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Which clippings match 'World War I' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 JUNE 2017

Sons of Gallipoli: award-winning interactive documentary

"While the story of Gallipoli has been told many times, never has it been told in such a rich and deeply immersive way. For the first time, the tragedy of Gallipoli is brought to life in a profoundly human way as two mothers imagine what it must have been like for other mothers, 100 years ago. Two women on opposite sides. So different. Yet each struggling to understand the meaning of war."

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TAGS

19151916ANZACAotearoa New Zealandarchive footageAustralasiaAustralia • British Commonwealth • circular interface • Commonwealth • Commonwealth countries • Commonwealth of Nations • Cook Islands • cultural heritagedigital heritageGallipoli Campaign • Gallipoli peninsula • hypermedia • immersive cultural heritage experiences • immersive storytellinginteractive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive experienceinteractive mediainteractive multimedia documentaryinteractive multimedia videointeractive web documentary • military failures • military history • Niue • Ottoman EmpirePapua New Guinea • Pitcairn Islands • Samoa • Tonga • Turkishwarweb based non-linear narrativesweb documentarywebdocWorld War IWWI

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2014

BBC launches new interactive drama Footballers United

"Footballers United features five chapters which consist of video, audio, image and text content, with the overall experience being around 60 minutes. Archived content is presented by well-known football player Gemma Fay, Captain and Goalkeeper of the Scottish National Women's Football team. ...

Audience interaction: Each part of the story is a standalone piece of content which is shareable online. A clever interactive timeline prompts the audience to access related archive content, such as images, text and video. When selected, this content appears as an overlay on the screen, with the drama paused in the background.

For a more personal experience the audience can sign in via Facebook and the timeline maps events in WW1 to their social media graph; showing how their friends and a modern day social community would have fared throughout the war. For example, when the viewer pass the first day of the Somme in the drama, a social item will appear that shows the number of their friends that would have lost their lives had they been in the battle at the time."

(BBC Media Centre, 11 December 2014)

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2014 • a whole generation • Alex Winckler • archive footageaudience interactionBBC History • BBC Learning • BBC Taster • changes for women • changing lives • creative nonfiction • culture change • curated content • devastating effects • digital storytelling • docu-fiction • docufictionEdinburghexpository addendum • factual format • factually accurate narrative • fictional and archived content • football player • football teamFootballers United (2014) • Gemma Fay • Heart of Midlothian (football team) • historical drama • Holly Jack • interactive digital narrativesinteractive dramainteractive features • interactive guide • interactive mediainteractive storytellinginteractive timeline • iWonder • Keiran Gallacher • Leah Byrne • linear drama • literary nonfiction • multimedia storytelling • narrative nonfiction • new responsibilities • new sense of freedom • online multimedia • playing football • related archive content • Robert Armitage • Scotland • Scottish National Womens Football • supporting content • Tim Wright • timeline • true story • World War Iyoung people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2013

The Vorticists: a short-lived 20th century avant garde art movement

"The vorticists did not have many members; nor did the movement last long, because of unfortunate timing – it formed in 1914 as Europe hurtled towards war. By 1918 there was not much appetite for dogmatic groups such as theirs.

Nevertheless, the group holds an important place in 20th–century British art history.

'They were the first abstract modernist group in Britain,' said Stephens. 'It inevitably comes out of the revolution of cubism, but then, so does everything in the 20th century.'

They were part of a maelstrom of new, aggressive art 'ism' movements, not least the one practised by the Italian futurists, who were, in Lewis's eyes, the bad guys.

Stephens said: 'Unlike the futurists, who celebrate the energy of the machine and actual war as a purging force, the vorticists were engaged in more universal ideas of identity, time and movement in a philosophical sense.'"

