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Which clippings match 'Diaspora' keyword pg.1 of 2
17 JANUARY 2014

Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture

"Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture (WPCC) is a peer–reviewed journal, published four times a year in hard copy and online.

WPCC recognises the interdisciplinary nature of the field of Media and Cultural Studies, and therefore deliberately encourages diverse methods, contexts and themes.

Particular interests include, but are not limited to, work related to Popular Culture, Media Audiences, Political Economy, Promotional Culture, New Media, Political communication, Migration and Diasporic Studies.

A major goal of the WPCC is to help develop a de–westernised and transcultural sphere that engages both young and established scholars from different parts of the world in a critical debate about the relationship between communication, culture and society in the 21st Century."

(Anthony McNicholas)

TAGS

21st century • Andrea Medrado • Anthony McNicholas • Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI) • critical debate • critical discoursecultural studiesculture and society • de-westernised • diaspora • diasporic studies • ethnographic researchinterdisciplinary thinking • media and cultural studies • media audiences • media communication • media studies • migration studies • new mediapeer-reviewed journal • political communication • political economypopular culture • promotional culture • transculturalUniversity of Westminster • Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture (WPCC) • WPCC

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2010

The Austronesian speaking people have voyaged for centuries making a network of communication

"Across the Pacific and Indian oceans, the Austronesian speaking people have voyaged for centuries making a network of communication within this linguistic family to be the most extensive in the world prior to the European colonial days. Launched from the Western Pacific, in the neighborhood of the South China Sea (yet undetermined), the early Austronesian speakers reached islands of further distance apart traveling in canoes lashed and pegged together to Micronesia, the Lesser Sunda, and the Society Islands to Easter Island and Hawaii. In the westerly direction, voyagers made it to Madagascar. It set the stage for pan– Pacific/Indian Ocean long distance navigation (Sneider and Kyselka 1986).

As this tracing of oceans happened from 5500 years ago to the ethnographic present, the network process of these cultures is now only becoming to be understood as vast sophisticated complex (Bellwood 1998). For Westerners, this was observed by Captain Cook, a British explorer of the oceans and terra incognito in the 1700s his discovered that Austronesian speakers had advance information on his visits before his arrival to islands across the Pacific.

The earliest evidence of the Austronesian linguistic family points to Taiwan (yet unconfirmed as such), and the surrounding islands. Presently there are just under a dozen distinct groups in this family inhabiting the plain such as the Kavalan and Amis, the mountain areas, and the offshore isle of Lanyu where the Daowu (or Yami) live. These people have different cultures proving them with specialized means of co–existing with the natural environment."

(David Blundell, Jieh Hsiang)

[D. Blundell & J. Hsiang, 'Taiwan Austronesian Electronic Cultural Atlas of the Pacific' Proceedings of the 1999 EBTI, ECAI, SEER and PNC Joint Meeting, pp.525–540, January 1999.]

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TAGS

1999Aborigine • Amis • Austronesian cultures • Austronesian speakers • Captain Cookcultures • Daowu • diaspora • Easter Island • ethnographic • Fiji • Formosan languages • Hawaiiidentity • Indian oceans • Indigenous • Kavalan • Lanyu • Lapita peoplelinguisticsMadagascar • Malayo-Polynesian languages • Micronesia • migrationnatural environmentOceaniaPacific Rim • pan-Indian Ocean • pan-Pacific Ocean • settlementSociety Islands • South China Sea • Sunda • TaiwanTaiwanese Aborigines • Western Pacific • Yami

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 DECEMBER 2009

Museums as civic laboratories

Tony "Bennett has long considered the relationship between museums and civic society, adopting a structure/agency approach to museums as spaces which both reflect the concerns of the nation state and might be spaces where cultural identity is shifted and developed. His work has focused on ways in which current concerns to refashion museums so that they might function as instruments for the promotion of cultural diversity do, or do not succeed, in practice (Bennett 1995, 2004, 2005). Bennett draws on the work of Bruno Latour in trying to re conceptualise the relationship between objects, practices and places, and focused on the idea of the experimental arrangements of objects in a laboratory as a way of considering the space of the museum. Because museums take objects out of their context, and as it were, recontextualise them, severing the objects from the social context, processes and practices that produce them, a construction of a new kind of cultural politics around identity and artefacts becomes possible."

(Kate Pahl , 7 September 2006)

'Narratives of migration and artefacts of identity: new imaginings and new generations' given at the 'Digital Literacies, Identity Performances and Learning' BERA Conference, Warwick

TAGS

agencyBruno Latourchangecivic engagement • civic laboratories • civic society • communitycontextcultural codes • cultural politics • democratic participationdiasporaidentityideology of the gallery spacemigrationmuseumobjectporous spaces • re contextualisation • representationsocial constructionismsocietytraditiontransformation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2008

60x60 Secs: 60 one-minute films from 60 artists, 20 each from Britain, India and Pakistan

"60x60 Secs is the first project of the 360 ° programme, and comprises of 60 one–minute films from 60 artists, 20 each from Britain, India and Pakistan.

Commissioned via open call both established and emerging artists, working in a variety of mediums and spanning a wide age range, present their unique views on 'home'. Looking beyond media, political and religious definitions, 60x60 Secs unravels complex identities and stories, and redefines cultures that are evolving in an age of globalisation."
(Motiroti arts organisation, UK)

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TAGS

360 degrees • 60x60 Secs • arts organisationBritaincinemaculturediasporadigital mediaglobalisationhomeidentityIndiamicro short film • motiroti • narrativePakistanperforming artspoliticsreligionshort filmSouth AsiaUKvideo

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2008

Maori art education: hybrid or essentialist praxis?

"While this amalgam of identities may be construed as a hybrid persona, my practice both as artist and educator cannot be construed in this manner since a hybrid identity propounds an anti–essentialist critique of aesthetics and cultural identity. While it has been argued that hybridity as a subject position is more in keeping with the shifting realities of identity construction and border crossings of the trans–global present I find its indeterminate nature and its recourse to 'mimicry' problematic. Homi Bhabha has re–conceptualised hybridity as the 'Third Space', a space in between subject positions that is "an ambivalent site where cultural meaning and representation have no 'primordial unity or fixity'". It should come as no surprise that the ambivalent and tenuous nature of the Third Space has a post–structuralist essence in which '[t]he "nomadism" of "unhomeliness" [has become] a new norm which [has] displaced the sovereignty of national cultures and a universal human culture'. While there are problems with hybridity it seems plausible as an ideological position particularly for diasporic populations who must necessarily articulate their identities within another space that is not their own. "
(Robert Jahnke, Victoria University of Wellington, NZ)

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TAGS

ambivalent site • Aotearoa New Zealand • Bhabha • culturediasporahybridityidentity • Janke • Korotangi Series 5 • Maori • Ornsby • post-structuralismpraxissovereigntythird spacetransglobal

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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