Not Signed-In
What's new on Folksonomy? pg.1 of 797
17 SEPTEMBER 2017

The Macedonian digital workers behind the US fake news industry

"In the final weeks of the US presidential election, Veles attained a weird infamy in the most powerful nation on earth; stories in The Guardian and on BuzzFeed revealed that the Macedonian town of 55,000 was the registered home of at least 100 pro-Trump websites, many of them filled with sensationalist, utterly fake news. (The imminent criminal indictment of Hillary Clinton was a popular theme; another was the pope's approval of Trump.) The sites' ample traffic was rewarded handsomely by automated advertising engines, like Google's AdSense. An article in The New Yorker described how President Barack Obama himself spent a day in the final week of the campaign talking 'almost obsessively' about Veles and its 'digital gold rush.'"

(Samanth Subramanian, 15 February 2017, Wired)

1

TAGS

20172020advertising • American news sites • baseless claimsCNN • consumerist boom • deceitfulnessdeceptiondestabilised perception • digital gold rush • digital work • digital worker • Donald Trumpfake news • fake news industry • fake news websites • fakery • false claims • false information • false news • false statementsfalsehoodfalsificationfalsify realityfraud • fraudulent behaviour • gullibilityinfamyliesMacedonia • manipulating information • manipulative contrivances • misinformationmistruthsmoralitynews mediapost-truth politicspro-Trump mediasensationalism • sensationalist stories • Titov Veles • true or false • Trump Veles • US election • US election campaign • Veles • viral news media • Yugoslavia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 SEPTEMBER 2017

Truth In Advertising: Guerrilla Art in Santa Cruz 1980-1985

"The photographs in this exhibit are of actual altered billboards that appeared on the streets of Santa Cruz, California from 1980 to 1985. The photographs have been adjusted for brightness, contrast, and parallax, but no content changes were made.

The billboards were made over by a clandestine network of midnight billboard editors operating under the name of Truth In Advertising, or TIA for short.

This exhibit of their historic work was first presented in 2007 at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History. The exhibit is made up of 12 billboards presented in the order in which they appeared on the streets of Santa Cruz. The sequence also tells the story of Truth in Advertising, and documents publicity and commentary."

(Bob Stayton)

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

TAGS

1980sactivismadadvertising billboardsadvertising hijackingappropriation practicesbillboardbillboard bandit • Bob Stayton • critical cultural hijacking • culture jammingdetournement publicitaire • guerrilla art • guerrilla tacticsmedia hijacking • media reinterpretation • re-purposerecombinatory practiceridicule • Santa Cruz • transformative works • Truth in Advertising (TIA) • William Board (pseudonym)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 AUGUST 2017

A Wednesday ritual: creating photo romans in her cafe office

"Plus qu'une habitude, le café matinal est un rituel. Seul(e) ou en compagnie, ce moment d'intimité marque la journée qui va suivre. Pour les personnes qui exercent des professions indépendantes, les cafés constituent un bureau mobile où, selon les humeurs et les rendez-vous, les espaces prennent d'autres dimensions. Tous les mercredis, Lia Rochas-Pàris rencontre une personnalité dans un café : en images et en bulles. Et avec l'intégralité de la conversation à la suite."

(Lia Rochas-Paris)

1

2

3

4

TAGS

cafecafe officecafe societyconversationhanging out • independent professionals • Lia Rochas-Paris • mobile office • morning coffee • photo novels • photo romanpictorial narrativeritualvisual diaryvisual narrative • Wednesday • working practices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 AUGUST 2017

On the Passage of a few People through a Rather Brief Moment in Time: The Situationist International 1956-1972

"The Situationist International (SI) was an international organization of social revolutionaries, the exclusive membership of which was made up of avant-garde artists, intellectuals, and political theorists, active from its formation in 1957 to its dissolution in 1972.

