Not Signed-In
Which clippings match Aaron Walawalkar's concept of 'Emancipation' pg.1 of 26
17 NOVEMBER 2016

When Nigel Farage met Donald Trump

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2016Brexit • childish • Donald Trumpface swaphead replacementhumour • Hunter Tirpak • informal alliance • mash-upNigel FarageparodyPennsylvaniapolitician caricaturepower relationspuppetRepublicanrepurposingright-wingsatirical illustration • Tiny Farage • Tiny Trump • UK EU membership referendumvideo compositingVladimir Putin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2016

Rap & Hip-Hop was born in 1973 at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue

"Hip-hop music is generally considered to have been pioneered in New York's South Bronx in 1973 by Jamaican-born Kool DJ Herc. At a Halloween dance party thrown by his younger sister, Herc used an innovative turntable technique to stretch a song's drum break by playing the break portion of two identical records consecutively. The popularity of the extended break lent its name to 'breakdancing'--a style specific to hip-hop culture, which was facilitated by extended drumbreaks played by DJs at New York dance parties. By the mid-1970s, New York's hip-hop scene was dominated by seminal turntablists DJ Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, and Herc. The rappers of Sugarhill Gang produced hip-hop's first commercially successful hit, 'Rapper's Delight,' in 1979'.

Rap itself--the rhymes spoken over hip-hop music--began as a commentary on the ability--or 'skillz'--of a particular DJ while that DJ was playing records at a hip-hop event. MCs, the forerunners of today's rap artists, introduced DJs and their songs and often recognized the presence of friends in the audience at hip-hop performances. Their role was carved out by popular African-American radio disc jockeys in New York during the latel96Os, who introduced songs and artists with spontaneous rhymes. The innovation of MCs caught the attention of hip-hop fans. Their rhymes lapped over from the transition period between the end of one song and the introduction of the next to the songs themselves. Their commentaries moved solely from a DJ's skillz to their own personal experiences and stories. The role of MCs in performances rose steadily, and they began to be recognized as artists in their own right [2].

The local popularity of the rhythmic music served by DJs at dance parties and clubs, combined with an increase in 'b-boys'--breakdancers--and graffiti artists and the growing importance of MCs, created a distinctive culture known as hip-hop. For the most part, hip-hop culture was defined and embraced by young, urban, working-class African-Americans. Hip-hop music originated from a combination of traditionally African-American forms of music--including jazz, soul, gospel, and reggae. It was created by working-class African-Americans, who, like Herc, took advantage of available tools--vinyl records and turntables--to invent a new form of music that both expressed and shaped the culture of black New York City youth in the 1970s."

(Becky Blanchard, 1999)

2). Information on MCs drawn from the University of Maryland's "Mcing: The Past" and "MCing: The Present" in "A Brief History of Hip-Hop Culture"

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1970s1973African AmericanAfrika Bambaataaappropriation • b-boys • b-girls • Becky Blanchard • black culture • block party • break dancing • breakbeat • breakdance • breakdancing • Cindy Campbell • civil rights movement • Clive Campbell • cultural expression • dance party • DJ • DJ Grandmaster Flash • DJing • extended break • gospel • graffiti art • graffiti artists • Grandmaster Flash • hip-hophip-hop backbeat • hip-hop culture • hip-hop music • hip-hop performance • hip-hop scene • jazz • Kool DJ Herc • l960s • MC • MCing • music history • musical form • New York City • radio disc jockey • rap • rap artist • rap music • rapperreggae • rhyme • rhythmic music • Sedgwick Avenue • skillz • soul • South Bronx • spoken word • Sugarhill Gang • turntable • turntable technique • turntablist • vinyl record • West Bronx • working classworking class cultureyouth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 OCTOBER 2016

HyperNormalisation: our retreat into a simplified version of the world

"The documentary is inspired by the unpredictable events of recent times – from the rise of Donald Trump to Brexit, the war in Syria, the endless migrant crisis, and random bomb attacks. It seeks to explain both why these chaotic events are happening, and why we and our leaders can't understand them. Curtis's theory is that Westerners - politicians, journalists, experts and members of the public alike - have retreated into a simplified, and often completely fake version of the world. But because it is all-encompassing, we accept it as normal.

HyperNormalisation explores this hollow world by looking back at 40 years of events, and profiling a diverse cast of characters such as: the Assad dynasty, Donald Trump, Henry Kissinger, Patti Smith, the early performance artists in New York, President Putin, intelligent machines, Japanese gangsters and suicide bombers."

