Not Signed-In
Review your clippings collection. Simon Perkins pg.1 of 618
05 NOVEMBER 2017

Dada was an effort to reinvigorate art through critical negation

"we should think of Dada in terms of the precise and deliberate negation of art. Dada sought to destroy art. Why? It is my contention that for Dada, art was itself negative: Dada conceived of art as absence, exclusion, and division. This is not in the sense that art was somehow in a state of decay or socially compromised. Rather, for Dada, art was its processes of negation, processes which were not contingent but constitutive and essential to art"

(Mark Hutchinson, 2015)

Hutchinson, M. (2015). "Dada Contra Art History." Dada/Surrealism 20(1).

2

TAGS

2015activist practices • against art • anti-disciplinary activities • art as activism • art historyartistic activismavant-garde art • biding legacy • call to arms • conventional cultural terms • critical negation • Dada • Dada Manifesto • destruction of art • destruction of the old • disciplinary promiscuity • discursive struggleshegemonyinstitutionalised artinterdisciplinaritylegacy • Mark Hutchinson • modernism • negation • negativity • nihilism • ossification • painting salons • political art • positive creativity • raucous skepticism • rebellious art • Salon des Refuses • skepticism • stagnation • subversion • sweep clean • University of Iowa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2017

Michael Glassco: Contested images: the politics and poetics of appropriation

"The dissertation traces the tactics of appropriation of Barbara Kruger, The Billboard Liberation Front and Shepard Fairey as exemplars of transgression and commodification within the changing commercial conditions of neo-liberalism. Their works, tactics and strategies are emphasized as points of insight into the practices and conditions of subversion as well as the limits of hegemonic containment that reproduces the political and economic structure within which they operated. The dissertation furthers and contributes to the theoretical and methodology of critical cultural studies as it emphasizes the role of the economy and ideology in reproducing the prevailing hegemonic order. Critical cultural studies hinges on the concepts of hegemony as lived discursive and ideological struggles over meaning and communication resources within historically specific and socially structured contexts. This framework emphasizes the poetics of appropriation - the use, meaning and spaces of articulation of visual representations with the politics - the socio-economic and discursive conditions that reproduce the dominant social order."

(Michael Glassco, 2012, University of Iowa)

TAGS

2012activismAdbustersadvertising hijacking • advertising imagery • advertising messages • appropriated images • appropriation activists • appropriation artists • appropriation practices • appropriation tactics • Barbara Kruger • Billboard Liberation Front • bricoleur • Buy Nothing Day • co-optioncommodificationconstructed identitiesconsumption spectaclecritical cultural hijacking • critical cultural studies • critique in public spaces • critique power • culture jammingdiscursive struggles • fauxvertising • graphic agitator • guerrilla artGuerrilla Girlsguerrilla tactics • hegemonic containment • hegemony • ideological struggle • ideological systems • ideological warfare • images of appropriation • institutionalised art • Jenny Holzer • manufacturing identity • media hijacking • Michael Glassco • neoliberalismparticipatory engagement • pastiche of visual codes • PhD thesis • poetics of appropriation • political protest • prevailing hegemonic order • privatisation of culture • public space • rebellious bricoleur • revolutionary subjects • Robbie Conal • Rosemary Coombe • Shepard Fairey • sublimating desire • subversionsubvertisements • subvertising • systematic asymmetries of power • tactic of dissent • tactical strikes • tactics of appropriation • tactics of guerrilla semiotics • The Billboard Liberation Front • transgression • TV Turn off Week • un-commercials • unequal access to cultural resources • University of Iowavisual codesvisual representation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2017

Artists appropriate when they adopt imagery, concepts and ways of making art other artists have used at other times