(Mark Brown, 13 June 2011, The Guardian)

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1914 • 20th century • abstract modernist group • aggressive art • Alvin Langdon Coburn • angular shapesart exhibitionart movementavant-garde • Blast (journal) • British art • cometism • cubismcubist and abstract art • David Bomberg • disruptive pattern • Dore Gallery • Dorothy Shakespear • Edward Wadsworth • Ezra Pound • Futurism (art movement)Hayward Gallery • Helen Saunders • ism • jazz rhythm • Lawrence Atkinson • maelstrom • Manifesto for a Modern World • movementpaintingpattern • Penguin Club • purging force • short-lived • Tate Britainthe energy of the machine • universal ideas • universal modernity • vanished works • visual abstractionvorticism • vorticists • William Robertswomen artistswomen in art and designWorld War IWyndham Lewis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2013

WW1 Razzle Dazzle ship camouflage

"Most camouflage is based on the idea of concealment and blending in with its surroundings. However another school of thought has argued for making the item in question appear to be a mashup of unrelated components. Naval camoufleurs found this theory particularly appealing. Blending didn't work because ships operated in two different and constantly changing color environments – sea and sky. Any camo that concealed in one environment was usually spectacularly conspicuous in others.

Norman Wilkinson, a British naval officer and painter, suggested a scheme that came to be known as Dazzle or Razzle Dazzle painting. Wilkinson believed that breaking up a ship's silhouette with brightly contrasting geometric designs would make it harder for U–boat captains to determine the ship's course."

(FoundNYC Inc, 4 April 2009)

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1917angular shapesappearanceapplication of design • battleship • blend in • blending • blending in • blocks of colourbreaking up • bulk • camo • camouflage • camouflage pattern • colourcolour schemeconcealment • conspicuous • constantly changing • dazzle • dazzle painting • dazzle ship painting • dead-end technology • disruption pattern • disruptive colouration • disruptive patterndistortiongeometric designsinterruptioninvisibilitymilitary • naval camouflage • naval camoufleurs • navy • Norman Wilkinson • optical illusionoutlinepainting • Razzle Dazzle • sea • seascape • shapesshipsilhouetteskyspatial ordersurroundings • U-boat • unrelated components • vessel • visual abstractionvisual patternvorticismWorld War IWW1zig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2013

Call to Order: the subordination of the matter to the light of the form

"The French poet and filmmaker, Jean Cocteau, is usually given the credit for the title by which the neoclassical revival of the 1920′s and early 1930′s is known. Le Rappel a l'ordre or the Call to Order summoned the civilized world to its senses. These were the very organs, you will recall, that had been ripped away by a shell fragment in Dix's Skin Graft.

This 'call to order' actually had its roots in French wartime propaganda. The virtues of France's Latin–based civilization were ranged against the Teutonic brutalism of the Germans. Before the war, néoclassicisme had languished like a discarded stage prop. In 1918, with the 'Huns' surging for a second time toward the gates of Paris, Cocteau and others summoned the cultural icons of Greece and Rome to join the Allied ranks. That year, Cocteau published a book, Le Coq et l'Arlequin, which he revised and renamed in 1924 as Le Rappel a l'ordre. The message was the same, without the 'us versus them' jingoism of the war: civilization must look to its ancient past to regain its bearings and enhance its vitality.

Cocteau's thesis found an appreciative audience in many circles, including the United States. According to French writer Jacques Maritain, 'what makes the purity of the true classic is … a subordination of the matter to the light of the form.' The discipline and dedication of the artist would admit only the essential elements of art into the work being created, excluding anything that would 'debauch' the senses of the viewer."

(Ed Voves, 4 October 2010)

TAGS

1920s19241930s • ancient past • brutalismcall to orderchaos and classicism • civilized world • classical formcreative fundamentalism • cultural icons • debauch • enhance vitality • essential elements of artessentialismGermanGreek • Jacques Maritain • Jean Cocteaujingoism • light of the form • neoclassical • neoclassical revivalneoclassicism • neoclassicisme • nostalgiapurity • regain bearings • return to order • revival • Romanromanticism • senses of the viewer • Teutonic • Teutons • true classic • us versus them • wartime • wartime propaganda • World War I

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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