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Which clippings match Simon Perkins' concept of 'Randomness' pg.1 of 5
24 NOVEMBER 2016

Download Finished (2006): a procedural video machine

"Download Finished was an online ressource which transformed and re-published films from P2P networks and online archives. Found footage became the rough material for the transformation machine, which translated the underlying data structure of the films onto the surface of the screen. The original images dissolved into pixels, thus making the hidden data structure visible. Through Download Finished, file sharers became authors by re-interpreting their most beloved films. ...

Download Finished questions the relationship between the original and its copy in a digital environment. It deals with questions arising from the cultural practice of file sharing (and the breakages and voids it makes evident within the copyright system)."

(!Mediengruppe Bitnik)

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!Mediengruppe Bitnik (arts collective) • 2006 • Adnan Hadzi • aesthetics • algorithmic reconfiguration • algorithmic remixing • algorithmic transformation • art projectartefactingauthorship • automatic composition • Carmen Weisskopf • chance artcorrupting digital datacut-up • Daniel Ryser • data glitches • data remixing • databendingdigital aestheticsdigital detritusdigital errorsdigital materialismdistortion • Domagoj Smoljo • Download Finished (2006) • found footage • generative works • glitch aestheticsglitch practitionersglitched out video • online ressource • P2P • procedural remixing • procedural transformation • procedural video machine • re-publishreinterpretation • reinterpreting • remixedrepurposingsynthesis machines • system-based synthesise • systems arttech-art • transformation machine • transformed by technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2015

What is the Cut-Up Method?

"The writer Ken Hollings examines how an artistic device called the 'cut-up' has been employed by artists and satirists to create new meanings from pre-existing recorded words.

Today's digital age has allowed multi-media satirists like Cassetteboy to mock politicians and TV celebrities online by re-editing - or cutting up - their broadcast words. But the roots of this technique go back to the early days of the avant-garde. The intention has always been to amuse, to surprise, and to question.

The founder of the Dadaist movement, the poet Tristan Tzara, proposed in 1920 that a poem could be created simply by pulling random words cut from a newspaper out of a hat. And it was this idea of the random juxtaposition of text, of creating new meanings from pre-existing material, that so appealed to the painter Brion Gysin in the late 1950s when he and his friend, the American writer William S Burroughs, began applying the technique not just to text but to other media too - including words recorded on tape."

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1920absurdist humourAlan Sugar • Armando Iannucci • artistic device • avant-garde experimental technique • BBC Radio 1 • BBC Radio 4Brion Gysin • broadcast news • Cassetteboy • Chris Morris • Coldcut (duo) • collaged togethercut-upcut-up techniqueDada movement • Dan Shepherd • Doug KahnGeorge W Bush • Julie Andrews • juxtaposition • Ken Hollings • Kevin Foakes (aka DJ Food) • Lenka Clayton • Matt Black • mockingNegativland • Pierre Schaeffer • pulled out of the hat • random juxtaposition • random wordsre-editre-purposeremix cultureRonald Reagan • sound-poetry • State of the Union • tape cut-up • The Apprentice (UK TV series)The Sound of Music (1965)Tristan TzaraVicki BennettWalter RuttmannWilliam Burroughs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2014

An Informal Catalogue of Slit-Scan Video Artworks and Research

"Slitscan imaging techniques are used to create static images of time–based phenomena. In traditional film photography, slit scan images are created by exposing film as it slides past a slit–shaped aperture. In the digital realm, thin slices are extracted from a sequence of video frames, and concatenated into a new image.

Recently I've seen many new–media projects based on slit–scan techniques. They range from student projects, to Java demonstrations on the Processing.org site, to works by recognized pioneers of video and interactive art. My inclination to make lists is irresistible, and so I've put together this catalogue as an aid to researchers and students. My aim is to be as inclusive as possible, rather than attempt to winnow the projects down to just a few ideal exemplars or the most significant historic precursors. Thus not all of the examples are even computational: some of the projects described below use motion–picture film, still photography, or analog video techniques."

(Golan Levin)

Compiled by Golan Levin. Begun: 1 March 2005. Last edit: 17 July 2010.

