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Which clippings match Simon Perkins' concept of 'Surrealism' pg.1 of 7
29 AUGUST 2017

On the Passage of a few People through a Rather Brief Moment in Time: The Situationist International 1956-1972

"The Situationist International (SI) was an international organization of social revolutionaries, the exclusive membership of which was made up of avant-garde artists, intellectuals, and political theorists, active from its formation in 1957 to its dissolution in 1972.

The intellectual foundations of the Situationist International were derived primarily from anti-authoritarian Marxism and the avant-garde art movements of the early 20th century, particularly Dada and Surrealism. Overall, situationist theory represented an attempt to synthesize this diverse field of theoretical disciplines into a modern and comprehensive critique of mid-20th century advanced capitalism. The situationists recognized that capitalism had changed since Marx's formative writings, but maintained that his analysis of the capitalist mode of production remained fundamentally correct; they rearticulated and expanded upon several classical Marxist concepts, such as his theory of alienation. In their expanded interpretation of Marxist theory, the situationists asserted that the misery of social alienation and commodity fetishism were no longer limited to the fundamental components of capitalist society, but had now in advanced capitalism spread themselves to every aspect of life and culture. They resolutely rejected the idea that advanced capitalism's apparent successes—such as technological advancement, increased income, and increased leisure—could ever outweigh the social dysfunction and degradation of everyday life that it simultaneously inflicted.

Essential to situationist theory was the concept of the spectacle, a unified critique of advanced capitalism of which a primary concern was the progressively increasing tendency towards the expression and mediation of social relations through objects. The situationists believed that the shift from individual expression through directly lived experiences, or the first-hand fulfillment of authentic desires, to individual expression by proxy through the exchange or consumption of commodities, or passive second-hand alienation, inflicted significant and far-reaching damage to the quality of human life for both individuals and society. Another important concept of situationist theory was the primary means of counteracting the spectacle; the construction of situations, moments of life deliberately constructed for the purpose of reawakening and pursuing authentic desires, experiencing the feeling of life and adventure, and the liberation of everyday life.

When the Situationist International was first formed, it had a predominantly artistic focus; emphasis was placed on concepts like unitary urbanism and psychogeography. Gradually, however, that focus shifted more towards revolutionary and political theory. The Situationist International reached the apex of its creative output and influence in 1967 and 1968, with the former marking the publication of the two most significant texts of the situationist movement, The Society of the Spectacle by Guy Debord and The Revolution of Everyday Life by Raoul Vaneigem. The expressed writing and political theory of the two aforementioned texts, along with other situationist publications, proved greatly influential in shaping the ideas behind the May 1968 insurrections in France; quotes, phrases, and slogans from situationist texts and publications were ubiquitous on posters and graffiti throughout France during the uprisings."

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195719721989 • advanced capitalism • anti-authoritarianart movement • authentic desires • avant-garde art • Branka Bogdanov • capitalist societycommodity fetishism • commodity spectacle • consumer societyconsumerism • consumption of commodities • Dadadegradationdetournement • directly lived experiences • documentary filmearly 20th centuryeveryday life • exchange of commodities • expression and mediation of social relations through objects • feeling of adventure • feeling of life • first-hand fulfillment of authentic desires • graffiti • Greil Marcus • Guy Debord • individual expression by proxy • Jamie Reid • liberation of everyday life • Malcolm Mac Laren • Marxism • Marxist concepts • Marxist theory • May 1968 • means of production • mid-20th century advanced capitalism • mode of production • moments of life • political theorists • political theorypsychogeography • Raoul Vaneigem • reawakening • revolutionary theory • second-hand alienation • Situationist International • situationist movement • situationist theory • situations • slogan • social alienation • social dysfunction • social relations • social revolutionaries • Society of the Spectacle (Guy Debord)spectaclesurrealism • The Revolution of Everyday Life (1967) • theory of alienation • Thomas Levine • UbuWeb • unified critique • unitary urbanism • video documentary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 FEBRUARY 2017

Silent-era avant-garde artist-filmmakers disrupting the new realities of mass media (rather than replicating them)

"Around the time Shub started her documentary experiments, 20th century avant-garde artists likewise began using repurposed chunks of mass-produced ephemera. Picasso and Braque threw bits of newspaper into paintings; Max Ernst cut up Victorian illustrations to create proto-surrealist collages; Walter Benjamin, T. S. Eliot, and James Joyce pushed the literary practice of quotation into the realm of pastiche; Marcel Duchamp pioneered sculptural assemblage with his readymades; and photomontage blossomed in the graphic works of John Heartfield, Hannah Höch, and Alexander Rodchenko. These works rearranged reality to suit their artists' purposes but, unlike the compilation films, did not try to hide that manipulation. Whether Cubist, Dada, or Constructivist, these artists chose to disrupt the new realities of mass media rather than replicate them, savoring the illogic of dreamlike disjunctions and precipitating new ways to see all-too-common images."

