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Which clippings match 'Rene Magritte' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 MARCH 2015

Richard Hamilton: British Pop Art Pioneer

"Hamilton was a member of the Independent Group, formed in the 1950s by a group of artists and writers at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, whose symposiums contributed to the development of Pop art in Britain. He was one of the prime practitioners of the critic Lawrence Alloway's theory of a 'fine/pop art continuum'. Hamilton interpreted this as meaning that 'all art is equal - there was no hierarchy of value. Elvis was to one side of a long line while Picasso was strung out on the other side ... TV is neither less nor more legitimate an influence than, for example, is New York Abstract Expressionism' (Hamilton, p.31)."

(Terry Riggs, December 1997, Tate)

Richard Hamilton (1956). 'Just what is it that makes today's homes so different, so appealing?'

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TAGS

1950s19561960sAllen JonesAndy Warhol • Antony Donaldson • Brigitte Bardot • British artist • Clive Barker • Colin Self • collagecollage artDamien HirstDavid Hockney • Derek Boshier • Eduardo Paolozzi • effervescent • ephemera of popular culture • Frank Auerback • Galina Golikova • gaudy • Gerald Laing • influential creators • international art movement • James Rosenquist • Jan Howarth • Jann Haworth • Joe Tilson • Ken Russell • Lawrence Alloway • Leon Kossoff • low cost • Marcel Duchampmass audience • mass produced • Nicholas Monro • Patrick Caulfield • Pauline Boty • Peter Blake • Peter Philips • Peter Phillipspop art • pop art movement • popular art • popular culture • proto-pop art • rebellious art • Rene MagritteRichard Hamilton • Richard Smith • Robert Indiana • Ronald Brooks Kitaj • Roy Lichtenstein • short term solution • silkscreen • transient

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 DECEMBER 2009

Ceci n'est pas une pipe: undercutting our expectation about representation

"Doesn't a picture that declares, 'This is not a pipe,' undercut our expectation that representation will give us the thing – in this case, the pipe – itself? The difficulty it presents is no accident. Magritte was perhaps unique among the visual artists of this century in the depth of his philosophical lore. Another of his pipe dreams contains a depiction of a pipe on a blackboard under which 'This is not a pipe' is inscribed in a schoolmasterly hand. Floating above the blackboard Magritte depicts a kind of Platonic pipe. By virtue of its disproportionate size and free–floating dislocation, this utopian pipe is made to seem a mirage, while the depiction of a pipe, comfortably ensconced in its frame, enjoys a higher ontological dignity. The superficial contrast between the flat, two–dimensional blackboard pipe and the Platonic or transcendental overpipe is subverted, and it dawns on us that it is the picture of the pipe that we know, not the pipe in itself."

(Flint Schier, 23 January 1983, The New York Times)

Fig.1 La Trahison des images (Ceci n'est pas une pipe), 1929; Fig.2 René Magritte – Die zwei Mysterien, 1966, "Die Pfeife ist keine Pfeife", (Ceci n'est pas une Pipe)

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TAGS

19291983artartistBelgian • ceci nest pas une pipe • idealismmeta-paintingMichel FoucaultmimesispipePlatoRene Magritterepresentationrepresentational strategiessignificationsignifiedsignifier • this is not a pipe • truthvisual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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