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Which clippings match 'Identity Construction' keyword pg.1 of 2
21 DECEMBER 2013

Danah Boyd: The Future of Privacy in Social Media

"Today's youth are sharing a tremendous amount of information through social media. They share to connect, but in connecting, they leave large traces of their interactions for unexpected audiences to view. Those who care about privacy are scratching their heads, trying to make sense of why youth share and what it means for the future of privacy. danah will discuss how youth understand privacy in a networked world. She will describe youths' attitudes, practices, and strategies before discussing the implications for companies and the government."

(Danah Boyd, Microsoft Corporation, recorded 6 March 2012, duration 00:30:41.

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TAGS

2012 • being connected • cheating privacy • controlDanah Boyd • data persistence • ethnographic researcheveryday cultureFacebookfriendship networks • future of privacy • hanging outidentity constructionidentity performanceMicrosoft CorporationMySpace • network privacy • network public environment • networked publicsnetworked world • networked youth • online context • online interactionsparticipationpowerpower and agencyprivacy • privacy settings • private by default • private spacepublic by default private through effortpublic spacessearchabilitysharingsocial agencysocial groomingsocial identitysocial mediasocial networking sitessocial practicestechnology affordancestraces • understanding privacy • unexpected audiences • unstructured setting • video lecture • why youth share • young people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2013

Kunsthochschule für Medien Köln: Department of Hybrid Space

"A new interdisciplinary field of design, researching the transformations of architectural, urban/regional space of the emerging 'information age', explores the dynamic interaction of architecture/urbanism and the space of mass media and communication networks. It develops scenarios for the interplay of public urban and public media space. The products of these alliances of urban/regional and media networks, of architectural and media space, are bastards: ambivalent spaces that are at the same time analog and digital, tactile and abstract, material and immaterial, expanding hyper–sensuality in the time– and placelessness of media flows. These hybrid spatial morphs act simultaneously in urban (local) and media (global) space and mediate between them, unfolding the undefined space between the local and the global, occupying the vacuum between local place and global space. Within the inversions of identity (communication), within the fluid ever–changing densities in the knitted networks, fused analogue/digital cultures are idensified."

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TAGS

Academy of Media Arts Cologne • ambivalent spaces • analogue and digital • analogue and digital cultures • architectural conjecturearchitectural space • architectural transformations • architecturebastard • changing densities • Colognecommunication networksdesign coursedesign field • Elizabeth Sikiaridi • embodied interactionsflows • Frans Vogelaar • global space • glocalglocalizationhybrid spaces • hybrid spatial morphs • hyper-sensualityidentityidentity constructionimmaterialinformation ageinformation flows • interdisciplinary design • interdisciplinary field • knitted networks • Kunsthochschule fur Medien Koln • local place • local space • mass mediamaterialitymedia arts • media flows • media networksmedia spaceplacelessnesspublic space • public urban space • regional space • tactile experience • undefined space • urban spaceurbanism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JANUARY 2013

Hyper-connectivity is transforming the nature of identity

"Social networks such as Facebook and on–line gaming are changing people's view of who they are and their place in the world, according to a report for the government's chief scientist. The report, published by Prof Sir John Beddington, says that traditional ideas of identity will be less meaningful. ... It states that the changing nature of identities will have substantial implications for what is meant by communities and by social integration.

The study shows that traditional elements that shape a person's identity, such as their religion, ethnicity, job and age are less important than they once were. Instead, particularly among younger people, their view of themselves is shaped increasingly by on–line interactions of social networks and on online role playing games.

The study found that far from creating superficial or fantasy identities that some critics suggest, in many cases it allowed people to escape the preconceptions of those immediately around them and find their 'true' identity. This is especially true of disabled people who told researchers that online gaming enabled them to socialise on an equal footing with others."

(Pallab Ghosh, 21 January 2013, BBC News)

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TAGS

2013civic engagementcountry of origincultural identitycyberpsychologyDepartment for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS) • differently enabled • digital identitydisability and social networksethnicityflash mobs • Future Identities (report) • Government Office for Sciences Foresight • greater connectivity • hyper-connectivity • hyperconnectedidentity constructionidentity performanceinterlinked dataInternet • John Beddington • LARPoccupational identitiesonline and real world identitiesonline interactions • Pallab Ghosh • personal life • place in the world • religious identity • role playing gamessmart mobssmart phonesocial changesocial cohesion • social exclusion • social identity • social integration • social networking sitessocial networkstraditional society • work identities • workplace

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 JULY 2012

Student experiences of disability social networks, in and around higher education

"For many young people social networks such as Facebook are an essential part of their student experience. Other web–based, interactive services like Wikipedia and YouTube are also an important facet of everyday student life. New technologies have always been scrutinized for their capacity to support education and, as social technologies become more pervasive, universities are under increasing pressure to appropriate them for teaching and learning. However, the educational impact of applying these Web 2.0 technologies is uncertain.

