Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Differance' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 DECEMBER 2013

Visceral Theory: Affect and Embodiment

"How can we think or write theory in the wake of poststructuralism? For a number of recent thinkers, one possible answer arrives in the often slippery category of affect, in the attempt to return theoretical attention not only to material conditions but specifically to the body and the intensities that traverse it. Such theorists are critical of the elevation of language over visceral, lived experience and interested in the ways that affects circulate publicly or are transmitted contagiously. 'The skin,' writes Brian Massumi, 'is faster than the word.' In different ways, they theorize affect–which they distinguish from emotion or feeling–as a per–personal and pre–linguistic entity about which they nonetheless attempt to speak. This class will constitute a joint experiment in how to think, write, and deploy the concept or concepts of affect. Readings will include selections from Baruch Spinoza, Sigmund Freud, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Brian Massumi, Kathleen Stewart, Teresa Brennan, Lauren Berlant, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and others. No prior reading will be assumed, but a willingness to struggle with and through nonlinear and experimental writing (both alone and with the group) will be an absolute necessity."

(Abby Kluchin)

1

TAGS

Abby Kluchin • affect • affect theoryBaruch Spinozabody • Brian Massumi • differanceembodimentemotion • Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick • feelingFelix GuattariGilles Deleuzeintensities • Kathleen Stewart • Lauren Berlant • material conditions • per-personal entity • poststructuralism • pre-linguistic entity • Sigmund Freudskin • slippery category • Teresa Brennan • theorise affect • visceralvisceral experiencevisceral theory

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
21 JULY 2012

Roland Barthes: Readerly and Writerly Texts

"The writerly text is a perpetual present, upon which no consequent language (which would inevitably make it past) can be superimposed; the writerly text is ourselves writing, before the infinite play of the world (the world as function) is traversed, intersected, stopped, plasticized by some singular system (Ideology, Genus, Criticism) which reduces the plurality of entrances, the opening of networks, the infinity of languages."

(Roland Barthes, p.5)

1). Roland Barthes (1970). "S/Z" translated by Richard Miller, Blackwell Publishing.
2). A British one penny coin from 1903, which has been defaced by Suffragettes. Crown copyright.

1

TAGS

1970 • codes of meaning • Comedie Humaine • criticismdifferancegenusHonore de Balzacideology • infinity of languages • languagelisable • lisible • literary criticismnarratology • opening of networks • ourselves writing • plasticised • plural • plurality • plurality of entrances • polysemouspolysemypost-structuralismreaderly textsRoland Barthes • S/Z • Sarrasine • scriptiblestructuralism • structuralist analysis • text • text of the story • the pastwriterly texts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 MAY 2005

Differance: the formation of form

"The word 'differance', spelled with an 'a', is a coined term, and Derrida contrasts it with the vernacular term 'difference'. Patterns of 'Difference,' he explains, [are ] ...'produced' – deferred –– by 'differance' (Derrida, 1982, p.14). But what does this mean? That difference is deferred by differance? Imagine observing a quilt on the wall with patches of yellow, blue and white. If you notice the yellow and the non–yellow, you see a pattern of concentric boxes. If you notice the blue and the non–blue you see a chequered design. Each pattern is a play of differences, but it is a different set of differences when yellow is differentiated from non–yellow than when blue is differentiated from non–blue, a different set of differences that shows us different patterns. What is interesting about this shift from one pattern to the other is that it not only calls our attention to a new pattern, but that it suppresses our awareness of the other pattern. DifferAnce, defers a pattern of differences (say the pattern of differences between the blue and the not–blue). That is, one pattern of differences pushes into the background another possible play of patterns. You cannot study the pattern of yellows and the pattern of blues at the same time because differance causes one or the other patterns to be 'deferred'. DifferAnce is the hidden way of seeing things that is deferred out of awareness by our distraction with the imagery that captures our attention. Because it contains this other way to see things 'DifferAnce is the...formation of form.'(Derrida, 1976, p.63)."

(Lois Shawver)

Derrida, Jacques. 1982 Differance. In Jacques Derrida (Ed.), Margins of Philosophy, Chicago, USA: The University of Chicago Press.Derrida, Jacques. 1976 Grammatology, Baltimore, USA: The Johns Hopkins.

1

TAGS

defer • deferment • degrees of interrelationdifferanceformation of formJacques Derrida • Lois Shawver • neographism • pattern • patterns of difference • polysemouspolysemyquiltvernacular
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.