Not Signed-In
Which clippings match Aaron Walawalkar's concept of 'Online Activism' pg.1 of 39
01 SEPTEMBER 2017

Truth In Advertising: Guerrilla Art in Santa Cruz 1980-1985

"The photographs in this exhibit are of actual altered billboards that appeared on the streets of Santa Cruz, California from 1980 to 1985. The photographs have been adjusted for brightness, contrast, and parallax, but no content changes were made.

The billboards were made over by a clandestine network of midnight billboard editors operating under the name of Truth In Advertising, or TIA for short.

This exhibit of their historic work was first presented in 2007 at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History. The exhibit is made up of 12 billboards presented in the order in which they appeared on the streets of Santa Cruz. The sequence also tells the story of Truth in Advertising, and documents publicity and commentary."

(Bob Stayton)

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TAGS

1980sactivismadadvertising billboardsadvertising hijackingappropriation practicesbillboardbillboard bandit • Bob Stayton • critical cultural hijacking • culture jammingdetournement publicitaire • guerrilla art • guerrilla tacticsmedia hijacking • media reinterpretation • re-purposerecombinatory practiceridicule • Santa Cruz • transformative works • Truth in Advertising (TIA) • William Board (pseudonym)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 APRIL 2017

Sonic Outlaws Documentary (1995)

"Sonic Outlaws, a fragmented, gleefully anarchic documentary by Craig Baldwin, approaches this incident from several directions. Some of the film is about the legal nightmare that ensued from Negativland's little joke. In a highly publicized case, U2's label, Island Records, charged Negativland with copyright and trademark infringement for appropriating the letter U and the number 2, even though U2 had in turn borrowed its name from the Central Intelligence Agency. SST then dropped Negativland, suppressed the record and demanded that the group pay legal fees. Trying to remain solvent, Negativland sent out a barrage of letters and legal documents that are now collected in 'Fair Use', an exhaustive, weirdly fascinating scrapbook about the case.

Sonic Outlaws covers some of the same territory while also expanding upon the ideas behind Negativland's guerilla recording tactics. Guerilla is indeed the word, since these and other appropriation artists see themselves as engaged in real warfare, inundated by the commercial airwaves, infuriated by the propaganda content of much of what they hear and see, these artists strike back by rearranging contexts as irreverently as possible. Their technological capabilities are awesome enough to mean no sound or image is tamper-proof today."

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1995 • Alan Korn • anarchic documentary • appropriation art • appropriation artist • audio collage • Bill Daniel • billboard bandit • bone-dry educational film • Casey Kasem • cellular phone scanner • Chris Grigg • commercial airwaves • copyright infringement • Craig Baldwin • cultural criticismculture jamming • David Wills • documentary collage • Don Joyce • Doug Kahnfair usefound footage • guerilla recording tactics • guerrilla tactics • independent rock band • John Heck • John Oswald • Josh Pearson • Linda Morgan Brown • Lloyd Dunn • Lone Ranger • Mark Hosler • media jammer • media piracy • media recontextualisation • multimedia plagiarism • music samplingNegativland • noise maker • Paul Neff • pirated audiotape • public information film • Public Works Productions • Ralph Johnson • recontextualisation • Richard Lyons • Roger CormanRonald Reagan • sample based artist • sampled music • satirical samplings • Silly Putty • sly commentary • Sonic Outlaws Documentary (1995) • stealing ideas • subversive fun • tape music • Tape-Beatles • trademark infringement • U-2 spy plane • U2 (band) • video collage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 OCTOBER 2016

HyperNormalisation: our retreat into a simplified version of the world

"The documentary is inspired by the unpredictable events of recent times – from the rise of Donald Trump to Brexit, the war in Syria, the endless migrant crisis, and random bomb attacks. It seeks to explain both why these chaotic events are happening, and why we and our leaders can't understand them. Curtis's theory is that Westerners - politicians, journalists, experts and members of the public alike - have retreated into a simplified, and often completely fake version of the world. But because it is all-encompassing, we accept it as normal.

HyperNormalisation explores this hollow world by looking back at 40 years of events, and profiling a diverse cast of characters such as: the Assad dynasty, Donald Trump, Henry Kissinger, Patti Smith, the early performance artists in New York, President Putin, intelligent machines, Japanese gangsters and suicide bombers."

