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Which clippings match 'Dead-end Technology' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 MARCH 2013

WW1 Razzle Dazzle ship camouflage

"Most camouflage is based on the idea of concealment and blending in with its surroundings. However another school of thought has argued for making the item in question appear to be a mashup of unrelated components. Naval camoufleurs found this theory particularly appealing. Blending didn't work because ships operated in two different and constantly changing color environments – sea and sky. Any camo that concealed in one environment was usually spectacularly conspicuous in others.

Norman Wilkinson, a British naval officer and painter, suggested a scheme that came to be known as Dazzle or Razzle Dazzle painting. Wilkinson believed that breaking up a ship's silhouette with brightly contrasting geometric designs would make it harder for U–boat captains to determine the ship's course."

(FoundNYC Inc, 4 April 2009)

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TAGS

1917angular shapesappearanceapplication of design • battleship • blend in • blending • blending in • blocks of colourbreaking up • bulk • camo • camouflage • camouflage pattern • colourcolour schemeconcealment • conspicuous • constantly changing • dazzle • dazzle painting • dazzle ship painting • dead-end technology • disruption pattern • disruptive colouration • disruptive patterndistortiongeometric designsinterruptioninvisibilitymilitary • naval camouflage • naval camoufleurs • navy • Norman Wilkinson • optical illusionoutlinepainting • Razzle Dazzle • sea • seascape • shapesshipsilhouetteskyspatial ordersurroundings • U-boat • unrelated components • vessel • visual abstractionvisual patternvorticismWorld War IWW1zig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2009

Sound Mirrors: dead-end technology

"Pioneered by the obsessive Dr W.S. Tucker of the Royal Engineers, the concrete sound mirrors were intended to provide early warning of incoming enemy aeroplanes and airships about to attack coastal towns.

But with the development of faster aircraft and the increasing racket from the holiday resort down the road, the effectiveness of the mirrors twindled as an aircraft would be within sight by the time it had been located. The last nail was finally driven into the coffin of this uniquely English folly by the evolution of radar systems, so by 1934 they had tragically became obsolete."

(David Barrington, 04.07.2006)

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TAGS

19161930s1934 • acoustic mirrors • aeroplaneaircraft • airships • architectureconcretedead-end technology • early warning • engineeringEnglandenvironmentindustrial archaeologyindustrial designlistening earsmilitary complexmilitary hardwaremirrornational securityobsolescenceobsolete technologyradar • Royal Engineers • sound mirror • techno-scientifictechnologyUK • W.S. Tucker • World War IWW1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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