"Appropriation, first of all, is a common technique. People appropriate when they make things their own and integrate them into their way of life, by buying or stealing commodities, acquiring knowledge, claiming places as theirs and so on. Artists appropriate when they adopt imagery, concepts and ways of making art other artists have used at other times to adapt these artistic means to their own interests, or when they take objects, images or practices from popular (or foreign) cultures and restage them within the context of their work to either enrich or erode conventional definitions of what an artwork can be. As such, this technique could be described as comparatively timeless, or at least, as being practiced as long as modern society exists. For, ever since labour was divided and the abstract organization of social life alienated people from the way in which they would want to live, appropriation has been a practice of getting back from society what it takes from its members. At the same time, appropriation can be understood as one of the most basic procedures of modern art production and education. To cite, copy and modify exemplary works from art history is the model for developing art practice (neo)classicist tendencies have always championed. During the last two centuries this model was repeatedly challenged by advocates of the belief that modern individuals should produce radically new art by virture of their spontaneous creativity. The postmodern critics of this cult of individual genius in turn claimed that it is a gross ideological distortion to portray the making of art as a heroic act of original creation. Instead they advanced the paradigm of appropriation as a materialist model that describes art production as the gradual re-shuffling of a basic set of cultural terms through their strategical re-use and eventual transformation."

(Jan Verwoert, 2007)

ART&RESEARCH: A Journal of Ideas, Contexts and Methods, Volume 1. No. 2. Summer 2007, ISSN 1752-6388

1

TAGS

2007 • acquiring knowledge • adopting concepts • adopting imagery • adopting ways of making art • appropriation practicesArt and Research (journal)art historyart practice • artistic appropriation • artistic meansartworkauthor as geniusauthorshipcitationcite • common creative technique • copy and modify • copy-and-paste culturecopying of artistic works • Craig Owens • creative genius • creative technique • cult of individual genius • cult of the author • Douglas Crimp • exemplary works • expropriation • Frederic Jameson • genial creatorgenius myth • heroic act • ideological distortion • Jan Verwoert • making of art • materialist model • modern art • modern art education • modern art production • neoclassicist tendencies • nothing is original • original creation • pastiche • postmodern critics • radically new art • Robert Longoromantic notion of the artist • spontaneous creativity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2017

Tribes: DISCWOMAN

"The 12-minute documentary ... follows the three co-founders of DISCWOMAN, a New York-based female DJ collective and booking agency, as they share their perspectives on the role women have played within electronic music. ... Also celebrated in the documentary are the shared views of world-renowned female-DJs such as Black Madonna, Nicole Moudaber, Star Eyes, Sandunes, Demian Licht, and Nina Sonik."

(PR Newswire, 8 March 2016)

1

TAGS

2016 • all-female line-up • Black Madonna • Christine Tran • Daphne Oram • Demian Licht • Discwoman • DJ • DJ Haram • DJs Umfang • documentary • documentary short • electronic music • electronic music culture • Emma Burgess-Olson • feminist music artist • Frankie Hutchinson • music culture • New York City • Nicole Moudaber • Nina Sonik • Sandunes • short documentary • Smirnoff Sound Collective • Star Eyes • Tygapaw • Volvox • women in electronic music culture • women of colour

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 OCTOBER 2017

Shimon Tzabar: Israel should get out of the occupied territories

"Our right to defend ourselves from extermination does not give us the right to oppress others. Occupation entails foreign rule. Foreign rule entails resistance. Resistance entails repression. Repression entails terror and counter-terror. The victims of terror are mostly innocent people. Holding on to the occupied territories will turn us into a nation of murderers and murder victims. Let us get out of the occupied territories immediately."

(Shimon Tzabar, 22 September 1967, Ha'aretz)

1

TAGS

1967autonomy • Betar • British Mandate Palestine • counter-terror • extermination • foreign rule • Haaretz • Haganah • illegal settlement • Irgun • Israeli • Israeli state • Jewish HolocaustJewish settlers • Menachem Begin • Naomi Tzabar • nationhoodoccupied territoriesoccupied territoryoccupying poweroppression • pacifist • painterPalestinian territories • Palestinian-Jewish bi-national state • poetprogressive political change • provocative advertisement • renaissance man • repression • resistance during the Mandate • resistance movement • right-wing Zionist youth movement • satirist • Shimon Tzabar • sovereignty • Stern Gang • subjugationTel Avivterrorterrorism • terrorist group • terroristswriterZionist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.