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Which clippings match 'Private Space' keyword pg.1 of 2
21 DECEMBER 2013

Danah Boyd: The Future of Privacy in Social Media

"Today's youth are sharing a tremendous amount of information through social media. They share to connect, but in connecting, they leave large traces of their interactions for unexpected audiences to view. Those who care about privacy are scratching their heads, trying to make sense of why youth share and what it means for the future of privacy. danah will discuss how youth understand privacy in a networked world. She will describe youths' attitudes, practices, and strategies before discussing the implications for companies and the government."

(Danah Boyd, Microsoft Corporation, recorded 6 March 2012, duration 00:30:41.

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TAGS

2012 • being connected • cheating privacy • controlDanah Boyd • data persistence • ethnographic researcheveryday cultureFacebookfriendship networks • future of privacy • hanging outidentity constructionidentity performanceMicrosoft CorporationMySpace • network privacy • network public environment • networked publicsnetworked world • networked youth • online context • online interactionsparticipationpowerpower and agencyprivacy • privacy settings • private by default • private spacepublic by default private through effortpublic spacessearchabilitysharingsocial agencysocial groomingsocial identitysocial mediasocial networking sitessocial practicestechnology affordancestraces • understanding privacy • unexpected audiences • unstructured setting • video lecture • why youth share • young people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

Mark Deuze: our lives are now intertwined with media

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TAGS

alone togetherconsuming mediacontemporary societyDanah Boyddigital technologies • Douglas Rushkoff • everyday life • in media • life in media • lived in media • lived in public • Mark Deuze • media and life converge • media and society • media as activities • media as arrangements • media as artefact • media as artefacts • media life • Media Life 2012 • media life and social change • mediated communicationmediated interactionmediated realityno life outside media • our lives are now intertwined with media • our networked life • Panasonic Life Wall • prism • private life • private spaceprivate/publicpro-d-users • producing media • produserpublic by default private through effortSherry Turkle • society in media • The Truman Show (1998) • together alone • traditional media forms • what media do • when media and life converge

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2010

The Open City: The Closed System and The Brittle City

"The idea of an open city is not my own: credit for it belongs to the great urbanist Jane Jacobs in the course of arguing against the urban vision of Le Corbusier. She tried to understand what results when places become both dense and diverse, as in packed streets or squares, their functions both public and private; out of such conditions comes the unexpected encounter, the chance discovery, the innovation. Her view, reflected in the bon mot of William Empson, was that 'the arts result from over–crowding'. Jacobs sought to define particular strategies for urban development, once a city is freed of the constraints of either equilibrium or integration. These include encouraging quirky, jerry–built adaptations or additions to existing buildings; encouraging uses of public spaces which don't fit neatly together, such as putting an AIDS hospice square in the middle of a shopping street. In her view, big capitalism and powerful developers tend to favour homogeneity: determinate, predictable, and balanced in form. The role of the radical planner therefore is to champion dissonance. In her famous declaration: 'if density and diversity give life, the life they breed is disorderly'. The open city feels like Naples, the closed city feels like Frankfurt."

(Richard Sennett, 2006)

Fig.1 Busy street in Naples, marlenworld.com
Fig.2 Paris, Les Olympiades, 1969–1974, Thierry Bézecourt in 2005
[3] Sennett, R. (2006). The Open City: The Closed System and The Brittle City. Urban Age.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2009

'Hello World!'

"Hello World! is a large–scale audio visual installation comprised of thousands of unique video diaries gathered from the internet. The project is a meditation on the contemporary plight of democratic, participative media and the fundamental human desire to be heard.

On one hand, new media technologies like YouTube have enabled new speakers at an alarming rate. On the other hand, no new technologies have emerged that allow us to listen to all of these new public speakers. Each video consists of a single lone individual speaking candidly to a (potentially massive) imagined audience from a private space such as a bedroom, kitchen, or dorm room. The multi–channel sound composition glides between individuals and the group, allowing viewers to listen in on unique speakers or become immersed in the cacophony. Viewers are encouraged to dwell in the space."

(Christopher Baker)

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TAGS

artaudiovisualbedroomcacophony • candid • Christopher Baker • cultural signals • dorm room • exhibition • Hello World! • installationInternetkitchenparticipative mediaprivate spacesocial constructionismsocial interactionsocial media projectsocial realitysocietyUSAvideo • video diary • VimeovoyeurismYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2005

Un-private house: private becomes public

"The incorporation of technology, as an integrated aspect of modern society, has caused the home/private sphere to become more public in theory as well as in actuality. The accessibility of the outside/public sphere from within the home with the use of technology and the opportunity to work inside the home has become an increasingly popular phenomenon."

(Tanya Oh, Art History 192, Semester 1/Spring 2004, University of California)

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TAGS

2004 • Gisue Hariri • Hariri and Haririhomehome and living • Mojgan Hariri • privacyprivate spaceprivate/publicpublic space • Tanya Oh • The Digital Houseurban design
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