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Review your clippings collection. Simon Perkins pg.1 of 620
09 NOVEMBER 2018

Designing Research for Qualitative Data Analysis

"Qualitative data analysis aims to make sense of the abundant, varied, mostly nonnumeric forms of information that accrue during an investigation. As qualitative researchers, we reflect not only on each piece of data by itself but also on all the data as an integrated, blended, composite package. Increasingly, qualitative researchers are participants in interdisciplinary, mixed-methods research teams for which analytic and interpretive processes are necessarily complementary, distinct, clearly articulated, and critical to the larger investigation. We search for insight, meaning, understanding, and larger patterns of knowledge, intent, and action in what we generate as data. Approaching this task in a responsive, inductive, transparent, yet systematic way demands our best balance of good science, appropriate rigor and quality, and openness to unanticipated findings. Many qualitative studies now include multiple sources of data, including narrative or textual and visual (e.g., photographs, videos, creative works and art, and theatric or performative components) information for analysis. Thorne (2008) describes the analytic process as moving 'from pieces to patterns' (p. 142) through the activities of organizing, reading and reviewing mindfully, coding, reflection, thematic derivation, and finding meaning."

(Jennifer B. Averill)

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activities of organising • analytic process • analytic processes • data analysis • from pieces to patterns • inductive enquiry • information for analysis • interdisciplinary research • interpretive processes • looking for pattern within data • mixed methods research • multiple sources of data • nursing • nursing research • nursing research practice • pattern of meaning • patterns of action • patterns of intent • patterns of knowledgepatterns of meaningqualitative analysisqualitative data analysis • qualitative data analysis approaches • qualitative data analysis methods • qualitative data analysis techniques • qualitative research techniquequalitative researchersqualitative studiesreadingresearch design • reviewing mindfully • running the interview process • Sally Thorne • sensemakingsystematic approachthematic analysisthematic codingthematic patterns

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 SEPTEMBER 2018

Wildish Bambino: This is the TV

Wildish Bambino's This is the TV. 2018. BBC One, The Lenny Henry Birthday Show. 22 August 2018, 4 minutes.

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2018 • BAME • BBC • BME • British comedy • Childish Gambino • comedyinnovationintertextuality • Lenny Henry • LGBTold mediaparodytelevision heritagetelevision industry • The Lenny Henry Birthday Show • This Is America (2018) • TVUKUK TelevisionYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 SEPTEMBER 2018

Leading Lady Parts: a satire on the problem of having to measure-up to an idealised concept of what it means to be a woman

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2018 • Anthony Welsh • auditionbackstageBBC Four • British acting talent • casting • Catherine Tate • comedy • dream role • Emilia Clarke • Felicity Jones • Florence Pugh • Gemma Arterton • Gemma Chan • idealised • Jessica Swale • Katie Leung • Leading Lady Parts (2018) • Lena Headey • role of a lifetime • satireshort film • Stacy Martin • stereotypestelevision business • Tom Hiddleston • UKUK Televisionwomen • Wunmi Mosak

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 SEPTEMBER 2018

Sweden: Truth, Lies and Manipulated Narratives

"Good Sweden vs Bad Sweden. Sweden is usually recognised as being innovative, transparent and progressive, with good healthcare, welfare and gender equality. More recently, however, a growing chorus of Sweden sceptics have emerged. In this report, Gabriel Gatehouse went to find out more about these competing narratives."

Sweden: Truth, Lies and Manipulated Narratives. 2018. BBC Two, BBC Newsnight. 22 August 2018, 22:30, 18 minutes.

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BBC Twocontrasting perspectivescultural narrativescultural valuesdiscrepancydrugsdual narrativesEvan Davis • failed multicultural project • fiction and reality • Gabriel Gatehouse • good versus evilgunsimmigration • Jack Garland • liberal utopia • lies • Malmo • manipulated narratives • mirror worldmodel citizennationalism • Newsnight (TV programme) • night and day metaphorother sideparallel narrativesparallel storiesprejudgment • questioning familiar narratives • refugee • Rosengard • secular society • Stuart Denman • Swedentruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 FEBRUARY 2018

From cause to relation

"For the occidental tradition, the idea of God is intimately related to the idea of causality. That means that for any chain of facts it is reasonable to postulate an absolute beginning, which can be called 'God'. Nevertheless, if instead of explaining the universe through the principle of causality we decide to refer to the pure idea of a 'form' -as one can speak of 'rhetorical (or mathematical) forms'-, the chain ceases to be factual and becomes structural and iterative, like a grammar, and there is no longer any way to avoid the possibility of denying a 'real' beginning. The entities in the world become figures in a diagram, the ontological 'history' becomes a rhetorical 'texture' (trama), and God (written with upper initial) may always 'be moved' by some other 'god' (with lower initial), and so on, following a never ending texture 'of dust, and time, and dream and agonies'".

(Ivan Almeida, Cristina Parodi, 1996)

Almeida, I. and C. Parodi (1996). "Borges and the Ontology of Tropes." Variaciones Borges(2).

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1996 • absolute beginning • bringing into relationcausality • chain of facts • Cristina Parodi • entities • explaining the universe • factuality • figures in a diagram • formgodhistory of ideasiterative • Ivan Almeida • Jorge Luis Borges • network model of relations • network morphology • occidental • ontological history • principle of causality • real beginning • relational model • relational view • rhetorical forms • rhetorical texture • structural logic • trama • Variaciones Borges

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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