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Review your clippings collection. David Rogerson pg.1 of 8
25 NOVEMBER 2018

A Preliminary Design for a 3-D Spatial User Interface for Internet Gopher (1993)

"This paper describes the beginnings of an exploratory design project: its aim is to sketch out a starting point for the design of a 3-D spatial interface to a large, internet-based information system, and to capture some of the initial design rationale. After this, we intend to refine the design, implement it, make it freely available over the internet, and observe the reactions to and usage of the interface. "

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TAGS

3D • early internet • gopher • VR

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
24 NOVEMBER 2018

WWWTXT: Revisit the early Internet (1980-94)

"I’m thinking about my dream of the VR Internet again. ?93APR"

"In 1995, commercialization, a swelling population, and the multimedia revolution began to shape Web 1.0 and the modern Internet. 1980–94 represent the final years of a much smaller, non-commercial, and text-dominated Internet.

The users of this era were not only programmers, physicists, and university residents—they were also tinkerers, early-adopters, whiz kids, and nerds. Their conversations and documents—valiantly preserved by digital archivists—are fractured across numerous services, increasingly offline-only, and incredibly voluminous (100GB+).

wwwtxt digs deep and resurrects the voices of these digital pioneers as unedited, compelling, and insightful 140-character excerpts."

TAGS

early internet • internet • internet culture • wwwtxt

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
09 MARCH 2010

Acquiring new media works

"Museologists face a new reality in our fast–changing high–tech world. Works with technological components pose unfamiliar challenges and require acquisition procedures that differ from traditional practices. Primarily, this means giving careful consideration to the notions of copyright (intellectual property), conservation and artist collaboration prior to the purchase of media–based art.

The Survey of New Media Cataloguing Practices report, produced by the DOCAM Cataloguing Structure Committee, indicates that few museum institutions have established a specific policy for acquiring new media works. Yet a policy of this sort is an important tool: used to assess the characteristics and short–, medium– and long–term conservation and exhibition needs of such works, it can help museums make informed choices when envisaging additions to their collections."

(DOCAM)

TAGS

acquisition procedures • acquisitionsadded value • artist collaboration • arts and innovationarts fundingcommercialismconservationcopyrightcreative capitalcreative entrepreneurshipcreative industries • DOCAM • DOCAM Cataloguing Structure Committee • entrepreneurexhibitionfunding • high-tech world • intellectual propertymarket failuremarkets • media-based art • museologymuseumnew media • new media works • patronpolicysocial gainsponsorship • Survey of New Media Cataloguing Practices • value of art

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
02 MARCH 2010

Reading ban on leaked Harry Potter

"Fourteen fans bought Harry Potter and the Half–Blood Prince from The Real Canadian Superstore in Coquitlam on the west coast of Canada before managers realised their mistake [selling books that were under embargo]. But readers will be unable to share their knowledge after Raincoast Books, the book's Canadian publisher, was granted a 'John Doe' injunction prohibiting the buyers from even reading their copies before the publication date.

The supreme court of British Columbia issued a court order preventing anyone from 'displaying, reading, offering for sale, selling or exhibiting in public' their books. J. K. Rowling's legal advisers said that the author was entitled to prevent buyers from reading their own books even though they had not broken the law.

'The fact is that this is property that should not have been in their possession,' said Neil Blair, a legal specialist for Christopher Little, the author's literary agent. 'Copyright holders are entitled to protect their work. If the content of the book is confidential until July 16, which it is, why shouldn't someone who has the physical book be prevented from reading it and thereby obtaining the confidential information? How they came to have access to the book is immaterial'."

(The Times Online)

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TAGS

added valuearts and innovationarts fundingauthorbookBritish ColumbiaCanadacommercialismconfidentialcopyright • Coquitlam • creative capitalcreative entrepreneurshipcreative industries • embargo • entrepreneurfundingHarry Potter • Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince • JK Rowlingmarket failuremarketspatron • Raincoast Books • social gainsponsorship • The Real Canadian Superstore • value of art

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
02 MARCH 2010

Did You Say “Intellectual Property”? It's a Seductive Mirage

"It has become fashionable to toss copyright, patents, and trademarks–three separate and different entities involving three separate and different sets of laws–into one pot and call it 'intellectual property'. The distorting and confusing term did not arise by accident. Companies that gain from the confusion promoted it. The clearest way out of the confusion is to reject the term entirely."

(Richard M. Stallman)

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
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