(Ed Halter, 10 July 2008, Moving Image Source)

TAGS

20th centuryAlexander Rodchenkoavant-garde artistsavant-garde cinemaconstructivistcubismcut-up techniqueDadadisruptiondocumentary experiments • dreamlike disjunctions • Ed Halter • Esther Shub • experimental film • found-footage • Georges Braque • Hannah Hochinfluential artistsJames JoyceJohn Heartfield • literary practice • Marcel Duchampmass media • mass-produced ephemera • Max Ernst • new realities • Pablo Picassopastichephotomontagepioneering filmmaker • proto-surrealist collages • quotationreadymade • repurposed archival material • Russian constructivism • sculptural assemblage • Thomas Stearns Eliot • Victorian illustrations • Walter Benjamin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 DECEMBER 2016

Un Chien Andalou: the surrealist masterpiece restored and corrected

"The film as shown here plays in 'actual time', slowing down the hyper, 16 minutes cut to a more deliberately paced 21+ minutes. The image is less contrast-blown than any version I have seen, not to mention that it is no longer heavily cropped. The score, too, is different, dropping the now iconic tango back-and-forth with Wagner, with just a straight run through the Wagner."

(Blake Williams, 22 February 2011)

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1929 • Albert Duverger • black and white • Blake Williams • Fano Messan • film restoration • Filmoteca Espanola • hermaphrodite • influential works • Jaume Miravitlles • Jimmy Berliet • Luis Bunuel • Marval • masterpiecemasterwork • Original Aspect Ratio (OAR) • Pierre Batcheff • Pierre Schild • restorationRobert Hommetsilent cinemasilent filmSimone Mareuilsurrealist cinema • surrealist masterpiece • Un Chien Andalou (1929)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 MARCH 2016

Milos Rajkovic: Skinner Box Head

"Rajkovic creates animated portraits of anonymous archetypes with deconstructed heads and symbolic components that operate like finely tuned machines. Everything is fair game: a religious figure with alter, candles, and a rotating luxury car; U.S. military figures with weight-lifting Ronald McDonald, skeletons, praying hands, and a flat screen TV playing 24-hour cable news.

The brains of these figures are compromised–sometimes portrayed as dropping into a pool of blood or being picked at by a vulture-like bald eagle–so comprised possibly that they are missing the capacity for human empathy. Are they all portraits of psychopaths perhaps? I'm guessing that Milos' answer might be affirmative—these are the psychopaths who run your government, military, religious and corporate institutions."

(Chris McDonnell, 31 December 2013, Cartoon Brew)

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2013 • animal behaviour • animated portrait • birdbizarre imagerybizarre machines • Burrhus Frederic Skinner • Cartoon Brew • deconstructed heads • facefantastical worlds • finely tuned machines • grotesquehuman head • Milos Rajkovic • miniature machines • mutant science • operant conditioning chamber • physiology • Serbian artist • Skinner box • speculative biology • surreal imaginings

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JULY 2015

Pinscreen animation Mindscape by Jacques Drouin

"A particularly creative example of the pinscreen animation technique, this film is about an artist who steps inside his painting and wanders about in a landscape peopled with symbols that trigger unexpected associations. Film without words."

"Mindscape" by Jacques Drouin, 1976, 7mins 31s.

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1976animated short filmanimation techniqueblack and whiteboundary-crossing • crossing over • dreamlike storytelling • grey • in the mind • Jacques Drouin • landscape painting • Le paysagiste (1976) • meta-painting • Mindscape (1976) • movable pins • National Film Board of Canadapaint our own surroundingspainted world • picture within a picture • pinscreen animation technique • reality and illusion • shades of grey • stepping out of the framesurrealistic • surrealistic imagery • symbolic meaning • textural effects • without dialogue • wordless

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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