Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Consumer Behaviour' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 SEPTEMBER 2013

It's time to kill the idea that Amazon is killing independent bookstores

"Big bookstores are the ones most affected by Amazon's dominance. Borders is long gone. Barnes and Noble isn't in the best health. And Waterstones in Britain has started selling Kindles. The reason? There is very little difference between big, impersonal chain stores selling books and a big, impersonal website selling books. Independent retailers, on the other hand, have a lot to offer that Amazon cannot: niche coffee, atmosphere, serendipitous discoverability of new titles and authors, recommendations from knowledgable staff, signings and events, to name a few."

(Leo Mirani, 24 September 2013, Quartz)

1

TAGS

Amazon KindleAmazon.comambience • American Booksellers Association • Barnes and Noblebooksellersbookstores • Borders (bookshop) • boutique • boutique-publishing • chain storecoffee shopconsumer behaviourconsumptiondiscoverabilityeconomies of scale • Espresso Book Machine • eventsexperience creation • impersonal experience • in-store experienceindependent retailers • knowledgeable staff • market dominancemonopoly • Nate Hoffelder • niche market • obscure titles • recommended by the retailerself-publishingserendipitous discoverabilityserendipityshopping behaviour • signings • small businessesstumbling acrossunexpected gemsWaterstones

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 NOVEMBER 2012

Hyper Island: designing learning experiences to stay creative and competitive in an increasingly digitised world

"For over 15 years Hyper Island has been designing learning experiences for students and industry professionals alike. It all started with three men, a few beers, and one vision. The year was 1994, and multimedia pioneers Lars Lundh, Jonathan Briggs, and David Erixon converged in bar in Stockholm to discuss an upcoming CD–ROM project.

Together they realized their new digital world demanded a new kind of learning: industry–based learning. They envisioned a new institution that could prepare people for the lightening–fast pace of the modern workplace. A place where students could grow, not only as professionals, but also as human beings. ...

Hyper Island is now a thriving global presence, with two main areas of focus. Student Programs immerse young talent in intensive learning experiences from digital art direction to e–Commerce to data strategy. Executive Programs boost understanding of how digital changes societies and consumer behavior –– and how organizations need to change to stay creative and competitive in an increasingly digitized world. Hyper Island is now worldwide, located in Stockholm, Karlskrona, New York, London, and soon, Singapore. And Executive Programs teams can travel around the world designing and executing learning experiences for Fortune 500 companies and start–ups alike.

As the digital world shifts and evolves, Hyper Island continues to react and expand, creating an agile, forward–looking learning environment for students and industry leaders. What began as a bold experiment on a windswept island has become a revolutionary way to learn, reflect, collaborate, and above all, innovate."

(Charlotte Sundåker)

1

TAGS

1994 • bold experiment • CD-ROM • centre for learning • challenging students • collaborateconsumer behaviourcreativity and innovation • data strategy • David Erixon • designing learning experiences • digital art direction • digital changes societies • digital worlddigitised worlde-commerceexperiential learningHyper Islandindustry leadersindustry professionals • industry-based learning • innovate • intensive learning experiences • Jonathan Briggs • Karlskrona • Lars Lundh • learning environmentLondonmultimedia • new digital world • new kind of learning • New Yorkpersonal developmentprofessional developmentreflect • revolutionary way to learn • Singapore • stay competitive • stay creative • Stockholmstudents • Stumholmen • Swedenworkplaceyoung talent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2012

The Future of the Book: design speculation

"The Future of the Book is a design exploration of digital reading that seeks to identify new opportunities for readers, publishers, and authors to discover, consume, and connect in different formats.

As more people consume pages in pixels, IDEO designers wondered why we continue to discover and consume the written word through the old analog, page–turning model. We asked: what happens when the reading experience catches up with new technologies?

The team looked at how digital and analog books currently are being read, shared and collected, as well as at trends, business models and consumer behavior within related fields. We identified three distinct opportunities – new narratives, social reading with richer context, and providing tools for critical thinking – and developed a design concept around each one.

The first concept, 'Alice,' turns storytelling on its head by making narratives non–linear and participatory. With Alice, the story world starts bleeding into the everyday life of the reader. Real–world challenges, like acting on a phone call from the lead character, or participating in photo based scavenger hunts, unlock new aspects of the story, and turn other readers into collaborators or competitors. Alice is a platform for authors to experiment with narratives, to allow their stories to transcend media, and to engage fans in the storytelling process.

