Not Signed-In
Which clippings match Aaron Walawalkar's concept of 'International Relations' pg.2 of 38
22 SEPTEMBER 2016

Examples of parody video remixes using omission

Bush: 2004 State of the Union Remix; Obama State Of The Union remix; OBAMA State of the Union Address 2014 - (PARODY); Palin's Breath; Donald Trump's sniffling and heavy breathing; David Cameron's Conservative Party Conference Speech 2012 [Disrupted]; Nigel Farage and Independence day SPOOF!; Cassetteboy vs The News; Cassetteboy vs The Bloody Apprentice; Jeremy Corbyn's nuclear u-turn and David Cameron's approach to poverty | Cassetteboy remix the news; The Queen responds to Brexit | BREAKING.

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200420122014Alan SugarBarack Obama • Boris Johnson • Brexit • Buckingham Palace • Cassetteboy • cleaner • conference speech • Conservative partyDavid CamerondisruptionDonald TrumpEuropean UnionGeorge W Bush • heavy breathing • hyperbole • Independence Day (1996) • Jeremy CorbynLiberal DemocratMichael GoveNigel Farage • nuclear proliferation • omissionparodyparody rebootparody versionparody video remixesplaying against type • political meltdown • povertyPrince Charles • Queen Elizabeth II • reboot • referendum • remixesrepurposing • Sarah Palin • sniff • sniffing • sniffle • spoofState of the Union • taken out of context • The Apprentice (UK TV series)tv news • u-turn • UK EU membership referendum • UKIP • upstagingvacuum cleanervideo compositingvideo remixvs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JUNE 2016

Digital Sociology: Beyond the Digital to the Sociological

"Where sociologists differ from many other social researchers in researching digital media is their awareness that digital data, like any other type of data, are socially created and have a social life, a vitality, of their own. They are not the neutral products of automatic calculation, but represent deliberate decisions by those who formulate the computer algorithms that collect and manipulate these data (boyd and Crawford 2012; Cheney-Lippold 2011; Ruppert et al. 2013). The data that these devices and software produce structure our concepts of identity, embodiment, relationships, our choices and preferences and even our access to services or spaces. Without the knowledge of digital technology users, algorithms measure and sort them, deciding what choices they may be offered (Beer 2009, 2013a). Algorithms and other elements of software, therefore, are generative, a productive form of power (Lash 2007)."

(Deborah Lupton, 2013, p.4)

Deborah Lupton 'Digital Sociology: Beyond the Digital to the Sociological', Paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association 2013 Conference, Monash University, 27 November 2013.

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2013 • algorithms • cultural concept of technologycultural practicescultural technologycultural understanding of technologyculture and societyDanah Boyd • David Beer • Deborah Lupton • digital data • digital media • digital sociology • digital technologyembodiment • Evelyn Ruppert • identity • John Cheney-Lippold • Kate Crawford • material culturemediated interactionMonash Universitynew mediaScott Lashsocial mediasocial policysocial researchsocial theorysociology • sociomateriality • software affordancestechnology practicesUniversity of Sydney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 FEBRUARY 2016

Universal resilience patterns in complex networks

"Resilience, a system's ability to adjust its activity to retain its basic functionality when errors, failures and environmental changes occur, is a defining property of many complex systems. Despite widespread consequences for human health, the economy and the environment, events leading to loss of resilience—from cascading failures in technological systems to mass extinctions in ecological networks—are rarely predictable and are often irreversible. These limitations are rooted in a theoretical gap: the current analytical framework of resilience is designed to treat low-dimensional models with a few interacting components, and is unsuitable for multi-dimensional systems consisting of a large number of components that interact through a complex network. Here we bridge this theoretical gap by developing a set of analytical tools with which to identify the natural control and state parameters of a multi-dimensional complex system, helping us derive effective one-dimensional dynamics that accurately predict the system's resilience. The proposed analytical framework allows us systematically to separate the roles of the system's dynamics and topology, collapsing the behaviour of different networks onto a single universal resilience function. The analytical results unveil the network characteristics that can enhance or diminish resilience, offering ways to prevent the collapse of ecological, biological or economic systems, and guiding the design of technological systems resilient to both internal failures and environmental changes."

