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Which clippings match 'Animated Film' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 JANUARY 2016

Why Man Creates: the great (Western) progress narrative

"How unlikely that one of the least definable films from the last half-century would also be one of the most beloved. A favorite of classroom AV diversions, and an abridged presentation on the very first episode of '60 Minutes' helped make it the most viewed educational film of all time. 'I don't know what it all means,' Saul Bass himself admitted, and his 'Why Man Creates' (1968) is far more loose and playful than the rigid thesis its title might imply. In fact, it is the searching and open-ended nature of the various vignettes that perhaps makes the film resonate so strongly with viewers. Though an Oscar®-winner for Documentary Short Subject, the film is almost entirely invented, apart from recollections of old masters like Edison, Hemingway and Einstein, and brief encounters with scientists striving to innovate for the betterment of mankind. Creators invariably encounter problems, and have no choice but to persevere in the face of discouragement. If the film argues anything, it is that the unbridled pursuit of new ideas makes us uniquely human."

(Sean Savage)

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TAGS

1968Albert Einstein • Alfred Nobel • American Revolution • Ancient Greeceanimated filmArab • birth of civilization • cancer research • cave painting • cavemen • celebrating human achievement • creative inspirationcreativitydark ages • development of writing • dynamite • early humans • Ernest Hemingway • Euclid • Great Pyramids at Giza • Greek achievements • hand-drawn animationhistory of ideashuman civilizationinvention of the wheelinventiveness • James Bonner • Jesse Greenstein • Leonardo da VincilibertyLouis PasteurLudwig van Beethovenman • mathematical discovery • Mayo Simon • Michelangelo • nature of creativity • nature of justice • organised labour • origin of the universe • Paul Saltman • pioneering mathematicsprogress narratives • pursuit of happiness • religion • Renato Dulbecco • Saul Bassscience historyscientific progressThomas EdisonvignetteWestern culture • Why Man Creates (1968) • zero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2011

A Town Called Panic: stop-motion film about three plastic toys named Cowboy, Indian and Horse

"Hilarious and frequently surreal, the stop–motion extravaganza A Town Called Panic has endless charms and raucous laughs for children from eight to eighty. Based on the Belgian animated cult TV series (which was released by Wallace & Gromits Aardman Studios), Panic stars three plastic toys named Cowboy, Indian and Horse who share a rambling house in a rural town that never fails to attract the weirdest events.

Cowboy and Indians plan to gift Horse with a homemade barbeque backfires when they accidentally buy 50 million bricks. Whoops! This sets off a perilously wacky chain of events as the trio travel to the center of the earth, trek across frozen tundra and discover a parallel underwater universe of pointy–headed (and dishonest!) creatures. Each speedy character is voiced – and animated – as if they are filled with laughing gas. With panic a permanent feature of life in this papier–mâché burg, will Horse and his equine paramour – flame–tressed music teacher Madame Longray (Jeanne Balibar) – ever find a quiet moment alone? A sort of Gallic Monty Python crossed with Art Clokey on acid, A Town Called Panic is zany, brainy and altogether insane–y!."

(Adriana Piasek–Wanski)

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TAGS

2009 • A Town Called Panic • Aardman Studios • Adriana Piasek-Wanski • animatedanimated filmanimation • Art Clokey • barbeque • BelgianBelgium • brainy • cowboycreaturecultFrancefrozenhorseIndian • Jeanne Balibar • low-fiLuxembourgMonty Python • Panique au Village • paper mache • papier-mache • parallel universeplastic toys • Stephane Aubier • stop motion • tundra • TVTV seriesunderwater • Vincent Patar • zany

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2009

The Impact of Japanese Comics and Animation in Asia

"Taiwanese comics are the most Japanese of all Asian comics. Many Taiwanese comic artists copy the Japanese style faithfully and one can hardly find any Taiwanese elements in their works. However, there are Taiwanese artists who have attempted to create something original based on their mastery of Japanese techniques. The most successful example is perhaps Zheng Wen who has skillfully combined Japanese (particularly Ikegami Ryoichi and Kojima Geseki's) and Western comic styles with Chinese painting and calligraphic skills in his comics, such as Stories of Assassins (cike liechuan, 1985) and Stories of Eastern Zhou Heroes (dong Zhou yingxiong chuan, 1990). Taiwanese animators have only produced a few commercial animated films and television cartoons, but they are very active in making on–line animation. The most successful Taiwanese on–line animation is perhaps Ah Kuei, a satirical and humorous short piece, in which character design and visual presentation are influenced by Japanese animated works, such as Crayon Shinchan and Chibimaruko–chan. Ah Kuei will be made into a television cartoon series, live–action drama serial and animated film. Recently, Taiwanese on–line animators have begun to experiment animated serials and movies. A three–hour on–line animated film, Love 1/2E, has been serialized. Its story is similar to Tokyo Love Story and Beautiful Life and its drawing is very Japanese. Besides, influenced by the Japanese, Taiwanese animators pay attention to the important role of 'voice actors or actresses.' (seiyu). This is an area that most other Asian nations have overlooked."

(Ng Wai–ming, Hong Kong)

Journal of Japanese Trade & Industry: July / August 2002 p.2

TAGS

Ah Kuei • animated filmanimated filmsanimationanimatoranimeAsia • Asian comics • Beautiful Life • calligraphycartooncharacter design • Chibimaruko-chan • cike liechuan • comic artistscomics • Crayon Shinchan • creative practicedesign • dong Zhou yingxiong chuan • drawingHello KittyHong Konghumour • Ikegami Ryoichi • Japanese • Kojima Geseki • live-action • Love 1/2E • online animation • satirical • seiyu • serialSingapore • Stories of Assassins • Stories of Eastern Zhou Heroes • TaiwanTaiwanese • Taiwanese comics • television cartoons • Tokyo Love Story • visual communicationvisual languagevoice actors • Zheng Wen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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