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Which clippings match 'Hair' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 MARCH 2014

Blowing in the Wind: metro station screen reacts to train arrival

"On behalf of Åkestam Holst and Apotek Hjärtat we modified one of Clear Channel's Play screens on Odenplans subway platform. The mission was to capture the effect of the turbulence from the train and make it look like the models hair on the screen was caught by the breeze.

To do this we needed to build a device that could be calibrated to sense the arrival of the train and not react to passing passengers. Using an ultra sonic sensor, connected to a Raspberry Pi and a local network socket, we connected our device to the screens computer where the film could be activated by the passing trains.

Stopp managed the shooting and post production of all video material used for the customized screen at Odenplan and all other Play screens around the subway.

A simple idea, well executed, that let us use existing technology in a new way. The installation was appreciated by the head of Clear Channel and as a result Apotek Hjärtat was offered to keep it live for five additional days, as a way for them to show the opportunities their screens can offer."

(STOPP/STHLM)

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TAGS

2014adadvertising in public spacesadvertising screens • Akestam Holst • apolosophy • Apotek • Apotek Hjartat • arriving train • breeze • caught by the breeze • Clear Channel • Clear Channel Play • digital billboardsdigital screenshair • hair product • hair tousled by the wind • interactive animations • interactive subway ad • local network socket • metro station • moving train • Odenplan • Odenplan metro station • passing trains • pharmacyrail advertisingrailway advertisingrailway stationRaspberry PiStockholm • STOPP (integrated production company) • subwaySwedentrain arrivaltrain stationturbulence • ultra sonic sensor • ultrasonic sensor

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JULY 2013

Futuristic fashions: Eve, A.D. 2000!

"Futuristic fashions 1939 style include a dress that can be adapted for day or evening wear, complete with sun–visor (and African–American maid), and a dress made of transparent net with a towering 60s–style hairdo (wouldn't look out of place on a millennium catwalk). The next two outfits are pretty transparent too; then a bridal gown with a cellophane veil and another adaptable dress.

The suit for the man of 2000 looks like a boiler suit with wide chain mail over the top. A circular aerial is worn on the head, to pick up signals for his mobile phone and radio. He also has two natty silver boxes attached to his belt 'for coins, keys and candy for cuties'. The beard is marcel–waved and he has buns of hair at the side of his head. Not a particularly manly look!"

(British Pathé)

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1930s19392000 • 2000 AD • adaptable dress • aerial • African-American • beard • boiler suit • bridal gownBritish Pathe • candy for cuties • catwalkcellophane • chain mail • clothing • day wear • dress • Eve • evening wear • fashion designfashion forecastingfuture forecastingfuturistic design • futuristic fashions • futuristic visionhair • hairdo • maid • manly look • millenniummobile phone • natty • newsreel • outfit • Pathetone Weekly • portable radio • predictionretrofuturismstylesuit • sun visor • transparencyveilwomens clothingwomenswear

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MARCH 2012

Shadow puppetry matches dreamlike quality of Kate Bush song

"50 Word's for Snow found the elusive Kate Bush at her most stark and stripped–down. The album was the aural equivalent of a single line of footsteps in a snowy pasture. It's no wonder then that Bush, who has always been skilled at pairing her music with their equivalent visuals, turned away from her trademark cinematics for the video of her song, 'Lake Tahoe.'

In the album version of 'Lake Tahoe,' only quiet strings and a piano accompany Bush as she weaves a tale of an old dog dreaming of his owner. And while the full song explains the animal's true situation, Bush – who directed the video herself – has trimmed it down into a more ambiguous excerpt here.

Her use of shadow puppetry matches song's dreamlike quality. The stark contrast between the black figures and the white world makes each set piece seem mystical. The dog runs through phantasmagorical lands filled with spooky woods, looking for his owner. It's beautiful in its simplicity – emphasizing small subtle movements over big extravagance. The elegant design of the puppets mixes fantasy elements like the moving trees with realistic pieces such as the soft sway of the woman's hair."