(Holly Barrett, 22nd September 2016, Royal Television Society)

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20169/11 • Acid Phreak (pseudonym) • Adam CurtisAfghanistan • AirBnB • Alexei Yurchak • Anthony GiddensArab Spring • Arkady Strugatsky • BBC documentary • BBC iPlayer • Boris Strugatsky • Brexit • British filmmaker • British National Front • Carl Rogers • cartoon villain • chaos • chaotic events • chatbot • civil rights movement • Corrupt (pseudonym) • cyber activism • cyberspace • Damascus • David Frost • Declaration of Independence in Cyberspace • delusion • digital rightsdisruptive innovationdocumentaryDonald Trump • Eli Ladopoulos • ELIZA (natural language processing) • fakeness • functioning society • Gulf War • HAC (pseudonym) • Hafez al-Assad • Henry Kissinger • hippies • hypernormalisation • HyperNormalisation (2016) • intelligent machines • internet utopianismIraq • John Barlow • John Lee • Joseph Weizenbaum • Judea Pearl • Julio Fernandez • late communist period • Lester Coleman • liability theory • Lionel Ritchie • machine fetishisation • Mark Abene • Martha Rosler • Masters of Deception (MOD) • migrant crisis • Muammar Gaddafi • Muslim Brotherhood • New YorkNigel FarageOccupy Wall Street • Outlaw (pseudonym) • paradoxPatti Smith • Paul Stira • performance artists • Phiber Optik (pseudonym) • powerlesspretence • random bomb attacks • retreat into simplified views of the world • Roadside Picnic (1972) • Ronald Reagan • Royal Television Society • Scorpion (pseudonym) • self-absorbed baby boomers • self-fulfilling prophecy • Soviet UnionStalker (1979)suicide bombersSyria • Tahir Square • techno-panic • techno-utopiaterrorism • time of great uncertainty • Timothy LearyTron • Uber • Vladimir PutinVladislav Surkov • War in Syria • Yakuza

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JANUARY 2016

Why Man Creates: the great (Western) progress narrative

"How unlikely that one of the least definable films from the last half-century would also be one of the most beloved. A favorite of classroom AV diversions, and an abridged presentation on the very first episode of '60 Minutes' helped make it the most viewed educational film of all time. 'I don't know what it all means,' Saul Bass himself admitted, and his 'Why Man Creates' (1968) is far more loose and playful than the rigid thesis its title might imply. In fact, it is the searching and open-ended nature of the various vignettes that perhaps makes the film resonate so strongly with viewers. Though an Oscar®-winner for Documentary Short Subject, the film is almost entirely invented, apart from recollections of old masters like Edison, Hemingway and Einstein, and brief encounters with scientists striving to innovate for the betterment of mankind. Creators invariably encounter problems, and have no choice but to persevere in the face of discouragement. If the film argues anything, it is that the unbridled pursuit of new ideas makes us uniquely human."

(Sean Savage)

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1968Albert Einstein • Alfred Nobel • American Revolution • Ancient Greeceanimated filmArab • birth of civilization • cancer research • cave painting • cavemen • celebrating human achievement • creative inspirationcreativitydark ages • development of writing • dynamite • early humans • Ernest Hemingway • Euclid • Great Pyramids at Giza • Greek achievements • hand-drawn animationhistory of ideashuman civilizationinvention of the wheelinventiveness • James Bonner • Jesse Greenstein • Leonardo da VincilibertyLouis PasteurLudwig van Beethovenman • mathematical discovery • Mayo Simon • Michelangelo • nature of creativity • nature of justice • organised labour • origin of the universe • Paul Saltman • pioneering mathematicsprogress narratives • pursuit of happiness • religion • Renato Dulbecco • Saul Bassscience historyscientific progressThomas EdisonvignetteWestern culture • Why Man Creates (1968) • zero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 NOVEMBER 2015

Addiction is a social (rather than individual) phenomenon

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2D animation • adaptive state • addictionaffective consumptionalcohol abuse • alcoholism • behavioral addiction • behavioural psychology • Bruce Alexander • chemical dependencycompulsive behaviourdrug addiction • drug dependence • drug taking • drug use • gambling • gambling addiction • human agencyhuman connection • in a nutshell • information design • Johann Hari • kurzgesagt • life crisis • mental health disorders • Moby Digg • Munich • negative consequences • out of control • overdose • parallax scrolling effect • Philipp Dettmer • physical dependency • pornography addiction • punishmentscrolling experiencesociabilitysocial agencysocial behaviour • social connection • social experimentssocial interaction • social isolation • social responsibility • Stephan Rether • substance abusesubstance dependencetraumatroopsunhealthy behaviourVietnam war • war on drugs • YouTube channel

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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