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Which clippings match Simon Perkins' concept of 'Games Research' pg.1 of 3
19 JANUARY 2016

Skins: Designing Games with First Nations Youth

"Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), based out of Obx Labs at Concordia University in Montreal and directed by Lewis and Skawennati Fragnito, is a network of academics, artists, and technologists that encourages Indigenous participation in online culture and exploration of new media technology. The main objective of the AbTeC research network is to discover, define, and implement methods by which Indigenous people can use networked communication technology to strengthen our cultures. In an effort to overcome the economic, social, and cultural factors that influence the low rate of Indigenous participation in the making of new media and encourage Indigenous representation in digital games and virtual worlds specifically, AbTeC proposed to conduct Skins, a game/virtual world development workshop for Aboriginal youth that teaches them design programming, art, animation, and audio. ...

In conducting Skins, our goal is to encourage First Nations youth to be more than consumers of digital media; rather, we wish to show them how they themselves can be creators who can approach games with a critical perspective and from within their own cultural context. We are motivated by the possibilities of digital games and virtual environments for Indigenous peoples as well as correcting or adding to representations of Indigenous peoples in commercial games. Indigenous peoples' survival, recovery, development, and self-determination hinges on the preservation and revitalization of languages, social and spiritual practices, social relations, and arts [1]. Digital games and virtual environments, with their unique combination of story, design, code, architecture, art, animation, and sound [2], provide a rich medium though which to explore different strategies for pursuing such preservation and revitalization. For example, Thornton Media's RezWorld is a virtual environment for learning the Cherokee language. It has even been argued that the fluid, open, and networked characteristics of modern digital media make it particularly useful as a tool for Aboriginal storytelling, with Loretta Todd, Cree/Métis filmmaker and Director of the Aboriginal Media Arts Lab, suggesting 'the experience of cyberspace offers the reversal of narrative as derived from storytelling, a return to oral tradition' [3]. Furthermore, due to the radical decrease in the costs of the means of production and distribution, digital games and virtual worlds present Indigenous people with a powerful opportunity to widely (or narrowly) communicate stories in which we shape our own representation."

(Beth Aileen Lameman and Jason Edward Lewis, 2011)

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2011Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal Media Arts Lab • Aboriginal storytelling • Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC) • Aboriginal youth • Bart Simon • Beth Aileen Lameman • CanadaCelia Pearce • Cherokee language • Christian Beauclair • community participatory project • Concordia University • Cree • cultural representations • development workshop • digital games • digital media and learning • Dogrib • First NationsFirst Nations youth • Haudenosaunee • Indigenous cultural production • Indigenous participation • Indigenous peopleindigenous peoples • Indigenous representation in digital games • Indigenous representation in virtual worlds • Iroquois • Jason Edward Lewis • Journal of Game Design and Development Education • Katherine Isbister • Ken Finney • language preservation • Loretta Todd • Louise Profeit • making new media • Metis • Mohawk • Montreal • more than consumers • Myron Lameman • Nacho Nyak Dun • Nehiraw • new media artist • new media technologiesNorth American • Obx Labs at Concordia University • oral traditionresearch network • revitalisation of languages • RezWorld • Richard Van Camp • self-determination • Skawennati Fragnito • spiritual practices • Steve Loft • Steve Sanderson • Thornton Media • traditional culturevideo game designvideo games and Indigenous peoplevirtual environmentsvirtual worlds

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2016

Korean video gamers tend to play collectively (not individually)

