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Which clippings match 'Eye (magazine)' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 DECEMBER 2013

Design genius or author as editor: filtering and synthesising?

"In 'What is an author?' [4], Michel Foucault says we are 'accustomed to presenting the author as a genius.' We see the author as the 'genial creator' of work in which he gives us, 'with infinite wealth and generosity,' an inexhaustible world of meanings. (Being 'creative' always has a positive ring, whatever is produced!) Foucault says that the author does not 'precede' the work: ideas and meanings are already there and the author's role is to 'choose,' to filter and synthesise to create output. (Foucault also emphasises 'limiting' and 'excluding'). The author's role is to limit the proliferation of meanings and present a personal view of the world. Yet the 'genius author' is represented as a continual source of invention–the opposite of his genuine function."

(Monika Parrinder, 2000, Eye Magazine)

TAGS

April Greiman • art and designart market • art star • artisanartist • artist myth • artistic solutions • Atelier Populaire • auteur theoryauthor as editorauthor as geniusavant-garde artists • being creative • blur boundaries • bohemian • Brigit Fowler • Bruce Mau • canonisation • celebritycliche • constructed idea • creative geniuscreative individuals • creative intuition • cult of the author • cult of the individual • cultural elite • Cunst Art • cutting-edge innovationsDavid Carsondesign community • Design Quarterly • design star • designer as author • editing through selectionEuropean EnlightenmentEye (magazine)fine art • Fran Cottell • genial creatorgenius • genius author • genius creator • genius mythgenius of the individual • genius status • graphic authorship • graphic design • Griselda Pollock • Hard Werken • history of ideas • ID Magazine • ingenue • innate talent • inspired visionaries • intuitioninventionJohn Maeda • John Walker • legitimate discipline • liberal artslone genius • lone pioneer • madman • maverick graphic designer • Michael Howe • Michael RockMichel Foucaultmodernismmyth of the geniusNeville Brodynon-conformist • ordinary mortal • Paul RandPentagram Designpersonapersonal expressionpersonal visionpersonalityPeter SavillePierre Bourdieupioneerromantic notion of the artist • Rozsika Parker • self-aggrandisement • self-taught • semi-divine status • solitary • spiritual insight • status • talenttaste (sociology) • Terry Jones • Tomato (design agency)tortured soul • ubermeister • visionary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2013

The debate in 1991: digital or hand-crafted type?

"Metal setting is practised today by only a handful of specialists, but it continues to provide the standards by which good typesetting is judged. Photosetting, and the computer setting which has largely displaced it, are criticised for being too perfect and lacking the character of hand–crafted type. Now, increasingly, designers are using desktop publishing systems such as the Macintosh to do their typesetting. The technology has matured considerably over the last two years and the time is ripe for a reassessment: is good typesetting possible on the Macintosh?"

(Andy Benedek, 1991)

Andy Benedek (1991). "The craft of digital type" Winter no. 2 vol. 1, Eye Magazine.

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TAGS

1991Adobe Systems • Aldus PageMaker • AppleApple LaserWriter • bit-mapped font • computer font • computer typesetting • Courier (typeface) • descender • design craftdesign for printdesktop publishingdisplay font • Emigre (magazine) • Eye (magazine) • font foundry • graphic designerhand-craftedhand-crafted typeHelvetica • hot metal typesetting • individual characterlegibility • letter-spacing • letterpress • Linotype (foundry) • MacMacintoshMacintosh computermetal type • metal typesetting • monotypeoffset printing • optical compensation • page description language • page layoutperfection • photosetting • PostScript • PostScript typeface • technology affordances • Times (typeface) • too perfect • traditional practicestypefacetypesettingtypography • Unternehmensberatung Rubow Weber • URW

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2011

Green USP? Greenwashing and design in the age of ethical consumption

"In the contemporary era of heightened green awareness and 'ethical consumption', major companies have quickly realised that consumers are looking for greener brands, writes Lynne Ciochetto. Design has played a key role in reinventing company profiles with new environmental messages, and designers should question these claims.

As companies have started using green concepts or claims in their advertising, branding and marketing a trend has emerged called 'greenwashing'. 'Greenwashing' refers to marketing is that is misleading, untruthful or creates false impressions (see Fred Pearce's column in the Guardian)."

(Lynne Ciochetto, 24 March 2010)

Fig.1 2010 Toyota Prius "Harmony" TV Commercial

Fig.2 Nick Turner, "BP Exec", from Art Not Oil satirising BP's revamped green corporate identity.

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TAGS

advertising • Art Not Oil • BP • BP Exec • brandingcommodity • company profiles • consumptioncorporate identity • design in the age of ethical consumption • design journaldesign responsibilityemotive manipulation • environmental messages • ethical consumptionethicsEye (magazine) • Fred Pearce • graphic design • green awareness • green claims • green concepts • green corporate identity • greener brands • greenwashing • impression managementLynne CiochettomarketingmisleadingtrendsUSP

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 NOVEMBER 2009

Male-gazing in NZ, Russia and NYC

"Much advertising in the past has been about creating new needs and taboos that can be met by products, writes Lynne Ciochetto, as I noted in my Eye 59 article 'Advertising and the globalisation of aspiration'. Throughout most of the twentieth century, the focus has been on the female market.

However as markets in the west become saturated, the male market has been redefined in terms of products, and the representation of men has broadened beyond the narrow stereotypes of the past. For decades after the 1960s, the masculine ideal was epitomised by 'Marlboro Man', regarded within advertising as the man every man wanted to be and that every woman wanted to be with."

(Lynne Ciochetto, 2009, Eye Magazine)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2008

Look inward: graphic design in Australia

"In Melbourne, Studio Anybody started five years ago with the intention of developing an alternative model of graphic design practice. 'In focusing on concept–driven exhibitions, publications and installations, we hoped to develop alternative communication strategies, learn new skills, stay motivated and make people stop, laugh and reflect,' explains Lisa Grocott, one of the five partners. Grocott, a New Zealander, teaches postgraduate design at RMIT University and her academic approach to professional practice remains the exception among Australian designers, though it is shared by the other four members of the team. They have managed to combine self–initiated projects with work for the Australian clothing label Mooks, as well as the Melbourne Fashion Festival. The central question for Studio Anybody is to what extent it will be possible to find more hardnosed commercial clients who will permit an exploratory approach."

(Rick Poynor, Issue 46, Winter 2002, Eye Magazine)

Fig.1 Dean Millson "Studio Anybody" 3 March 2010.

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TAGS

1998 • academic approach • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralasiaAustralia • Australian designers • brokeragebusiness incubator • clothing label • commercial clients • communication strategy • concept-driven • creative industriesdesign studio • exploratory approach • Eye (magazine)graduate bridgegraphic designgraphic design practice • hardnosed • Lisa Grocott • Melbourne • Melbourne Fashion Festival • Mooks (clothing label) • New Zealander • postgraduate design • professional practicereal-life studioRMIT University • self-initiated projects • Studio Anybody • transition into post-graduate employmentwork placement

CONTRIBUTOR

David Gowans
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