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Which clippings match Aaron Kershaw's concept of 'Advertising And Promotion' pg.1 of 5
24 APRIL 2016

Examples of parody tv ad remixes

John Lewis Christmas Advert 2016 - Donald Trump and Hillary (Parody Version) LOL; The John Lewis Christmas Ad 2015 [The Dark Side Version] - Star Wars parody by The Poke; John Lewis Christmas Advert 2015 - Creepy Parody #ManOnTheMoon; The Girl On A Bike With A Singing Cat Advert [Parody].

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TAGS

Barack Obama • basket • bicyclecat • Christmas ad • Christmas advert • creepyfireHillary Clinton • John Lewis • parodyparody rebootparody versionparody video remixesplaying against typere-cutremixesrepurposingsentimentality • Smack My Bitch Up (1997) • songspoofStar Wars • telescope • The Poke • The Prodigy • tv adtv advertvideo remixvoyeurvsyoung girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 FEBRUARY 2016

Retailer uses drones to playfully respond to social media censorship

"clothing retail store BUYMA recently produced a creative commercial that strictly wants you to buy their clothes. Since Japanese TV programs are legally obligated to cover sensitive body parts, BUYMA uses drones to fully censor two professional belly [sic] dancers while they dance their routine naked."

[This Buyma ad which was created for television clearly plays with concepts around censorship - both in the context of Japanese broadcast media and perhaps more importantly in the context of social media where it will likely have most traction. In doing so the ad playfully references contemporary restrictions in place on sites such as Facebook.]

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2015ballet • Buyma (retailer) • censorshipcheekyclassical balletclothing retailercomedy of mannerscultural conventionsdancedroneetiquette • flying drone • high-technology • hoverJapan • Japanese online retailer • morality • naked ballet dancing • naughty • nude man • nude women • nudity • obscenity • obscuring nudity • online retailer • playful provocation • playfulnesspolite societyquadcoptersexual taboo • social media censorship • social shopping service • tabootv adtv advertveiledviral advisual gag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2015

Audi ad by Chris Curtis of Not To Scale

"This commercial for Audi Celebrates their amazing dominance of Le Mans. Despite showing the new coupe R18 car, Director Chris Curtis wanted to focus on their driver (Allan McNish) and the incredible physical feat it takes to drive at the top level in this world famous race. The music is composed by the very talented Chris Reed. Original presented in 3D stereoscopic, this is the 2D version of the version delivered for cinema and TV."

Directed by Chris Curtis for Not To Scale which "is an established production company and animation studio representing an evolving international roster of multi–disciplined film makers who place craft and digital animation techniques at the heart of what they do".

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20142D • Allan McNish • Audiblack and whitecarcar ad • Chris Curtis • Chris Reed • day in the lifedesign agency • drawing back into the image • drawing into technique • drive • driver • drivinggraphic artgraphic illustration • Le Mans • monotonemotion graphics • Not To Scale (design agency) • physical feat • racecar • stereoscopic 3D • TV commercial • world famous race

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 FEBRUARY 2015

1980s television commercial for Westpac Bank, Australia

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1980sadadvertisement designAustraliabank • banking • cinematographycolour tintfilm editing • incomplete sentences • quick cutsselective focus • sentence fragments • shallow depth of fieldshallow focustelevision advertisement • television commercial • TVCWestpacWestpac Bank • Westpac Banking Corporation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MARCH 2014

Norman Kirk split-screen political ad for 1969 NZ general election

"This 1969 advertisement for the Labour Party emphasised the leadership qualities of Norman Kirk and sought to capitalise on a public mood for change as that turbulent decade drew to a close. It screened in full colour in cinemas and in black–and–white on television (colour TV wasn't introduced until 1973). Its striking split–screen imagery and pop–styled theme song were clearly aimed at younger voters, a potentially important audience in an election when the voting age was lowered from 21 to 20 (it would be reduced further, to 18, in 1974). It was not enough, however, to oust Keith Holyoake's National government, which had ruled for the previous nine years."

TAGS

1969advertisementAotearoa New Zealand • campaign advertising • cinematic techniqueColenso BBDO • dancing Cossacks (political TV ad) • film techniquegeneral electionintra-frame • Keith Holyoake • Labour governmentLabour Party • mood for change • National (political party) • Norman Kirk • optical printing • political advertising • Prime MinisterRobert Muldoonsplit-screenThomas Crown Affair (1968) • turbulent decade • TV commercial

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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