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Which clippings match 'Geometric Primitive' keyword pg.1 of 2
04 NOVEMBER 2015

Light projection works by American artist James Turrell

"For over half a century, the American artist James Turrell has worked directly with light and space to create artworks that engage viewers with the limits and wonder of human perception. ...

Turrell often cites the Parable of Plato's Cave to introduce the notion that we are living in a reality of our own creation, subject to our human sensory limitations as well as contextual and cultural norms. This is evident in Turrell's over eighty Skyspaces, chambers with an aperture in the ceiling open to the sky. The simple act of witnessing the sky from within a Turrell Skyspace, notably at dawn and dusk, reveals how we internally create the colors we see and thus, our perceived reality. ...

Turrell's medium is pure light. He says, 'My work has no object, no image and no focus. With no object, no image and no focus, what are you looking at? You are looking at you looking. What is important to me is to create an experience of wordless thought.'"

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aesthetic experienceallegory of the cavechamber • childhood fascination • colour and lightcolour fieldcolour light • colour projection • design formalismflat colourformalist design aestheticsgeometric primitive • high-intensity projector • human sensory limitations • immaterialityimmersive experienceimmersive works • interior and exterior spaces • James Turrelllarge scale worklightlight and spacelight artlight projectionlight works • no focus • no image • no object • non-representationalNorth American artistop art • open sky spaces • perceptual psychology • physical presence of lightpresence • projection pieces • projection works • pure light • sensory form • sky • skyspaces • visual abstraction • wordless thought

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 SEPTEMBER 2014

Christian Leborg: Visual Grammar

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abstract conceptsabstract objectsabstractionChristian Leborg • communicate visually • communication design systemscommunication design theory • complexity of dimensions • coordinate systemdesign formalism • design fundamentals • design principles • empty space • formatgeometric primitivegraphic design • ideal shape • language of design • lineline in spacelinesmodernist design principlespictorial systemsplanepoint • simple planes • surfacethree dimensional objects • transcendent line • typographyvisual design • visual design primer • visual fundamentals • visual grammar • volume • volumeswordless

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 SEPTEMBER 2014

About Two squares: In 6 constructions: A Suprematist Tale (Suprematicheskii Skaz Pro Dva Kvadrata v Shesti Postroikakh)

"This short book, intended for children of all ages, is perhaps the best–known work of El Lissitzky (1890–1941). Lissitzky was a Russian artist, architect, designer, typographer, and photographer who was active in the avante garde movement that flourished in Soviet Russia and in Germany, until the dominance of Soviet Realism by 1930 put a stop to its revolutionary activity. He directly influenced the typographical and display advertising innovations of the Bauhaus and 'de Stijl'. This book entirely integrates modern typographical effects, as Lissitzky intended, with his illustrations in the Suprematist style.

The original book About Two Squares was printed by letterpress, even the slanted text and illustrations. It was first produced ('constructed') in 1920 at the Soviet art institute UNOVIS in Vitebsk, and around April 1922 printed by Sycthian Press, Berlin, by Haberland Printers, Leipzig, in paperback, with 50 hardbound copies autographed and numbered, as the copyright page states."

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1922 • About 2 Squares (El Lissitzky) • allegory • art books • artistartists booksavant-garde artists • avant-garde movement • black square • Bolshevism • childrens bookDe Stijldesign formalismEl LissitzkyFuturismgeometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric primitivegraphic designgraphic design historyibiblioJew • Lazar Markovich Lissitzky • letterpress printinglithographymanifestomodernist aesthetics • modernist utopian vision • non-objective art • offset litho • offset printingpaperback • periodical design • picture bookprintingprintmaking • propagandist works • red circle • red square • Russian constructivism • Russian nationalism • sans-serif typeface • Soviet propaganda • Soviet Russiasquare • story of revolution • Suprematism • suprematism movement • suprematist aesthetics • typographical effects • typography • UNOVIS (Affirmers of the New Art) • utilitarianvisual abstraction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 FEBRUARY 2014

Pierre Hébert: Around Perception (1968)

"Around Perception is a groundbreaking experiment on computer–based animation, consisting of 11 audiovisual events designed to baffle cognition and unrest comfortable notions of reality. Unlike most of his later films, Hébert chose not to collaborate with top–notch experimental musicians and created the soundtrack himself. In this, he followed a method also used by Norman McLaren: to scratch sound directly onto the film itself. The relation between sound and picture, however, is not as symbiotic as in McLaren's Synchromy: although there are organic reactions between the two domains, one is not a direct translation of the other. This, of course, need not be seen as a weakness. Indeed, with its fast–paced changes of color and geometrical patterns, and the employment of Columbia–like richly crafted electronic tones, Around Perception works as a tremendously hallucinatory exercise in trompe l'oeil (and l'oreille) techniques. Or, as stated by Hébert himself at the beginning of the film, an exercise 'for the mind and against the mind'."

(The Sound of Eye)

Fig.1 "Around Perception", Director: Pierre Hébert, Year: 1968, Time: 16 mins, Music: Pierre Hébert.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Kazimir Malevich: non-representational, non-painterly abstractions

"In the early twentieth century, Suprematism represented a leap into a totally non–representational, non–painterly, tarantella–like dynamic. Basic geometric shapes, isolated or in groups, were being energized, propelled into an optimistic ideal soaring from lower left to upper right, the vector alone suggesting time. The limits of perception and understanding are being questioned. An aura of simultaneous ecstatic concentration and idolatry of the will pervades these works.

Experienced 'in flesh,' these formidable abstractions look 'humanized': slight wavings in texture and color, the crackled paint of the Black Square on white, the subtlest of whites upon off–whites, transport the viewer into a higher, supremely charged, inspirational state of mind."

(Ileana Marcoulesco, Art Lies)

Fig.1 Kazimir Malevich (1915) "Black Circle", "Black Cross" and "Black Square"

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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