(Dan Raby, 24 January 2012, All Songs Considered Blog, National Public Radio)

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2012 • 50 • 50 Words for Snow • aestheticsblack and whitedesigndioramadogdreamlike quality • Eider Falls at Lake Tahoe • elegant designfantasyfantasy elements • graphic • hair • Kate Bush • Lake Tahoe • monochromatic • moving trees • music video • National Public Radio • NPRphantasmagoriaphantasmagoricalpuppetpuppetry • Robert Allsopp • shadowshadow puppetshallow focussimplicityspooky woodsstripped-down • subtle movements • tale • visual designvisual spectaclevisual storyvisual style

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2009

Kitchen Sink: suburban domestic horror short film

"Disturbing horror film. A woman is cleaning her kitchen sink. Just when she thinks it is spotless, she notices what appears to be a strand of hair near the drain. As she pulls on it, she realizes it is coming out of the drain…and is very long. Nominated for Golden Palm. Written & Directed by Alison Maclean / New Zeland / 1989 Produced by Bridget Ikin Starring: Theresa Healey, Peter Tait & Annagretta Christian"

(a Chick, flicksbychicks.com)

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198935mm • Alison Maclean • Annagretta Christian • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralasiabody hair • Bridget Ikin • Canadachild birthcinemaclaustrophobiacleanlinessdomestic • domestic horror • fear of the abjectgendergender roleshairhorrorhorror film • Kitchen Sink (1989) • kiwi short filmslanugo • maternity • mothermotherhoodNew Zealand cinemaNZ Film Archive • Peter Tait • psychological framingpsychological horrorshort film • sink • suburbanThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Film • Theresa Healey

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 NOVEMBER 2009

Big Hair: A Wig History of Consumption in Eighteenth-Century France

"Historians of consumption have generally followed social theorists in emphasizing two different aspects of modernity. While social scientists emphasize long term processes of 'modernization,' such as urbanization and industrialization, cultural historians and literary critics define modernity in terms of consciousness, stressing in particular the development of a reflexive self and a heightened awareness of one's present age as new and set off from the past.(4) Both understandings of modernity underpin current historical literature on eighteenth–century Western European consumption. Highlighting socioeconomic processes of commercialization, historians argue that eighteenth–century Western Europe experienced a 'consumer revolution' as men and women freed themselves from the grip of scarcity to initiate a buying spree of historic proportions. Although its geography and periodization remain highly controversial, such a revolution is commonly represented as a step toward modern consumer society.(5) At the same time, the study of consumption, especially French consumption, has taken a cultural turn, opening new doors between the Enlightenment and late modernity. (6) Daniel Roche, whose work has defined the field, argues that the birth of consumption was an integral part of a larger cultural change in which the traditional values of a stationary Christian economy gradually gave way to the egalitarianism and individualism of modern commodity culture. For Roche, the story is principally one of emancipation: 'It is important to recognize that . . . commodities did not necessarily foster alienation; in fact, they generally meant liberation.'(7) The diffusion of fashion led to 'a new state of mind, more individualistic, more hedonistic, in any case more egalitarian and more free.'(8) Less optimistic than Roche but equally intent on establishing a connection between Enlightenment consumption and modernity, Jennifer Jones contends that the late–eighteenth–century discourse on fashion helped to produce modern, essentialized definitions of gender. As social differentiation faded from fashion commentary, gender differentiation took its place.(9)"

(Michael Kwass, p.633, The American Historical Review, 111.3)

Fig.1 FRONTISPIECE: Wigs. Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonnée des sciences, des arts et des métiers. Recueil de planches, sur les sciences, les arts libéraux, et les arts méchaniques, avec leur explication, 11 vols. (Paris, 1762–1772), s.v. "Perruquier."

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changecollaborationcommercialisationconsciousness • consumer revolution • consumer society • consumerismconsumptioncostume design • cultural historian • Daniel Roche • egalitarianism • emancipationEuropean EnlightenmentfashionFrancegender differentiationgeographyhairhedonismhistoryindividualismindustrialisation • Jennifer Jones • late modernityliterary criticmodernisationmodernityperiodisation • reflexive self • social change • social constructionist • social differentiationsocietysocio-economictraditiontransformationurbanisation • Western Europe • wig

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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