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Which clippings match 'Design Intelligence' keyword pg.1 of 3
23 MARCH 2017

Ten years of smartphones (and visions of a circular economy)

"Smartphones sind schlecht zu reparieren, schlecht aufzurüsten, schlecht zu recyceln. Für die Konsumentinnen ist das ärgerlich – und kann für die Hersteller richtig teuer werden. ...

Dass Mobiltelefone eine längere Lebensdauer haben, ist aber ein wichtiger Beitrag zum Umweltschutz: Für ihre Herstellung werden Edelmetalle und so genannte Seltene Erden gebraucht, die unter grossem Energieaufwand und mittels gesundheitsschädigender Chemikalien gefördert werden. Jedes reparierte Telefon schont Ressourcen. Im Auftrag von Greenpeace berechnete das deutsche Oeko-Institut, dass sich die Smartphone-Lebensdauer im Schnitt um 1,5 Jahre verlängern liesse. Nimmt man all das zusammen – Energieaufwand, kurze Lebensspanne und geringe Recyclingquote – wird klar, dass es so nicht endlos weitergehen kann."

(Greenpeace Schweiz, 1 March 2017)

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20072017animated explainer videocell phone • circular economy • consumer electronicsconsumerismconsumptiondesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumptione-waste • energy expenditure • environmental damage • environmental protection • environmentalismgood designgreen designGreenpeace • Greenpeace Schweiz • harmful chemicalsinternational environmental health and sustainability issues • life span • long-lasting productslonger-lasting productsobsolescence • Oeko-Institut • Oko-Institut • patterns of consumptionplanned obsolescenceprecious metals • product cycles cause • rare earths • recycle and repair • recycling rate • renewable resources • service life • short-lived devices • smartphone • smartphone lifetime • smartphone production • sustainabilitysustainable design principles • technical habits • technology sector

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

A proof of concept of technology which is born to die

"John Rogers is a professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the university. Rogers says the goal of the 'born to die' program is to design transient technology that can dissolve at the end of its useful life, thus saving space in landfills and reducing waste. The research team isn't there yet. But it has designed a chip built on a thin film of silk that dissolves when hit with water."

(Associated Press)

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TAGS

applied research • Associated Press • born to die • design innovationdesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumption • dissolvable materials • e-wasteelectronicsend of lifeimpermanenceinorganic refuse • John Rogers • material interventionsmaterial worldmaterials sciencenew materialsobsolescenceproof of conceptself-destroyingself-destructing • silk • thin filmthrow-away • transient tech • transient technology • University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • useful life • water soluble

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MAY 2011

Metadesigners Open Network: re-thinking the way designers are taught and practice

"Metadesign is an emerging conceptual framework within which designers will be able to work together in a more coherent and holistic way. Why? Because designing greener products and services will not be enough to remedy the environmental crisis that we face in the 21st century. We need more 'joined–up' ways to feed, clothe, shelter, assemble, communicate and live together. This will mean re–thinking the way that designers are taught, practice and organize themselves. It also entails re–designing design itself."

(Metadesigners Open Network)

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TAGS

21st centuryAHRC • Attainable Utopias • commodityconsumptiondesign intelligencedesign practicedesign responsibilitydesigners • Designing in the 21st Century • Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council • environmental crisisethicsGoldsmiths College (University of London) • greener products • greener services • holistic • joined-up • metadesign • Metadesigners Open Network • re-designing design • sustainabilityUniversity of Londonwaste • Writing Purposefully in Art and Design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MAY 2011

The Story of Stuff: The Story of Electronics

"So, some time ago I was shown this video 'The Story of Stuff', a project created by Annie Leonard. She is an environmentalist who worked on international environmental health and sustainability issues, among other things like Greenpeace International, Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and others.

This project has, so far, 2 seasons, the first with 7 short animated videos explaining some of our everyday environmental, social and economic problems and how they're related to one another. The second season is more focused on what is behind these social, environmental and economical problems and how we can act on them."

(Letícia Neves, 23 March 2011)

Fig.1 Annie Leonard (9 November 2010). 'The Story of Electronics'

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TAGS

2010activismanimated explainer videoanimated presentation • Annie Leonard • commoditycritiquedesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumptione-wasteecological • economic issues • electronicselectronics industry • Electronics TakeBack Coalition • environmental issuesenvironmentalistethicseverydayexploitationgadget • GAIA • Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives • green design • green race to the top • Greenpeace • Greenpeace International • high-tech revolution • innovationinternational environmental health and sustainability issueslong-lasting products • manufacturing industry • miningobsolescencePeoples Republic of Chinapoison • poisoned workers • recyclable • recyclingresponsibility • responsible recycling • social changesocial issues • Story of Electronics • Story of Stuff • sustainability • toxic-free products • toxicological effectswaste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2010

NextNature: What is our concept of nature?

"Despite the global awareness of our fragile relation with nature and the countless projects initiated to restore the balance, almost no one has asked the question: What is our concept of nature? And how is our relation with nature changing? ...

This website explores our changing notion of nature. How nature has become one of the most successful products of our time, yet much of what we perceive as nature is merely a simulation: a romanticized idea of a balanced, harmonic, inherently good and threatened entity. How evolution continues nonetheless. How technology–traditionally created to protect us from the forces of nature–gives rise to a next nature, that is just as wild, cruel, unpredictable and threatening as ever. How we are playing with fire again and again. How we should be careful in doing so, yet how this is also what makes us human."

(NextNature.net)

Fig.1 Aaron Koblin (2008). 'Video capture of SMS visualization tool looking at the city of Amsterdam on New Years Eve 2007. Data from KPN Telcom.'

Fig.2 Julia Müller, Arjan Groot and Menno Wittebrood. 'Birthmarks tattoo', Identity Matters magazine.

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applied researchawareness raisingbio-ethicsclimate changeconsumptiondesign intelligencedesign responsibilityenvironmentethicsgenetic engineering • human impact • industrialinformation aesthetics • Koert van Mensvoort • manufacturingnaturalnature • NextNature • obsolescenceposthumanreflexive modernisationromanticismsocial changesustainability • technological impact • technology and nature • transformationvisualisationwaste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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