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Adam Finkelstein • Adam MagyarAlexei Shulgin • Allison Klein • Alvaro Cassinelli • Andrew Davidhazy • Andy Polaine • Angus Leadley Brown • Anna Szepesi • Ansen Seale • Aristarkh Chernyshev • Bill Spinhoven • Bjorn Barnekow • Bradford Bohonus • Brendan Dawes • Bryan Mumford • Camille Utterback • Christian Hossner • Christian Kessler • Christian Rohner • chronophotography • Claude Hidber • computational art • Dan Kaminsky • Daniel CrooksDaniel Rozin • Daniel Sauter • Datadouche • David Tinapple • Derek Burnett • Dietmar Offenhuber • Dirk Lusebrink • divisionism • Don Whitaker • Douglas Trumbull • E.J. Gone • Eddie Elliott • Egbert Mittelstadt • epipolar diagram • Eric Lee • Fabian Thommen • Geert Mul • George Silk • Glen Murphy • Golan Levin • Greg Ercolano • Guy Hoffman • HC Gilje • He-Lin Luo • image stretching • Jacques-Henri Lartigue • James Seo • Jean-Michel Jarre • Ji-Hoon Byun • Joachim Sauter • Joe Baldwin • Juanjo Fernandez Rivero • Jussi Angesleva • Keith Lam • Kenji Mase • Kevin Atkinson • Kurt Ralske • Mark Hauenstein • Martin Hilpoltsteiner • Martin Reinhart • Masatoshi Ishikawa • Masayuki Akamatsui • Mateusz Herczka • mechanical technique • Michael Aschauer • Michael Cohen • Michael Naimark • Michael Terry • Mindfukc • Miska Knapek • Mitchell Whitelaw • Mogens Jacobsen • multiperspective panorama • Neil Jenkins • new media aestheticsNHK • Nicolas Horne • NYX • Osman Khan • Paul de Marinis • Paul Harter • Peter-Pike Sloan • Pipilotti Rist • Processing (software) • R Greenberg Associates • Robert Seidel • rolling shutter • Roman Haefeli • Romy Achituv • Ross Cooper • Roy Tanck • Sascha Pohflepp • scanner photography • scanning digital camera • scannography • scanography • Scott Carver • Scott Owsley • Sid Fels • slit-scan cameraslit-scan photography • slit-scan techniques • slit-shaped aperture • space-time correlation • space-time representation • spacio-temporal imaging • spatiotemporal imaging • Steina Vasulka • Stephan Schulz • streak photography • strip photography • Susanne Jaschko • synchroballistic photography • Tamas Waliczky • Tania Ruiz Gutierrez • temporal displacement map • temporal movementtime slicingtime-based art • time-based phenomena • time-motion studiesToshio Iwaivideo and digital art • videogram • Virgil Wildrich • William Larson • Zbig Rybczynski

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 SEPTEMBER 2014

Automatic Art: human and machine processes that make art

Exhibition: 3 July–10 September 2014, GV Art gallery, London, 49 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London W1U 6LY.

"This exhibition presents 50 years of British art that is generated from strict procedures. The artists make their work by following rules or by writing computer programs. They range from system–based paintings and drawings to evolving computer generated images."

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2014algorithmic art • Anthony Hill • Automatic Art (exhibition) • boredomresearch • British artchance artcomputer artcomputer art practicecomputer generated artcomputerised artdesign formalismdigital art exhibitiondigital artworkdigital materialism • Dominic Boreham • Ernest Edmonds • exhibitiongenerative artgenerative designgouache • GV Art Gallery • Harold Cohen • Jeffrey Steele • John Carter • Julie Freeman • Kenneth Martin • latticemachine-made • Malcolm Hughes • Michael Kidner • Nathan Cohen • orderly patternsorganisational processPaul Brown • Paul Smith (boredomresearch) • Peter Lowe • procedural artprocess artrule-based work • Sean Clark • simple rulesStephen BellStephen Scrivener • Steve Sproates • Susan Tebby • system-based drawing • system-based painting • systems art • Terry Pope • Trevor Clarke • Vicky Isley (boredomresearch) • visual abstractionvisual art • William Latham

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2014

Handwritten directions from strangers used to map Manhattan

"A map of Manhattan composed of hand–drawn maps by various New York pedestrians whom the artist asked for directions.

Pretending to be a tourist by wearing a souvenir cap and carrying a shopping bag of Century 21, a major tourist shopping place, I ask various New York pedestrians to draw a map to direct me to another location. I connect and place these small maps based on actual geography in order to make them function as parts of a larger map."

(Nobutaka Aozaki, 2012)

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2012around us • asking for directions • cartographycity maps • draw a map • geographical locationhand-drawnhand-drawn mapshand-scrawledlocation-specificManhattanmapmapmakingmappingNew YorkNew Yorker • Nobutaka Aozaki • outline drawingpedestrianpersonal cartographyphysical geographyphysical spaceplacerandomness • shopping bag • souvenir cap • spatial environments • tourist • urban mappingwayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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