sonia Cirulli Archive

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19071998artart and technologyartistBruno Munaricolour and lightConstructivist-inspiredconvergence • creativity and functionality • exhibitionexpressive vocabularyFuturism (art movement) • Futurist past • hanging mobile • hanging objects • Italian • Italian abstraction • Italian art • Milanmobilesmodernist tradition • Movimento Arte Concreta • new tools of communication • photomontagesculpturespatial environments • synthesis of arts • technological advances • transparent plastic • uncritical attitude towards progress • use of space • useless machinesworking across disciplines • working across media

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 DECEMBER 2009

ontology: singular and multiple forms of art

"Such attention to practice creates considerable pressure to adopt at least a dualist ontology of art, in the sense that our practices appear to embed a distinction between singular and multiple forms of art. Singular artworks are unique, occurring at only one place at a time. Paintings, collages, carved sculptures, and Polaroids are typical examples of singular works. Multiple artworks are those which are capable of having more than one occurrence in different places at the same time. For example, a novel may have many copies, a play many performances, a film many screenings, and a photograph many prints. Each of the occurrences is, in some way, a full–fledged presentation of the work.

This distinction appears to doom the simplest thought, that all works of art are physical particulars. It may be plausible to claim that a painting is a particular material object, or that a jazz performance is a particular physical event, but one cannot identify Alfred Steiglitz's photograph The Steerage with any one of its prints or Peter Schaffer's play Equus with any one of its performances. As Wollheim (1980) first pointed out, the occurrences are potentially many, and one thing cannot be identical to many distinct things. So too, such works survive the destruction or passing of their occurrences, even such epistemologically privileged occurrences as manuscripts and holographs. They must be some other sort of thing."

(Paul Redding)

Fig.1 Stieglitz, Alfred. The Steerage, 1907

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TAGS

1907Alfred Stieglitzartartworkcarved sculpturecarvingcollagecreative practicecritical theorydualism • Equus • essential uniquenessholographimmigrantjazz performance • Jewish photographer • manuscriptmaterial objectmateriality • multiple • multiple artworks • multiple forms of art • occurrence • ontologypaintingperformance • Peter Schaffer • photograph • photographic prints • physical eventPolaroid • prints • simultaneity • singular • singular artworks • singular forms of art • singular works • uniquework of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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