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Which clippings match '1970' keyword pg.1 of 3
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual

"In the 1960s, the New York subways were a mess, sign–wise. Station names and metro lines were spelled out in a hodgepodge of sizes, shapes, and styles. The original mosaic tiles had been joined by cut stone and terracotta–all of which clashed with newer enamel signs. They were not only inconsistent in terms of style but also in where they were placed, so straphangers didn't know where to look for directions on how to get from point A to point B.

In 1970, following the merger of the IND and BMT lines, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) hired Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda, designers at the firm Unimark, to put an end to the typographic chaos. The system they devised still informs signs made today and is painstakingly outlined in a 174–page manual"

(Belinda Lanks, 15 September 2014, Businessweek)

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TAGS

1960s1970Bob Noorda • Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit • Christopher Bonanos • clashing design • communication designdestination identificationdirectional information • directions • fastidious detail • graphic communicationgraphic designer • Hamish Smyth • Helvetica • hodgepodge • inconsistencies • Independent Subway System (IND) • information design • instruction manual • International Typographic Style • Jesse Reed • Kickstarter • letter combination • manualMassimo Vignelli • merger • metro line • metro station • Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA • Michael Bierutmodern design • modernist graphics • New York City • New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual • New York subway • Niko Skourtis • official font • organisation and communicationPentagram Designrationalisation • reissue • sans-serif typefacesignagesignage designsigns • spacing • spatial orientation • standards manual • straphanger • style guidesubwaysymbol system • system signage • train station • typographic chaos • typography • Unimark • wayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JUNE 2013

A Class Divided: Jane Elliott's daring classroom experiment

"On the day after Martin Luther King was killed, I––one of my students came into the room and said they shot a king last night, Mrs. Elliott, why'd they shoot that king? I knew the night before that it was time to deal with this in a concrete way, not just talking about it, because we had talked about racism since the first day of school. But the shooting of Martin Luther King, who had been one of our heroes of the month in February, could not just be talked about and explained away. There was no way to explain this to little third graders in Riceville, Iowa. ...

I decided at that point that it was time to try the eye color thing, which I had thought about many, many times but had never used. So the next day I introduced an eye color exercise in my classroom and split the class according to eye color. And immediately created a microcosm of society in a third–grade classroom."

(Jane Elliott, 1985, PBS)

Frontline "A Class Divided": Season 3, Episode 9, A Class Divided (26 Mar. 1985), Director: William Peters, Writers: Charlie Cobb, William Peters.

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197019841985 • A Class Divided (1985) • ABC News (USA) • attitudes • Charlie Cobb • classroom • classroom experiment • colourcultural assumptionsdiscrimination • eye colour • human experimentationhuman subjects • Iowa • Jane Elliott • lives and attitudes • Martin Luther King • PBSprejudiceprimary schoolracial discriminationracial inequalityracism • Riceville • school pupilschool students • schoolteacher • simulation studysocial responsibility • subhuman • teacherthird gradetranscript • William Peters • women in pedagogy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JUNE 2013

The Senster: pioneering cybernetic sculpture

"The Senster, commissioned by the electronics giant, Philips, for their permanent showplace, the Evoluon, in Eindhoven, was a much bigger and more ambitious piece of work than SAM. In addition to responding to people's voices, the Senster also responded to their movements, which it detected by means of radar, and was (as far as I know) the first robotic sculpture to be controlled by a computer. It was unveiled in 1970 and remained on permanent show until 1974 when it was dismantled.

Its size – it was over 15 feet (4 m) long and could reach as high into the air – made the use of aluminium castings inappropriate, so it was welded out of steel tubing, with the castings employed only in the more intricate microphone positioning mechanism. Its behaviour, controlled by a computer, was much more subtle than SAM's but still fairly simple. The microphones would locate the direction of any predominant sound and home in on it, rather like SAM but much more efficiently, and the rest of the structure would follow them in stages if the sound persisted. Sudden movements or loud noises would make it shy away. The complicated acoustics of the hall and the completely unpredictable behaviour of the public made the Senster's movements seem a lot more sophisticated than they actually were. It soon became obvious that it was that behaviour and not anything in its appearance which was responsble for the impact which the Senster undoubtedly had on the audience."

(Aleksandar Zivanovic)

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1970acousticsart + technologyartificial intelligenceartificial life • audio activated • audio controlledautomata • computer controlled • computer historycomputer sculpturecybernetic art • cybernetic sculpture • Cybernetic Serendipitycybernetics • direction detection • Edward Ihnatowicz • Eindhoven • futuristic machineshanging mobileinteractive artinteractive toykinetic artkinetic sculpturemechanical beingmechanismmovementPhilipsradarrobotroboticrobotic sculpturerobotics • SAM (Sound Activated Mobile) • sculptureshow (spectacle)simulation • sound activated • sound sculpturespeculative design • The Senster • wonderment

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 OCTOBER 2012

The Korea Institute of Design Promotion

"Korea (South) has recognized design as the future growth engine and has introduced 'Building a Creative Design Nation' as a new government project. The Korea Institute of Design Promotion (KIDP) lies at the center of national design promotion policies. KIDP has been putting its best efforts into promoting Korea as a global leader in the design community and as a result, has created a global design portal site that will compile design information in an integrated and systematic way.

Global DesignDB.com is an integrated online service system set up to manage the latest design information for designers and others involved in the global design industry. It will act as a 'Design Navigator' for anyone interested in design. We look forward to your continuous interests and support."

(The Korea Institute of Design Promotion)

Fig.1 Suzy Sunsook Cho, Package Design [http://suzycho.blogspot.co.uk/2011/04/package–design.html].

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197021st centuryapplied arts • Building a Creative Design Nation • commoditycountry brandscreative design • creative design academy • creative design nation • creative economycreative industriescultural capitaldesign • design academy • design book cafe • design community • design companies • design information • design innovation • design navigator • design policy • design portal • design promotion • design promotion policies • designers • global design industry • government policy • government project • industrial centres • industrial competitiveness • innovative design • KIDP • knowledge economyKorea • Korea Institute of Design Promotion • national identity • North East Asia • Republic of Korea • South Korea

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2012

Roland Barthes: Readerly and Writerly Texts

"The writerly text is a perpetual present, upon which no consequent language (which would inevitably make it past) can be superimposed; the writerly text is ourselves writing, before the infinite play of the world (the world as function) is traversed, intersected, stopped, plasticized by some singular system (Ideology, Genus, Criticism) which reduces the plurality of entrances, the opening of networks, the infinity of languages."

(Roland Barthes, p.5)

1). Roland Barthes (1970). "S/Z" translated by Richard Miller, Blackwell Publishing.
2). A British one penny coin from 1903, which has been defaced by Suffragettes. Crown copyright.

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1970 • codes of meaning • Comedie Humaine • criticismdifferancegenusHonore de Balzacideology • infinity of languages • languagelisable • lisible • literary criticismnarratology • opening of networks • ourselves writing • plasticised • plural • plurality • plurality of entrances • polysemouspolysemypost-structuralismreaderly textsRoland Barthes • S/Z • Sarrasine • scriptiblestructuralism • structuralist analysis • text • text of the story • the pastwriterly texts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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