(Holly Barrett, 22nd September 2016, Royal Television Society)

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20169/11 • Acid Phreak (pseudonym) • Adam CurtisAfghanistan • AirBnB • Alexei Yurchak • Anthony GiddensArab Spring • Arkady Strugatsky • BBC documentary • BBC iPlayer • Boris Strugatsky • Brexit • British filmmaker • British National Front • Carl Rogers • cartoon villain • chaos • chaotic events • chatbot • civil rights movement • Corrupt (pseudonym) • cyber activism • cyberspace • Damascus • David Frost • Declaration of Independence in Cyberspace • delusion • digital rightsdisruptive innovationdocumentaryDonald Trump • Eli Ladopoulos • ELIZA (natural language processing) • fakeness • functioning society • Gulf War • HAC (pseudonym) • Hafez al-Assad • Henry Kissinger • hippies • hypernormalisation • HyperNormalisation (2016) • intelligent machines • internet utopianismIraq • John Barlow • John Lee • Joseph Weizenbaum • Judea Pearl • Julio Fernandez • late communist period • Lester Coleman • liability theory • Lionel Ritchie • machine fetishisation • Mark Abene • Martha Rosler • Masters of Deception (MOD) • migrant crisis • Muammar Gaddafi • Muslim Brotherhood • New YorkNigel FarageOccupy Wall Street • Outlaw (pseudonym) • paradoxPatti Smith • Paul Stira • performance artists • Phiber Optik (pseudonym) • powerlesspretence • random bomb attacks • retreat into simplified views of the world • Roadside Picnic (1972) • Ronald Reagan • Royal Television Society • Scorpion (pseudonym) • self-absorbed baby boomers • self-fulfilling prophecy • Soviet UnionStalker (1979)suicide bombersSyria • Tahir Square • techno-panic • techno-utopiaterrorism • time of great uncertainty • Timothy LearyTron • Uber • Vladimir PutinVladislav Surkov • War in Syria • Yakuza

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2016

Teagan: an animated short film about gender transition

"A story of transition – from male to female, and from despondency to happiness. Using recorded interview material and representative artwork, this short touches on the fear and loneliness of living in the closet, and the joy and confidence that comes with stepping into the light."

Teagan (2013) - directed by Igor Coric and Sheldon Lieberman.

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2013animated documentaryanimated short filmAustralian short filmbecomingbody politicsBrisbaneconfidence • despondency • empowerment themefeargender • gender dysphoria • gender reassignment • gender transition • happiness • Igor Coric • intersex • into the light • joy • living in the closet • loneliness • looking in the mirror • personal revelationphysical appearancequeer cinema • recorded interview material • Serbian animator • sex change • sex reassignment • Sheldon Lieberman • Teagan (2013) • Teagan Young • transgender

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JANUARY 2016

Why Man Creates: the great (Western) progress narrative

"How unlikely that one of the least definable films from the last half-century would also be one of the most beloved. A favorite of classroom AV diversions, and an abridged presentation on the very first episode of '60 Minutes' helped make it the most viewed educational film of all time. 'I don't know what it all means,' Saul Bass himself admitted, and his 'Why Man Creates' (1968) is far more loose and playful than the rigid thesis its title might imply. In fact, it is the searching and open-ended nature of the various vignettes that perhaps makes the film resonate so strongly with viewers. Though an Oscar®-winner for Documentary Short Subject, the film is almost entirely invented, apart from recollections of old masters like Edison, Hemingway and Einstein, and brief encounters with scientists striving to innovate for the betterment of mankind. Creators invariably encounter problems, and have no choice but to persevere in the face of discouragement. If the film argues anything, it is that the unbridled pursuit of new ideas makes us uniquely human."

(Sean Savage)

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1968Albert Einstein • Alfred Nobel • American Revolution • Ancient Greeceanimated filmArab • birth of civilization • cancer research • cave painting • cavemen • celebrating human achievement • creative inspirationcreativitydark ages • development of writing • dynamite • early humans • Ernest Hemingway • Euclid • Great Pyramids at Giza • Greek achievements • hand-drawn animationhistory of ideashuman civilizationinvention of the wheelinventiveness • James Bonner • Jesse Greenstein • Leonardo da VincilibertyLouis PasteurLudwig van Beethovenman • mathematical discovery • Mayo Simon • Michelangelo • nature of creativity • nature of justice • organised labour • origin of the universe • Paul Saltman • pioneering mathematicsprogress narratives • pursuit of happiness • religion • Renato Dulbecco • Saul Bassscience historyscientific progressThomas EdisonvignetteWestern culture • Why Man Creates (1968) • zero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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