(Jianxi Gao, Baruch Barzel & Albert-László Barabási, 17 February 2016, Nature)

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2016Albert-Laszlo Barabasi • Baruch Barzel • biological systems • cascading failure • Cognitive Visualization Lab • complex networkscomplex systems • critical phenomena • data visualisationdroughtecological balance • ecological networks • ecological sustainability • ecological systems • ecosystemenvironmental changeenvironmental statisticsextinctionglobal issuesIBM • IBM Watson • interrelationships • irreversible change • Jianxi Gao • loss of resilience • Mauro Martino • multidimensional systems • network dynamics • network earth • network ecologynetwork model • network relationships • networked interaction • nonlinear phenomena • Northeastern University • one-dimensional dynamics • phase transitions • resiliencespeciationsustainability • system collapse • technological systems • universal resilience function • universal resilience patterns • visual explanations • visual representation graphicallyvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualising data • wildfire

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JANUARY 2016

Humanities aren't a science. Stop treating them like one.

"I don't mean to pick on this single paper. It's simply a timely illustration of a far deeper trend, a tendency that is strong in almost all humanities and social sciences, from literature to psychology, history to political science. Every softer discipline these days seems to feel inadequate unless it becomes harder, more quantifiable, more scientific, more precise. That, it seems, would confer some sort of missing legitimacy in our computerized, digitized, number-happy world. But does it really? Or is it actually undermining the very heart of each discipline that falls into the trap of data, numbers, statistics, and charts? Because here's the truth: most of these disciplines aren't quantifiable, scientific, or precise. They are messy and complicated. And when you try to straighten out the tangle, you may find that you lose far more than you gain.

It's one of the things that irked me about political science and that irks me about psychology—the reliance, insistence, even, on increasingly fancy statistics and data sets to prove any given point, whether it lends itself to that kind of proof or not."

(Maria Konnikova, 10 August 2012, Scientific American)

Bruce McLean, "Pose Work for Plinths 3", 1971, 12 photographs, black and white, on paper on board, 75 x 68 cm (Tate).

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appropriately complex representation • attempts to quantify the qualitative • Carol Tavris • easy empiricism • erroneous • error in reasoning • fallacious arguments • faulty reasoning • generalisable simplicity • hard science • Herbert Gintis • humanities • ignorance • imperative of generalisable simplicityimperative of proof • irreducible elements • Isaac Asimov • Italo Calvino • Jerome Kagan • Maria Konnikova • metricisation • nonsense • over-reliance on empirical methods • over-reliance on science • overly reductive • perils of reductionism • post hoc explanations • post hoc hypotheses • pseudoscience • psychohistorical trends • psychology • qualitative phenomena • quantifiable certainty • quantification • quantitative analysis • reduced to scientific explanation • reductionist perspective • Richard Polt • Scientific American (magazine) • scientific-seeming approaches • scientification • scientism • unquantifiable • unsound judgement

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 OCTOBER 2015

Hans Rosling: Don't Panic - The Truth About Population

"'Don't Panic' is a one-hour long documentary produced by Wingspan Productions and broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

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2013BangladeshBBC2birth and deathchanging worldchild mortalitycountry and comparative datadata visualisationdebunkingdemographicsdeveloping countriesdifferent strata of society • Dollar Street • economic developmentenvironmental determinismenvironmental statistics • extreme poverty • family planning • Gapmindergender equalityglobal population • global portrait • Hans Roslinghuman history • human mortality • ignorance survey • Indiainfographics • life expectancy • mortalityour planetPeoples Republic of Chinapopulation change • population explosion • population growthpopulation statisticspovertypreconceptionsmall data • social development • social inequalitystatistical graphicsstatistician • street metaphor • sustainable global development • television documentary • understanding statistics • United Nationsvisualising data • Wingspan Productions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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