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Which clippings match Carly Gale's concept of 'Interactive Storytelling' pg.1 of 14
11 MARCH 2019

The Wellcome Collection's Interactive Digital Stories

"Digital Stories was developed by Wellcome Collection in 2014 to make the outputs of our ambitious digitisation programme both accessible and meaningful to an audience beyond academic researchers. Each story is arranged in six chapters, following a narrative arc or thematic thread: each chapter takes the form of a long scrolling page containing frames of text, interactives, graphics, and video. Image Galleries and further interactives are accessed by hotspots on the pages. Each image is accompanied by a link to the original source and an option to download."

(Danny Birchall, Anna Faherty, 2016, MW2016: Museums and the Web 2016)

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2014 • Air Loom • all-controlling Air Loom • Anna Faherty • antisemitic stereotype • Anton Mesmer • Ark of curiosities • back and forth in time • cabinet of curiosities • causes of death • chapter metaphor • classificationcollection • Danny Birchall • design for the screen • Digital Stories (2014) • digital story • digital storytellingdigitisation programme • fan mail • fantasy • hypnotism • i-Doc • infinite canvas • interactive digital mediainteractive digital narratives • interactive infographic • interactive information graphicsinteractive information visualisationinteractive multimediainteractive narrativeinteractive storyinteractives • James Tilly Matthews • John Tradescant • Lambeth • Mike Jay • mind control • Mindcraft (digital story) • multimedia interactive • Museums and the Web (conference) • MW2016 • obituary data • online multimediarepositoryscrolling experience • seventeenth century • Sigmund Freud • Sir Henry Wellcome • six individuals • Svengali • The Collectors (digital story) • thematic thread • thirst for knowledge • UKvertical scroll • Wellcome Collection

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JUNE 2017

Sons of Gallipoli: award-winning interactive documentary

"While the story of Gallipoli has been told many times, never has it been told in such a rich and deeply immersive way. For the first time, the tragedy of Gallipoli is brought to life in a profoundly human way as two mothers imagine what it must have been like for other mothers, 100 years ago. Two women on opposite sides. So different. Yet each struggling to understand the meaning of war."

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19151916ANZACAotearoa New Zealandarchive footageAustralasiaAustralia • British Commonwealth • circular interface • Commonwealth • Commonwealth countries • Commonwealth of Nations • Cook Islands • cultural heritagedigital heritageGallipoli Campaign • Gallipoli peninsula • hypermedia • immersive cultural heritage experiences • immersive storytellinginteractive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive experienceinteractive mediainteractive multimedia documentaryinteractive multimedia videointeractive web documentary • military failures • military history • Niue • Ottoman EmpirePapua New Guinea • Pitcairn Islands • Samoa • Tonga • Turkishwarweb based non-linear narrativesweb documentarywebdocWorld War IWWI

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2017

MIT Open Documentary Lab: documentary is a project rather than a genre bound to a particular medium

"Drawing on MIT's legacy of media innovation and its deep commitment to open and accessible information, the MIT Open Documentary Lab brings storytellers, technologists, and scholars together to explore new documentary forms with a particular focus on collaborative, interactive, and immersive storytelling. The Lab understands documentary as a project rather than as a genre bound to a particular medium: documentary offers ways of exploring, representing, and critically engaging the world. It explores the potentials of emerging technologies and techniques to enhance the documentary project by including new voices, telling new stories and reaching new publics. ...

If we are indeed witnessing the emergence of a new form of representation, what can we broker from past moments of change to facilitate our move into the future? How can we evaluate this new work – what descriptive terminology and frameworks for assessment are most useful? What trends can we discern? What are the implications for style, authorship and the craft of filmmaking of these collaboratively sourced and edited moving images? And how can we work with our funding agencies, exhibition venues, and archival systems to give these new and often challenging practices a place in our cultural register?"

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collaborative storytellingdigital storytellingdocumentary experimentsdocumentary filmmakingdocumentary formdocumentary practice • documentary research • documentary series • emerging techniques • emerging technologiesfilmmakinghybrid formsimmersive storytellinginteractive documentary • interactive factual • interactive storytelling • media innovation • media maker • MIT Open Documentary Lab • new documentary forms • new publics • new stories • new voices • open and accessible information • reality-based storytelling • storytelling forms • the documentary subject • transmedia meta-documentary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2015

Life Is Strange: episodic video games prove as addictive as episodic television

"In another important respect, however, Life Is Strange is quite on-trend: it's being released episodically, every six weeks, in two- to three-hour instalments. The premiere episode arrived on 30 January; episode two followed at the end of March, and the next is set for May.

Dividing a title into chapters and publishing them in succession has become something of a phenomenon in the gaming industry in recent years. It started as a low-risk alternative to the usual blockbuster release strategy – and of late has begun to yield many games that, like Life Is Strange, might never have been green-lit under the traditional system.

Simon Parkin, a freelance writer on games for the New Yorker magazine, believes the popularity of the episodic approach has been 'facilitated by the rise of digital distribution methods', which have made it 'much easier and cheaper to release any number of titles'. Instead of pressing and shipping costly discs to brick-and-mortar stores, publishers can now upload a title to online marketplaces like Steam and Sony's Playstation Store, where players can download them instantly.

That ease of digital access has all but revolutionized the dissemination of games."

(Calum Marsh, 26 April 2015)

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2015 • adolescent female • awkward adolescence • branching options • butterfly effect • choices • digital distributiondistribution models • Dontnod Entertainment • episodic format • episodic interactive drama • episodic structurefemale protagonistgirl • graphic adventure • illustrative style • inner struggle • interactive narrative • Life Is Strange (2015) • Maxine Caulfield • media distribution • memory and identity • memory and nostalgia • Michel Koch • nostalgia • photography student • PolaroidPolaroid camera • Raoul Barbet • reverse timerewind time • Square Enix • third-persontime manipulationtime rewindtime-based game mechanic • travel back in time • video game

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JUNE 2015

i-Docs: website of this emerging interactive documentary form

"You will find a number of definitions and points-of-view on what constitutes an interactive documentary. At this point in the development of this fast-moving field we feel that it is important to have an expansive definition that can embrace the many different kinds of work that are emerging. The i-Docs site includes coverage of projects that you may find elsewhere described as web-docs, transmedia documentaries, serious games, cross-platform docs, locative docs, docu-games, pervasive media. For us any project that starts with an intention to document the 'real' and that does so by using digital interactive technology can be considered an i-doc. What unites all these projects is this intersection between digital interactive technology and documentary practice. Where these two things come together, the audience become active agents within documentary – making the work unfold through their interaction and often contributing content. If documentary is about telling stories about our shared world; we are interested in what happens as the audience get more closely involved in this way. At the heart of i-Docs is the question; what opportunities emerge as documentary becomes something that is co-created?"

(Digital Cultures Research Centre at University of the West of England)

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2011 • active agents • active audienceBristolco-creator-ship • cross-platform docs • design for the screen • Digital Cultures Research Centre • digital storytelling • docu-games • docufiction • document the real • documentary formdocumentary practicedocumentary truthhybrid formshypermediai-Doc • i-Docs project • interactive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive multimediainteractive storytelling • Jon Dovey • Judith Aston • locative docs • online multimedia • our shared world • pervasive media • Sandra Gaudenzi • serious gamestheir stories • transmedia documentaries • University of the West of England • UWE Bristol • web-based documentary • web-docs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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