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Which clippings match Simon Perkins' concept of 'Prototyping' pg.1 of 9
14 SEPTEMBER 2015

Design for Action: designing the immaterial artefact

"Throughout most of history, design was a process applied to physical objects. Raymond Loewy designed trains. Frank Lloyd Wright designed houses. Charles Eames designed furniture. Coco Chanel designed haute couture. Paul Rand designed logos. David Kelley designed products, including (most famously) the mouse for the Apple computer.

But as it became clear that smart, effective design was behind the success of many commercial goods, companies began employing it in more and more contexts. High-tech firms that hired designers to work on hardware (to, say, come up with the shape and layout of a smartphone) began asking them to create the look and feel of user-interface software. Then designers were asked to help improve user experiences. Soon firms were treating corporate strategy making as an exercise in design. Today design is even applied to helping multiple stakeholders and organizations work better as a system.

This is the classic path of intellectual progress. Each design process is more complicated and sophisticated than the one before it. Each was enabled by learning from the preceding stage. Designers could easily turn their minds to graphical user interfaces for software because they had experience designing the hardware on which the applications would run. Having crafted better experiences for computer users, designers could readily take on nondigital experiences, like patients' hospital visits. And once they learned how to redesign the user experience in a single organization, they were more prepared to tackle the holistic experience in a system of organizations."

(Tim Brown and Roger Martin, 2015, Harvard Business Review)

A version of this article appeared in the September 2015 issue (pp.56–64) of Harvard Business Review.

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Bill BuxtonCharles EamesCoco Chanelcomplex systems • David Kelley • design history • design intervention • design processdesign thinking • design-oriented approach • design-oriented thinkingdesigned artefactethnographic design approachFrank Lloyd Wright • genuinely innovative strategies • graphical user interfaceHarvard Business ReviewHerbert Simon • holistic user experience • IDEOimmateriality • intervention design • iPoditerative prototyping • iterative rapid-cycle prototyping • iTunes Store • Jeff Hawkins • look and feellow-fidelity prototype • low-resolution prototype • nondigital experiences • PalmPilot • Paul Randpersonal digital assistantphysical objectsrapid prototyping • Raymond Loewy • redesignRichard Buchananrole of the designerservice designuser experienceuser experience designuser feedbackuser interface designwicked problems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2014

Protofarm 2050: guide to free farming (urban agricultural speculation)

"Design Indaba invited five designers to look beyond the possibilities and predictions currently in the public domain. Futurefarmers, 5.5 designers, Dunne&Raby, Revital Cohen and Frank Tjepkema each created a unique vision of the year 2050 with increased urbanisation and population, limited natural resources, climate challenges and digital–biological integration. Defining farming as the sustainable cultivation of a renewable resource, Design Indaba presented Protofarm 2050 at the ICSID World Design Congress in Singapore from 23 to 25 November [2009]."

(Design Indaba)

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20092050 • 5.5 designers • agricultural futures • agricultureAnthony Dunne • Anthony Lebosse • bookletcamouflage • Cape Town Design Festival • Claire Renard • climate challenges • climate change • dandelion • dark humour • Design Indaba • designers • digital-biological integration • Dunne and Raby • edible fauna • edible flora • ethical consumptionfarmingFiona Rabyfishingflora and faunafood • food design • food gathering activitiesfood security • food system • Frank Tjepkema • fruit • Futurefarmers (artist collective) • gleaning • hunting and gathering tactics • ICSID World Design Congress • Jean-Sebastien Blanc • leftovers • limited natural resources • meat consumption • Paris • pate • pigeon • poodlepopulation growth • Protofarm 2050 • prototype tools • rat • renewable resource • Revital Cohen • Seine • Singaporesite-specific interventionsSouth Africa • speculative approaches • speculative designspeculative proposals • speculative scenarios • speculative urbanism • starlingssustainabilitysustainable consumption • sustainable cultivation • tactical behaviourtactics • urban food • urbanisation • Vincent Baranger

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2014

AppSeed: interactive prototypes from pen and paper sketches

"AppSeed lets you take your sketches and make them into functioning prototypes, bridging the gap between pen/paper and digital, through computer vision. It allows you to sketch your designs as you normally would and then manipulate your sketches directly on your phone. Unlike similar products, the use of computer vision speeds up the process and understands your sketches. AppSeed can identify an enclosed space in your sketch, allowing you to make it into a button, input text, map, or another UI element. Making your sketch into a functioning prototype running on your phone."

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2013app • app prototyping • AppSeed (app) • design options • drawn shapes • functional prototype • Greg Goralski • hand-drawnideas start on paperinteractive elements • interactive paper prototype • interactive prototypes • interface designlook and feel • look and feel options • mock-up • Open Source Computer Vision • OpenCVpaper prototypingpattern recognitionproduct prototype • prototyping app • sketching ideastest prototypeTorontoUI design • UI element • UI elements • user interface designUXvisual screen design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2013

Kano: A computer anyone can make by Kano

"A computer and coding kit for all ages, all over the world. Simple as Lego, powered by Pi. Make games, learn code, create the future."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2013

DesFi (Design Fictions) MA study at QUT

"I use the term 'DesFi' as a play on 'SciFi'. In that 'SciFi' narratives and visualisations are fictional scenarios based on scientific discoveries and discussions. Im particularly interested in how the genre of 'science fiction' can provide an example approach for design students to consider when they are conceptualising potential designs for future contexts.

The DesFi approach allows design students to put aside existing limitations… such as current issues around voice recognition, language translators or even access to personal data. These limitations are based in technical, political and sometimes ethical arguments that, although undeniably critical to design feasibility, can suspend design innovations if we only consider the policies, technologies and processes that exist right now.

My premise to the students is that such contemporary concerns may be solved by another discipline in the near or far future. Consequently, attitudes will shift, new technologies will emerge and the criteria and inventory for design specifications will change.

Limiting our design ideas to current issues may dilute the potential for innovation… but more importantly, by prototyping great imaginative design solutions, we can increase the demand for change through demonstrating the possibilities that emerge from overcoming the conditions and contingencies of designing products for only todays market and todays user."

(Deb Polson, 25 November 2013)

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2009AustraliaBruce Sterlingcommunication design education • contemporary concerns • Debra Polson • DesFi • DesFi prototypes • DesFi tangents • design educators • design feasibility • design fictions • Design Fictions (course) • design innovation • design specifications • design students • design studio programme • designing products • designing prototypes • diegetic prototypes • ethical arguments • fantasticfictional scenariosfuture contextshistory of ideasimaginative design solutions • Interactive and Visual Design Course • Julian BleeckerMA • Masters of Creative Industries • near future design • new technologies • potential designs • prototypingQUTsci-fiscience fictionscientific discoveriesscientific observationsspeculative designsuspend disbeliefwhat if

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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