Using a Foucauldian perspective, my qualitative study explores the networked experiences of disabled students to examine how dis/ability difference is ascribed and negotiated within social networks. Data comprises 34 internet–enabled interviews with 18 participants from three English universities. Interviews incorporate the internet to expand opportunities for discussion, observation and analysis. Mobile broadband, a remote desktop viewer and screen capture have been flexibly applied together to ensure an accessible interview situation and recognise students' preferences and circumstances. Data is analysed using discourse analysis, with an attention to context framed by activity theory.

Disabled students' networked experiences are found to be complex and diverse. For a proportion, the network shifts the boundaries of disability, creating non–disabled subjectivities. For these students, the network represents the opportunity to mobilise new ways of being, building social capital and mitigating impairment.

Other participants experience the network as punitive and disabling. Disability is socio–technically ascribed by the social networking site and the networked public. Each inducts norms that constitute disability as a visible, deviant and deficit identity. In the highly normative conditions of the network, where every action is open to scrutiny, impairment is subjected to an unequal gaze that produces disabled subjectivities. For some students with unseen impairments, a social experience of disability is inducted for the first time.

As a result, students deploy diverse strategies to retain control and resist deviant status. Self–surveillance, self–discipline and self–advocacy are evoked, each involving numerous social, cognitive and technological tactics for self–determination, including disconnection. I conclude that networks function both as Technologies of the Self and as Technologies of Power. For some disabled students, the network supports 'normal' status. For others, it must be resisted as a form of social domination.

Importantly, in each instance, the network propels students towards disciplinary techniques that mask diversity, rendering disability and the possibility of disability invisible. Consequently, disability is both produced and suppressed by the network."

(Sarah Lewthwaite, Slewth Press)

TAGS

2011 • accessible interviews • Activity Theoryboundaries • building social capital • capacity to support education • cognitive tacticscontrol • deficit identity • deviance • deviant • deviant statusdifference • dis/ability • dis/ability difference • disabilitydisability and social networks • disability as a visible • disability studies • disability studies researcher • disabled students • disabled subjectivities • disabling • disconnection • discourse analysisdiversity • education researcher • educational impact • everyday student lifeFacebook • Foucauldian perspective • higher educationidentityidentity constructionidentity performance • impairment • interactive services • internet-enabled interviews • invisiblelearning and teaching • LSRI • mediated environmentsMichel Foucaultmitigating impairment • mobile broadband • networked experiences • networked publicsnew technologiesnew ways of being • non-disabled subjectivities • normal status • normative conditions • open to scrutiny • PhDPhD thesis • produced by the network • punitive • qualitative study • remote desktop • Sarah Lewthwaite • screen capture • self-advocacy • self-discipline • self-surveillance • social experience of disability • social interactionsocial media researchersocial networking servicesocial networking sitessocial networkssocial norms • social tactics • social technologies • socio-technically ascribed • student circumstancesstudent experience • student experiences of disability • student preference • students • suppressed by the network • tactictactics • technological tactics • technologies of powerthesis • unequal gaze • University of Nottingham • unseen impairments • Web 2.0 technologies • web-basedWikipediayoung peopleYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2009

Super hero comics fandom and psychosocial identity construction in late modernity

"we study the narrations of super hero comics. And we try to understand their meaning through the point of view of their consumer, their systematic reader; the comics fan who is not a pathetic hypnotized figure of consumption, or a victim of subculture, as more then 30 years of study about comics and their audience is trying desperately to prove (Wertham, 1954), but an individual who keeps the power of its personal choice. We point out the importance of the readership choice and we are trying to show what this choice means psychosocially for the person who makes it."

(Patricia Gerakopoulou, Panteion University of Athens, Greece)

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TAGS

Anthony Giddensbelongingcomicscultural codescultural signalsfandomGreeceidentityidentity constructionlate modernity • LSE • Patricia Gerakopoulou • psychosocial identity • social changesocial constructionismsocietysuperheroUlrich Beckvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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