The intellectual foundations of the Situationist International were derived primarily from anti-authoritarian Marxism and the avant-garde art movements of the early 20th century, particularly Dada and Surrealism. Overall, situationist theory represented an attempt to synthesize this diverse field of theoretical disciplines into a modern and comprehensive critique of mid-20th century advanced capitalism. The situationists recognized that capitalism had changed since Marx's formative writings, but maintained that his analysis of the capitalist mode of production remained fundamentally correct; they rearticulated and expanded upon several classical Marxist concepts, such as his theory of alienation. In their expanded interpretation of Marxist theory, the situationists asserted that the misery of social alienation and commodity fetishism were no longer limited to the fundamental components of capitalist society, but had now in advanced capitalism spread themselves to every aspect of life and culture. They resolutely rejected the idea that advanced capitalism's apparent successes—such as technological advancement, increased income, and increased leisure—could ever outweigh the social dysfunction and degradation of everyday life that it simultaneously inflicted.

Essential to situationist theory was the concept of the spectacle, a unified critique of advanced capitalism of which a primary concern was the progressively increasing tendency towards the expression and mediation of social relations through objects. The situationists believed that the shift from individual expression through directly lived experiences, or the first-hand fulfillment of authentic desires, to individual expression by proxy through the exchange or consumption of commodities, or passive second-hand alienation, inflicted significant and far-reaching damage to the quality of human life for both individuals and society. Another important concept of situationist theory was the primary means of counteracting the spectacle; the construction of situations, moments of life deliberately constructed for the purpose of reawakening and pursuing authentic desires, experiencing the feeling of life and adventure, and the liberation of everyday life.

When the Situationist International was first formed, it had a predominantly artistic focus; emphasis was placed on concepts like unitary urbanism and psychogeography. Gradually, however, that focus shifted more towards revolutionary and political theory. The Situationist International reached the apex of its creative output and influence in 1967 and 1968, with the former marking the publication of the two most significant texts of the situationist movement, The Society of the Spectacle by Guy Debord and The Revolution of Everyday Life by Raoul Vaneigem. The expressed writing and political theory of the two aforementioned texts, along with other situationist publications, proved greatly influential in shaping the ideas behind the May 1968 insurrections in France; quotes, phrases, and slogans from situationist texts and publications were ubiquitous on posters and graffiti throughout France during the uprisings."

1

TAGS

195719721989 • advanced capitalism • anti-authoritarianart movement • authentic desires • avant-garde art • Branka Bogdanov • capitalist society • commodity fetishism • commodity spectacle • consumer societyconsumerism • consumption of commodities • Dadadegradationdetournement • directly lived experiences • documentary filmearly 20th centuryeveryday life • exchange of commodities • expression and mediation of social relations through objects • feeling of adventure • feeling of life • first-hand fulfillment of authentic desires • graffiti • Greil Marcus • Guy Debord • individual expression by proxy • Jamie Reid • liberation of everyday life • Malcolm Mac Laren • Marxism • Marxist concepts • Marxist theory • May 1968 • means of production • mid-20th century advanced capitalism • mode of production • moments of life • political theorists • political theorypsychogeography • Raoul Vaneigem • reawakening • revolutionary theory • second-hand alienation • Situationist International • situationist movement • situationist theory • situations • slogan • social alienation • social dysfunction • social relations • social revolutionaries • Society of the Spectacle (Guy Debord)spectaclesurrealism • The Revolution of Everyday Life (1967) • theory of alienation • Thomas Levine • UbuWeb • unified critique • unitary urbanism • video documentary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 AUGUST 2017

Everything Is Terrible: a celebration of 80s retro cheesiness

"Everything Is Terrible! is the internet sensation video collective responsible for some of this millennium's most intriguing and mind melting videos. From Yogi Ogi Dogi, the creepy yoga farmer, to Cat Massage to Pubic Hair Dying to the Yellow Dino who hunts pedophiles; for 7 years EIT! has mined the absurd VHS universe for the best/worst bits. Every video is original and fantastic media art that creates a window into America's hidden past and future!"

1
2
3
4
5

TAGS

80s televisionabsurdAmerican popular cultureaural treasurebad tastecheesyclipscollection of video clipscultural history • dredge up • earnestness • Everything Is Terrible • exercise videos • hidden past • infomercials • kitschmelangemovie clipnaivety • over-earnestness • popular culture • postmodern masterwork • PSAretroretro cheesiness • terrible footage • VHSvideo archivevideo collection • video collective • web video • workout videos

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.