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Which clippings match 'Interzone' keyword pg.1 of 1
12 DECEMBER 2014

Sex Criminals: high-concept comic book about time freezing deviance

"Suzie's a normal girl with an extraordinary ability: when she has sex, she stops time. One night she meets Jon... who has the same gift. And so they do what any other sex–having, time–stopping, couple would do: they rob banks."

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2013alternative cartoons • alternative culture • arresting time • bank robbing • Chip Zdarsky • comedy seriescomic bookcomicscriminal actsdeviancedeviant desiresformal conceit • freeze time • frozen in the momentfrozen in timefrozen momentgraphic novelhigh concept • Image Comics • in media resindividual gaininterzoneliminality • Matt Fraction • mature readers • moment of climaxopportunityorgasmpetite mort • robbing banks • rule of law • sex comedy • Sex Criminals (comic book) • slice of frozen timespeculative fictionthefttime

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 DECEMBER 2009

Alphaville exists. Everywhere!

"Science–fiction films tell us as much about the time in which they were made as the future they project and between the two moments–the one specific, the other nominal (1984, 2001, etc)–a sense develops of their qualities of prescience and allegorical vision. The enterprise of proposing a world–to–be is always a hostage to the future's fortune. The law of diminishing returns that applies as regards special effects bears this out. How soon before Matrix–era 'bullet time' looks as dated as Douglas Trumbull's 'star gate' pyrotechnics in 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)? Which may explain why Alphaville hasn't aged as badly as other examples of the genre; it finds its 'special effect' in the specifically cinematic resource of light.

But this light, let's remind ourselves, is the light of the past brought to bear on the presence of the future now. Would it be going too far to suggest that, in adding the dimensions of past and future to the present of 1965, Godard was able to set the controls of his particular time machine to withstand the very test of time? There's no shortage of films that seek to travel in time following Alphaville, from Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982) and Mauvais sang (Leos Carax, 1986) to Gattaca (Andrew Niccol, 1997) and Dark City (Alex Proyas, 1998). There is also the developing genre of what critic Jonathan Romney has named 'steel and glass cinema' which he describes 'as cinema set in the recognisably contemporary urban world but framed and shot in such a way that it becomes detached, not unreal so much as irreal, bordering on science fiction', examples of which include Elle est des nôtres (She's a Jolly Good Fellow, Seigrid Alnoy, 2002), Demonlover (Olivier Assayas, 2002), Cypher (Vincenzo Natali, 2002) and Code 46 (Michael Winterbottom, 2003). Romney claims Alphaville to be 'the mother' of such cinema and with good reason. In the forty or so years separating Alphaville from Demonlover it has become evident that the no–place of Godard's dystopia, with its labyrinth of corridors and lobbies, was already one big non–place in waiting. The presence of the future that Godard was keen to capture back in 1965 has since taken shape as a global nonplace crossing continents and time–zones. 'It may be that we have already dreamed our dream of the future', J.G. Ballard has mused, 'and have woken with a start into a world of motorways, shopping malls and airport concourses which lie around us like a first instalment of a future that has forgotten to materialize.' Or, to put it another way, Alphaville exists. Everywhere."

(Chris Darke, Vertigo Magazine)

This is an edited extract from Chris Darke's monograph on J–L Godard's Alphaville to be published by I.B.Tauris in 2005. Chris Darke is a writer, critic and lecturer on the moving image. His book of selected writings, Light Readings, is published by Wallflower Press. He is also represented, with his film study Chris on Chris, on the DVD of La Jetée and Sans Soleil. See also pages 26 and 38.

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19651982198619971998 • 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) • 200220032005airportAlphavillebetweenBrazilbullet timecritiqueculture • Dark City (1998) • Demonlover • dystopiaenvironmentfutureGattacainterzone • irreal • J G BallardJean-Luc Godard • labyrinth • lightmall • Mauvais Sang • non-placeRidley ScottSao Paolosci-fiscience-fictionsocial interactionsocietyspaceStanley Kubrick • Stargate • steel and glass cinema • The Matrix (1999)traditionurban

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JANUARY 2006

A-Ha Take On Me: boundary-crossing to another dimension

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1980s19852D representations • A-Ha • Alan Tarney • Altered States (1980) • another dimensionboundary-crossingbreaking the fourth wall • Bunty Bailey • comic bookcomic book styleglass portalhand-drawn animation • Hunting High and Low (1985) • interzone • Kims Cafe • living pictures • Morten Harket • motorcycle • motorcycle sidecar • MTVMTV Video Music Awardsmusic videoNorwegianOrphee (1950) • pencil drawn • pencil-sketch animation • Philip Jackson • pipe wrench • pop musicportal • racing • romantic fantasy • rotoscope animationrotoscopingstepping out of the frame • Steve Barron • synthpop • Take on Me (song) • two-dimensional barriervisual spectaclewaitressWarner Music Group
07 MARCH 2005

391-36: Singaporeasy

"Singaporeasy is a hypertext story based on an experience of a stopover in a strange city. It is a cross between a travel guide and a jumble of trivial memories and fleeting ideas. It contains narratives, which overlap and inform one another but never conclude. It invites the reader to click on the links, to choose their own path, to wander."
(Liz Swift)

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hypernarrativehypertext • hypertext narrative • hypertext story • interzone • Liz Swift • memorynarrativenet.artSingapore • singaporeasy • stop over • storytravel
24 FEBRUARY 2004

A disturbing little film called A Little Death

"It's a long time since I've seen a film as genuinely disturbing as A Little Death. The title refers to the phrase 'un petite mort'. French slang for orgasm. This surreal film explores all the ambiguity of that phrase to devastating effect. A couple are making love. Or rather having sex – the hostility between them is palpable. The moment of climax flings them both into another dimension where the emotional savagery of their relationship is played out for real. Luscious colour photography gives way to crisp black and white, as Davison crashes through their bed into an identical room where everything, including her lover, is literally two–dimensional, bleached of life but tilled with an almost impersonal hatred. The tension that previously simmered beneath the surface is unleashed in images of extraordinary violence. Brophy, trapped in the 'wallpaper' of this unnatural room, can only scream as she takes her revenge. This ambitious script is well supported by its technically immaculate execution. It is tightly constructed, beautifully edited and the superb soundtrack is unusually effective, an integral part of the film rattler than (as too often happens) an afterthought. Much of the power of the film has to do with its purely visual logic, it didn't start to make sense to me until I stopped trying to figure out what was going on and just let the images wash over me. This is one of those rare films that can stand repeated viewings (providing you can) and serious philosophical debate, despite the fact its violent take on gender relations is more than a little disturbing. A Little Death is an uncommonly brave and passionate piece of filmmaking that stays in the mind long after it's been seen."

(Pavement magazine, 1995)

Fig.1 Simon Perkins and Paul Swadel (1994). "A Little Death", James Wallace Productions: 16mm, 11 minutes. [A Little Death externalises conflict between characters through the use of physical obstacles and camera perspectives. The film is an evolution of the "Into The Void" project.]
Fig.2 Natalie Robertson (1994). Josephine Davison is confused to find herself on a photocopied floor.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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