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Which clippings match Aaron Baker's concept of 'Digital Media Design' pg.1 of 49
01 MAY 2016

Constellations: A participatory, online application for research collaboration in higher education interdisciplinary courses

"The research establishes a model for online learning centering on the needs of integrative knowledge practices. Through the metaphor of Constellations, the practice-based research explores the complexities of working within interdisciplinary learning contexts and the potential of tools such as the Folksonomy learning platform for providing necessary conceptual support."

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2015communication designconnectivismConstellations Projectcontent sharing • digital learning tools • eLearning 2.0information architectureinterdisciplinaritylearning designparticipatory culture • PhD by Creative Works • PhD thesisQueensland University of TechnologyQUTSimon Perkins • social and networked learning

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MARCH 2016

Storytelling through playful interactions

"For the new Zippy kidswear store in Setúbal, Portugal we designed two interactive installations and built both in-house at D&P. The 'Sound Poster' is a screen-printed panel that uses conductive ink to trigger sounds from the printed characters, and the 'Fun Receipt' is a receipt for kids, which prints out of a giant mouth on the cash desk and includes characters to colour in, mazes and other games."

(Elly Bowness, 2015)

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2015 • Bare Conductive (agency) • click to explore • come to life • conductive ink • conversation starter • Dalziel and Pow (agency) • digital ink • experience designhand-drawn illustrationinteraction designinteractive animationsinteractive displayinteractive graphical visualisationsinteractive graphics • interactive illustrations • interactive imageryinteractive information design • interactive information graphics • interactive information visualisationinteractive wall • K2Screen (agency) • Ototo • physical interactive storytelling • playful digital animations • Portuguese brand • projected animation • Retail Design Expo • retail expo • screenprinted illustrations • spring to life • visual communication • Zippy (childrenswear brand)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2015

Even tails can have unexpected affordances

"Affordance is a term used to describe the potential uses or actions latent in materials and designs. Glass affords transparency and brittleness. Steel affords strength, smoothness, hardness, and durability. Cotton affords fluffiness, but also breathable cloth when it is spun into yarn and thread. Specific designs, which organize these materials, then lay claim to their own range of affordances. A fork affords stabbing and scooping. A doorknob affords not only hardness and durability, but also turning, pushing, and pulling. Designed things may also have unexpected affordances generated by imaginative users: we may hang signs or clothes on a doorknob, for example, or use a fork to pry open a lid, and so expand the intended affordances of an object."

Caroline Levine (2015) "Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network", Princeton University Press.

Fig.1 YouTube clip titled "What tails are for!" showing an unexpected affordance for a dog's tail.

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affordancescandid videochildhood agencychildhood imaginationchildhood innocence • children and their pets • designed thingsdivergent thinkingdog • dogs tail • free range playimaginative thinking • imaginative users • intended affordances • Lance Ellis • latent actions • latent uses • mischievous behaviour • painting a picture • perceivable action possibilities • potential actions latent in designs • potential actions latent in materials • potential uses latent in designs • potential uses latent in materials • rethinking limitations • tail • technology affordances • unexpected affordances • useful significanceyoung child

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2015

Connbox: prototyping a physical product for video presence with Google Creative Lab, 2011

"At the beginning of 2011 we started a wide-ranging conversation with Google Creative Lab, discussing near-future experiences of Google and its products. They had already in mind another brief before approaching us, to create a physical product encapsulating Google voice/video chat services. This brief became known as 'Connection Box' or 'Connbox' for short…

There were interaction & product design challenges in making a simpler, self-contained video chat appliance, amplified by the problem of taking the things we take for granted on the desktop or touchscreen: things like the standard UI, windowing, inputs and outputs, that all had to be re-imagined as physical controls.

This is not a simple translation between a software and hardware behaviour, it’s more than just turning software controls into physical switches or levers.

It involves choosing what to discard, what to keep and what to emphasise.

Should the product allow ‘ringing’ or ‘knocking’ to kickstart a conversation, or should it rely on other audio or visual cues? How do we encourage always-on, ambient, background presence with the possibility of spontaneous conversations and ad-hoc, playful exchanges? Existing ‘video calling’ UI is not set up to encourage this, so what is the new model of the interaction?

To do this we explored in abstract some of the product behaviours around communicating through video and audio. "

(Matt Jones, 26 February 2013, Berg Ltd)

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2011 • Apple FaceTime • Berg Ltd • communications interaction interface • computer-mediated interaction • connbox • design prototypedesigning for interaction • development log • Durrell Bishop • experiential proof • form and functionfuture interfacesGolan Levin • Google Creative Lab • Google Hangouts • Google Plus • hardware prototyping • interaction designinteraction styleslive video • Luckybite • material exploration • near-future scenariosOpenFrameworks • physical product • portalproduct design • prototyping brief • research and developmentSkypesoftware prototypingtechnology affordances • teleconference • video calling • video chat • video conferencing • video phone • video presence • video-based communication • videoconferencing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2015

Life Is Strange: episodic video games prove as addictive as episodic television

"In another important respect, however, Life Is Strange is quite on-trend: it's being released episodically, every six weeks, in two- to three-hour instalments. The premiere episode arrived on 30 January; episode two followed at the end of March, and the next is set for May.

Dividing a title into chapters and publishing them in succession has become something of a phenomenon in the gaming industry in recent years. It started as a low-risk alternative to the usual blockbuster release strategy – and of late has begun to yield many games that, like Life Is Strange, might never have been green-lit under the traditional system.

Simon Parkin, a freelance writer on games for the New Yorker magazine, believes the popularity of the episodic approach has been 'facilitated by the rise of digital distribution methods', which have made it 'much easier and cheaper to release any number of titles'. Instead of pressing and shipping costly discs to brick-and-mortar stores, publishers can now upload a title to online marketplaces like Steam and Sony's Playstation Store, where players can download them instantly.

That ease of digital access has all but revolutionized the dissemination of games."

(Calum Marsh, 26 April 2015)

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2015 • adolescent female • awkward adolescence • branching options • butterfly effect • choices • digital distributiondistribution models • Dontnod Entertainment • episodic format • episodic interactive drama • episodic structurefemale protagonistgirl • graphic adventure • illustrative style • inner struggle • interactive narrative • Life Is Strange (2015) • Maxine Caulfield • media distribution • memory and identity • memory and nostalgia • Michel Koch • nostalgia • photography student • PolaroidPolaroid camera • Raoul Barbet • reverse timerewind time • Square Enix • third-persontime manipulationtime rewindtime-based game mechanic • travel back in time • video game

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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