"Indigenous video game culture creates a game space that Korean gamers use to construct their digital national identity. To Korean gamers, the concept of a digital Korea represents an imaginary space of Korean community where people play games together. Unlike gamers in the United States and Japan, whose gaming experience tends to be individualized, Korea's indigenous video game culture represents a new form of youth culture that allows young gamers to engage in social interaction through gaming with friends at PC Bangs. In this culture, entertainment happens at the moment when gamers are able to 'shout and play games together.' [29] This experience of social gaming creates a particular taste of gameplay that also leads to further immersion in a gaming narrative particular to most Korean gamers (Ok 2011). It is said that Korea is a mad gaming nation (Ahonen and O'Reilly 2007), and the country has the highest penetration rate for a single online game; 12 million South Koreans have driven a car in the Nexon online game Crazyracing Kartrider (2004). In addition to social gameplay within the Korean community, nation-building sentiments also arise in the context of Korean player-killing, where Korean gamers engage in social gaming on the international servers of an online game. [30] Thomas (2008) describes such gameplay as a cultural location that reflects existing racial tensions between Korean and American gamers. Similarly, political tension also appeared in a game massacre event, when Chinese gamers hacked into a Korean server and sparked mass killing between Chinese and Korean gamers in Legend of Mir II (2001).

On a macro level, gaming as a national pastime can be seen in the rapid spread of e-sports in all aspects of Korean society, and this e-sport culture is an indigenous gaming culture that receives support from the government, media institutions, and passionate gamers. E-sports have become recognized as an international sports phenomenon with their origins in Korea. With their emphasis on professional gamers, they have also become an emerging new media phenomenon, an international spectacle in video games (Jin 2010)."

(Mark J. P. Wolf, p.509)

Wolf, M. J. P. (2015). "Video Games Around the World", The MIT Press.

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2015 • Chinese gamer • collective behaviourcollectivism • Crazyracing Kartrider • cultural location • digital national identity • e-sport culture • e-sports • game massacre event • gameplaygames research • gaming experience • gaming narrative • gaming nation • Hye Ryoung Ok • imaginary spacesimmersion • indigenous gaming culture • indigenous video game culture • international sports phenomenon • Jim OReilly • Korean community • Korean gamer • Korean society • LAN gaming • Legend of Mir 2 • Mark Wolf • mass collaboration • mass killing • multiplayer computer games • nation-building • national pastime • new media phenomenon • PC bang • people play games together • play games together • political tension • professional gamer • racial tensions • shared context • social gameplay • social gaming • social interaction • social interaction through gaming • South Korea • Tomi Ahonen • video game culture • youth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2016

Love Punks: online game created by Australian Indigenous kids

"The Love Punks online game was created by a gang of 9,10 and 11 year old Love Punks from Roebourne in WA. For the last 8 months the Love Punks have been sweating it out, in 40 degree heat, on computers creating stop motion animations of themselves and friends in photoshop and flash."

(26 April 2012)

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2012 • 9-11 year olds • Aboriginal Australian kids • Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal kids • Adobe Flash • bearded dragon • Big hART • Burrup Peninsula • childhood imagination • Chynna Campbell • comic bookcommunity participatory projectcreative participationdesert • designers of the future • disadvantaged communitiesDIY • Duncan Gates • First Nations youthfroggame designgreen screenhomemade gamesimagineeringIndigenous Australiansindigenous community • indigenous games and play • Indigenous people • Indigenous young people • interactive comic • kids • lizard • Lovepunks Game • mining • mud flats • Murujuga • NEOMAD • online game • outdoor game • peacockpersonal empowerment • Pilbara desert • pogona • remote communities • Roebourne • salt flats • Satellite Sisters • sea • social arts • stop motion animationstop-frame animation • Stu Campbell • Telen Rodwell • Trevor Jamieson • video gamevideo games and Indigenous peopleWestern Australia • Woodside (natural gas company) • Yijala Yala Project • young designersyoung peoplezombie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JUNE 2015

A Game of One's Own: Towards a New Gendered Poetics of Digital Space

"In the opening pages of her classic essay, A Room of Ones Own, Virginia Woolf describes being blocked from entering the 'turf' of the University in Oxbridge by an administrative gate-keeper.

Instantly a man's figure rose to intercept me. … His face expressed horror and indignation. Instinct rather than reason came to my help, he was a Beadle; I was a woman. This was the turf; there was the path. Only the Fellows and Scholars are allowed here; the gravel is the place for me' (Woolf, 1929).