The second concept, 'Coupland,' makes book discovery a social activity by allowing readers to build shared libraries and hear about additional texts through existing networks. Coupland makes it easy for busy professionals to stay on top of industry must–reads. Businesses can assign book budgets to their employees and build collective libraries through a group–licensing model. Personal recommendations, aggregation of reading patterns, and the ability to follow inspiring individuals and groups help ensure that Coupland users always are tapped into the latest essential content within and outside of the organization.

The third concept, 'Nelson,' connects books to commentary, critique, and contextual information, letting readers explore a topic from multiple perspectives. Nelson reinforces the role of books as carriers of knowledge and insight. Readers can explore polarizing material and see whose word currently has the greatest impact on popular opinion and debate. Layers of connected commentary, news, and fact–checking augment the core book content – providing greater context and encouraging debate and scrutiny.

Each concept features a simple, accessible storytelling format and a particular look and feel. We believe that digital technology creates possibilities, so our solutions truly adapt to the new environment, rather than emulate analog qualities onscreen. For example, we resisted any temptation to move books closer to the bite–sized character of other digital media, because longhand writing encourages immersion (deep reading) and reflection."

(IDEO, 2010)

1
2

TAGS

2010Alice in Wonderlandanalogue bookbooks • collective libraries • connected commentary • consumer behaviour • contextual information • convergence • deep reading • design concept • design exploration • different formats • digital booksdigital mediadigital readingdigital technology • Douglas Coupland • end of printenvisioningformatfuture of the bookgo digitalhybrid formIDEO • inspiring individuals • intertwingularity • longhand writing • look and feelmedia formsmultiple perspectives • must-reads • narrative • new narratives • new opportunitiesnew technologiesnon-linearoff the pagepage-turning model • pages in pixels • personal recommendation • pictures under glass • reader • readersreading experience • reading patterns • rich context • shared libraries • social activity • social readingspeculative designstorystorytellingstorytelling formattechnology convergenceTed Nelsonthe future of the booktrendswritten word

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2010

Intellectual Property and Open Source: Maximize the value of your IP without alienating your fans

"New digital distribution networks are reshaping producers and consumers' attitudes towards intellectual property and fair use. New approaches to intellectual property ownership and licensing such as Creative Commons and open source are facilitating the evolution of new business models with intellectual property at the very heart of the creative value proposition. It is essential the framework is up to date, relevant, easily usable and fair. This Beacon Project will create a strong positive vision of how the creative industries will reconcile the tensions at the heart of this new era and evolve paradigms where successful artists and businesses co–exist with empowered customers. 'The speed of digital convergence and the global nature of the digital revolution bring the complex issues of intellectual property and copyright centre stage for all. Long accepted business models are being blown apart; the Internet is radically reshaping consumer attitudes and behaviour; and legal frameworks are not keeping pace. These are critical issues for a strong creative and knowledge economy for the 21st century.' Dame Lynne Brindley, CEO British Library"

(Technology Strategy Board, UK)

Fig.1 Ginger Coons (08.02.2010) 'Open' [http://adaptstudio.ca/blog/labels/_art_.html#5427215574782381910].

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2009

Product placement: personal video recorders degrading impact of conventional advertising

"Advertising has undergone many changes over the last century, moving from printed messages extolling the virtues of a product, to radio broadcasts that took the consumer's point of view into account, and on toward mass media appeals based on the television's ability to deliver a multidimensional message in a mere 30 seconds. The advent of the 'TiVo–style' personal video recorder (PVR) has degraded the impact of conventional advertising, as these PVR's allow viewers to 'zap' commercials. This has made advertisers look for other methods of putting their message before the eyes of the consumers of video media."

(Michael Bovard & Jeffrey Murray, 2005)

RIT Digital Media Library: Item 1850/5333

1

TAGS

2005advertisingbrand awarenessbrand recognitionbrandingCoca-Cola • Coke • commercialcommercialsconsumer behaviourconsumerism • embedded marketing • enterprisefilminnovation • marketing communications • mass media • multidimensional message • old media • personal video recorder • persuasionprintproductproduct endorsementproduct placementpromotion • PVR • radioremote control • RIT Digital Media Library • Rochester Institute of TechnologyshoppingsponsorshiptelevisionTIVOvideo mediazapper

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.