This scene invokes the ways in which women have been systematically barred from the digital playground, both as players and as creators of play space. To a large extent, the video game industry in the U.S. remains dominated by a boys-only ethos that harkens back to the gender-biased practices in the British academia of Woolf's day.[1] Games that are female-friendly are often couched in derogatory or dismissive terms: The Sims (Maxis, 2000) is 'not really a game'; casual games are not counted as 'real' games by many in the industry.[2] The result is that certain types of games, game mechanics, play patterns, and, as we'll see, particular types of game spaces have tended to dominate the field of games.

Although this paper discusses the ways in which digital game spaces have been strongly gendered towards male constructions of space and play, this does not necessarily mean we advocate creating exclusively female (or 'pink') games. As Woolf points out in her essay, the solution is not simply to create a distinctly feminine voice (although this is one potential angle of approach), but rather to promote the cultivation of an 'androgynous mind', which, she suggests, is already possessed by male authors of great note throughout history (she cites Shakespeare as an example). We propose drawing from a number of cultural practices, literary sources, and existing games in order to pave the way for a playground that is more open to female players. Thus we promote not only the definition of new feminine game spaces, but also encourage designers to think in terms of 'androgynous space' that engages all aspects of all persons: a space into which women and girls are invited and welcomed, but in which men and boys can also enjoy more diverse and nuanced forms of play than are typically available to them."

(Tracy Fullerton, Jacquelyn Ford Morie and Celia Pearce, "A Game of One's Own: Towards a New Gendered Poetics of Digital Space", The Fibreculture Journal : 11)

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2008 • A Room of Ones Own (1929) • androgynous mind • androgynous space • boys-only ethos • British academia • casual gamesCelia Pearce • concepts of space • contested spaces • cultural practices • dangerous spaces • digital game spaces • digital playgrounddigital spacedolls house • domestic spaces • emotional space • enchanted worlds • female games • female players • female-friendly spaces • feminine conceptions of space • feminine game spaces • feminine voiceFibreculture Journal • game design as cultural practice • game mechanic • game spaces • games industrygames research • gender-biased practices • gendered spaces • gendered technology • gendered voices • gendering game space • Jacquelyn Ford Morie • male authors • male constructions of play • male constructions of space • MMOG • narrative spaces • nuanced forms of play • Oxbridge • pink games • play patterns • play spaces • poetics of digital space • procedural space • real games • regendered play space • regendering game space • secret places • social spacesThe Sims (2000) • Tracy Fullerton • video games industryVirginia Woolfvirtual spacesWilliam Shakespeare • women and games

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 NOVEMBER 2014

Never Alone: Could a Video Game Help to Preserve Inuit Culture?

"'Kunuuksaayuka,' an Iñupiaq tale that was recounted by the late Iñupiaq storyteller Robert Nasruk Cleveland. In its traditional incarnation, the tale recounts the adventures of a boy – the product of a nomadic society – who goes on a quest to save his community from an apocalyptic blizzard. After securing the consent of Cleveland’s daughter, Minnie Aliitchask Gray, the development team in conjunction with representatives from the Iñupiat community reworked the story until they settled on a script that would become the basis for 'Never Alone.' (The game’s Iñupiaq sub-title, 'Kisima Ingitchuna,' translates to 'I am Not Alone.')".

(Simon Parkin, 17 November 2014, The New Yorker)

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2014adventure gameAlaskaAlaska Native peoplearctic circle • arctic fox • atmospheric presence • aurora borealis • backstory • Black River People • blizzard • call on spirits • coldcompanion charactercontemporary interpretation • Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) • cultural heritage • cultural insights • cultural myths • cultural traditions • cultural translation • digital storytelling • E-Line Media • endless blizzard • engaged learning • environment as antagonistfemale protagonist • folkloric fantasy characters • folktale • foxindie gamesIndigenous peopleinteractive playInuit • Inupiaq • Kisima Ingitchuna (video game) • Kunuuksaayuka • magical bola • Minnie Gray • native tribes • Never Alone (video game) • nomadic cultures • nomadic people • Nuna (character) • oral traditionpuzzle platformer • Robert Nasruk Cleveland • Sean Vesce • spiritsSteamsurvival storyThe New Yorker • traditional art • treacherous landscape • Upper One Games • video gamevideo games and Indigenous peoplewind

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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